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Full text of "State record North Carolina"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/staterecordnorth1956nort 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

CATALOG 

1956-1957, 1957-1958 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE RECORD 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



OF 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



CATALOG ISSUE 



1956-1958 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR SESSIONS 1956-1957 
AND 1957-1958 



Published monthly by the North Carolina Stote 
Co ege of Agriculture and Engineering. State 
College Station entered as second-class matter 
?^^°^^[, '6' 1917, at the post office at Raleigh 
N. C. Under the act of AUGUST 24, 1912. 

VOLUME 56 NUMBER 2 OCTOBER, 1956 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND ENGINEERING • ESTABLISHED 1887 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS 17 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 35 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 36 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN 72 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 77 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 94 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 134 

SCHOOL OF GENERAL STUDIES 147 

SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 151 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 171 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, FOUNDATIONS, PUBLICATIONS 294 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 296 

OFFICERS 297 

INDEX 324 

2 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA (Offices, Chapel Hill, N. C.) comprises North 
Corolma State College at Raleigh, The Womon's College at Greensboro, and The 
University at Chapel Hill, 

William C. Friday, B.S., LL.B., Acting President 

William M. Whyburn, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Acting Provost 

William D. CarmichacI, Jr.,S.B. COMM., Vice-President and Finance Officer 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

OF 
AGRICULTURE 

CHANCELLOR AND 

Carey Hoyt Bostian ^k. ■.— • i. ■ ^Pi.» . ^ ■ .— 

"A" Holladay Hall ENGINEERING 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

John W. Shirley 
Dean of the Faculty 
110 Holladay Hall 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

D. W. Colvard, Dean 

1 15 Patterson Hall 
R. L. Lovvorn, Acting Director V. A. Rice 

Agricultural Experiment Station Director of Instruction 

105 Patterson Hall 111 Patterson Hall 

R. W. Cummings, Head D. S. Weaver, Director 

Agricultural Mission in Peru Agricultural Extension Service 

Lima, Peru 104 Ricks Hall 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

H. L. Kamphoefner, Deon 
200 Brooks Hall 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

J. B. Kirkland, Dean 
1 19 Tompkins Hall 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

J. H. Lampc, Dean 
229 Riddick Building 
W. E. Adams, N. W. Connor, Director 

Director of Instruction Engineering Research 
232 Riddick Building 124 Riddick Building 

W. C. Bell, Director 
Industrial Experimental Program 
Old Ceramic Building 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

R J. Preston, Deon 
162 Kilgore Hall 



SeHdOL OF GENERAL STUDIES 

C. A. Hickman, Dean 
103 Peele Hall 



SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

M. E. Compbell, Dean 

116 Nelson Textile Building 

W. E. Newell, Director 

Textile Research 

107 Nelson Textile Building 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

D. 8. Anderson, Dean 
145 Gardner Hall 



LIBRARY 

H. C. Brown, Librarian 
D. H. Hill Library 



COLLEGE EXTENSION 

E. W. Ruggles, Director 
College Extension Division 
118 191 1 Building 

Miss Gertrude Cox 

Director, Institute of Statistics 

1 10 Patterson Hall 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Jomes J. Stewart, Jr. 
Dean of Student Affairs 
Holladay Hall 



DEAN OF STUDENTS 

E. L. Cloyd 
Holladay Hall 



ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION 

K. D. Raab, Director F. H. Spain, Asst. Director 

Holloday Hall Holladay Hall 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

B. C. Talley, Jr., Director 
Holladay Holl 

RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS MUSIC ACTIVITIES COLLEGE UNION 

O. B Wooldridgc, Jr., Director C. H. Kutschinski, Director G O. T. Erdahl, Director 

'^■M-CA. 1)4 1911 Building College Union 

^ .^r- 1°''*^''' ^"* Director R. A. Barnes, Asst. Director R. S. Heaton, Asst. Director 

y-M.C.A. 114-1911 Building College Union 

STUDENT HOUSING 

N. B. Wotts, Director 
Holladoy Holl 



T/ 



STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 



COUNSELING CENTER 



STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 
J.J. Combs, College Physicion 
Clark Hall 



STUDENT FINANCIAL AlC 
L. B. Rogers 



AIR FORCE ROTC 

Col. J. F. Risher, Jr., Professor Air Science 

and Tactics 
145 Coliseum 



MILITARY TRAINING 

ARMY ROTC 

Col. R. R. Middlebrooks, Professor Military 
Science and Tactics 
154 Coliseum 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Roy B. Clogston 

Athletic Director and Director of Coliseum 

102 Coliseum 



DEVELOPMENT AFFAIRS 



L. L. Ray, Assistont to the Chancellor in charge 
of Development and Director of Foundations 
"A" Holladay Hall 



H. W. Taylor, Director of Alumni Affairs 
Alumni Building 

Rudolph Pate, Directof of News Bureau 
101 Holladay Hall 

C. W. Hart, Assistant Director of Foundations 
Holladay Hall 

Santford Martin, Jr., Assistant in Development 
103 Pullen Hall 



BUSINESS AFFAIRS 

J. G. Vann 
Business Manager 
105 Holladay Hall 



W. M, Murray 

Assistant Business Manager 

"B" Holladay Hall 

J. M, Smith, Director 
Maintenance and Operations 
College Engineer 
Morris Building 

A. S. Sutherland 
Director of Dining Halls 
Leazor Dining Hall 



W. F. Fleming 
Purchasing Agent 
Morris Building 

James E. Fulghum 

Director of Dormitory Rentals 

4 Holladay Hall 



L .L. Ivey 

Manager of Student Stores 

YMCA Building 



COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1956-57 

FALL SEMESTER, 1956 



SeptemlitT 10 

September 10-13 
September 14 
September 15 

September 17 
September 22 
September 29 
October 6 

November 10 
November 21 

November 26 

December 15 
January 3, 1957 
January 19 
January 21-26 
January 28 



Monday 

Monday-Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Monday 
Saturday 
Saturday 
Saturday 

Saturday 
Wednesday 

Monday 



Saturday 

Thursday 

Saturday 

Monday-Saturday 

Monday 



General Faculty MeetinK. 3 P.M. 

Freshman Assembly. 7 P.M. 

Freshman Orientation and Testing 

Freshman ReKistration 

Upperclass Registration. Late Regis- 
tration of $5 payable by all 
registering after September 15. 

Classes begin 

Last Day for Registration 

Last Day to add a course 

Last Day to Drop a Course without 
Failure 

Mid-term Reports 

Thanksgiving Holiday begins at 
1 P.M. 

Classwork resumes. Last Day for 
^— w4h.drawjng from Ischool without. 
failures 

Christmas Holidays begin 

Classwork Resumes 

Last Day of Classes 

Final K.xaminations 

Awarding of Degrees for Graduating 
Students 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1957 

January 29 Tuesday 



January 30 

January 31 
February 6 
February 13 
February 20 

March 30 
April 13 

April 17 
April 26 
May 22 
May 23 
May 24-30 
May 26 



Wednesday 

Thui-sday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 

Saturday 
Saturday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday-Thursday 

Sunday 



Orientation and Testing of New 

Students 
Registration. Late registration fee 

of $5 payable by all registering 

after Januai'y 30 
Classes begin 
Last for Registration 
Last day to Add a Course 
I.,ast day to Drop a Course without 

Failure 
Mid-Term Reports 
Last day for withdrawing from 

School without failures 
Easter Holiday begins at 6 P.M. 
Classwork resumes 
Last day of Classes 
Reading day 
Final K.xaminations 
Commencement 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1957— two six-weeks sessions 



First Session 




June 3 




Monday 


June 4 




Tuesday 


June 5 




Wednesday 


June 10 




Monday 


June 14 




Friday 


July 4 




Thursday 


July 10 




Wednesday 


July 11. 


12 


Thursday & Friday 



Freshman Orientation and Testing 
Registration. Late registration fee 

of $5 payable by all registering 

after June 4 
First Day of Classes 
Last Day for Registration 
Last Day for Dropping Courses 

Without Failure 
Holiday 

I-ast Day of Classes. 
Final Examinations 



Second Session 



July 15 
July 16 



July 17 
July 22 
July 20. 



AuBUst 20 
August 21, 22 



Monday 
Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday & Thursday 



Freshman Orientation and Testing. 
Registration. Late registration fee 

of $5 payable by all registering 

after July 1(5. 
First Day of Classes 
Last Day for Registration 
Last Day for Dropping Courses 

Without Failure 
I>ast Day of Classes 
Final E.xaminations 



FALL SEMESTER, 1957 



September 16 

September 16-19 
September 20 ^ 
September 21 



September 23 
September 28 
October .5 
October 12 

November 16 
November 27 

December 2 

December 1 4 
January 3. 1958 
January 25 

January 27-Fel)ruary 1 
February 3 



Monday 

Monday-Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Monday 
Saturday noon 
Saturday noon 
Saturday noon 

Saturday 
Wednesday 

Monday 

Saturday noon 

Friday 

Saturday 

Monday-Saturday 

Monday 



General Faculty Meeting, 3 P.M. 

Freshman Assembly, 7 P.M. 

Freshman Orientation and Testing 

Freshman Regi.stration 

Upper-class Registration. Late Reg- 
istration fee of $5 payable by all 
registerini; after Sept. 21. 

Classes Regin 

Last day for Registration 

Last day to Add a Course 

Last day to drop a Course Without 
F'ailure 

Mid-term reports 

Thanksgiving Holiday Begins at 1 
P.M. 

Classwork Resumes. Last Day for 
withdrawing from School without 
failures. 

Christmas Holiday Begins 

Classwork Resumes 

Last Day of Classes 

Final Examinations 

Awarding of Degrees for Graduating 
Students 



February 4 
February 5 

February 6 
February 12 
February 19 
February 26 

March 29 
April 2 
April 10 
April 12 

May 28 
May 29 

May 30-June 5 
June 1 



Tuesday 
Wednesday 

Thursday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 

Saturday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Saturday noon 

Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday-Thursday 
Sunday 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1958 

Orientation and Testing of New 

Students 

Itegistration. Late i-egistration fee 

of $5 payable by all registering 

jifter February 5 
Classes Begin 
Last Day for Registraton 
Last Day to Add a Course 
Last Day to Drop a Course wthout 

Failure 
Mid-Term Reports 
Faster Holidays Begins at 6 P.M. 
Classwork Resumes 
Last Day for Withdrawing from 

School without Failures 
Last Day of Classes 
Reading Day 
Final Examinations 
Commencement 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1958 — two six-weeks sessions 



First Session 




June •• 


Monday 


June 10 


Tuesday 


June 11 


Wednesday 


June 16 


Monday 


June 20 


Friday 


July 4 


Friday 


July 16 


Wednesday 


July 17-18 


Thursday & Friday 



Freshman Orientation and Testing 
Registration. Late registration fee 

of $5 payable by all registering 

after June 10. 
First Day of Classes 
Last Day for Registration 
Last Day for Dropping Courses 

without Failure 
Holiday 

Last Day of Classes 
Final Examinations 



Second Session 



July 21 


July 22 


July 23 


July 28 


July 31 


August 26 


August 27-28 



Monday 
Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday & Thursday Final P^xaminations 



Freshman Orientation and Testing 
Registration. Late registration fee 

of $5 payable by all registering 

after July 22. 
First Day of Classes 
Last Day for Registration 
Last Day for Dropping Courses 

without Failure 
Last Day of Classes 



Its (N. C. State's) general purpose 
is to so teadi ilu- jjrineiples and appliea- 
tion of the sciences, illiistratino sound 
theory by daily praetiee, as to make ol 
its students uselul and surcesslul men, 
instead of mere intelligent drones. 

Alexander Qiiarles HoUaday 
President, ISSO-JSQp 




10 



Holladay Hall entrance, center of administration 




D. H. HILL LIBRARY • ONE OF SOUTHS MOST MODERN 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

I. GENERAL INFORMATION 

Page 

Heritage 12 

Services and Divisions 13 

Campus 13 

n 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

ITS HERITAGE ___ — — — — — — — — 

Nurlh ( arolina State Collejre is a foniniunity dedicated to the pursuit of 
inquiries into the nature of the world and man, and to the training of 
students in understanding and participatinj; in such inquiries. Founded 
by legislative act of March 7, 1887, it is the State's technological insti- 
tution uf higher learning and Land (Jrant College. 

Vitally important to the establishement of the College was the growing 
sentiment in North Carolina at that time to make the State more self- 
sufficient economically and less "dependent on the North for technical 
experts and manufactured articles of daily use." Further impetus was 
provided by the fact that although the Morrill Land Grant Act of 1862 
authorized the use of public land or its equivalent in land scrip for the 
creation of an agricultural college in each state, North Carolina had not 
established such a specialized institution. 

The North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts opened 
its doors for the first time on October 3, 1889, welcoming 45 students to 
a faculty of six teachers and to a campus of one building, one stable, 
two mules, one horse, and a OO-acre farm on which most of the students 
could "work out" their education. The first president was Colonel Alex- 
ander Q. Holladay, for whom the first building was later named. 

In iy:n. the General Assembly formed the Consolidated University of 
North Carolina, taking in the University at Chapel Hill, State College at 
Raleigh, and the Woman's College at Greensboro. Since consolidation, 
State College has developed rapidly to meet the growing industrial needs 
of North Carolina and the increasing interest in scientific agriculture 
within its borders. 

Following World War II, when college personnel and facilities were 
involved primarily in the national defense effort. State College witnessed 
a tremendous expansionary movement. Returning service men nearly 
tripled any previous enrollment, and today's student body has stabilized 
at twice the pre-war level. A much expanded building program has 
provided more than fifteen million dollars in augmented physical facili- 
ties, so that State College today is one of the best-housed and best- 
e(|uipp»'d technical schools in the nation. Through these expanded opera- 
tions. State College has grown in size and service to the people of North 
Carolina and in prestige throughout the nation and the world for its 
diverse programs in teaching, research and extension services. Now in 
its «;7th year of service, the College has a regular enrollment averaging 
5,000 in a %'M million plant, on a campus of 72 major buildings, seven 
schools, 48 departments, with a teaching staff of 500 and a total staff of 
nearly 2,000. including administrative, extension, and research personnel 
across the State. 

Studi-nts at State College can be justly proud of its rich heritage, 
including the well-trained alumni who are helping to build a better world 
by api)lying their technical knowledge to the variety t)f social problems 
that occur to men living in groups. Their imjjortant contributions range 
from building bridges over giant chasms to designing and constructing 
homes and buildings which are pleasant, comfortable and harmonious 
with nio«iern ways of living; from building dams and power plants which 
permit irrigation and give light and power to millions; to teaching farm- 
ers all that science has learned about agriculture; from clothing the civil- 
ized world in the finest and most durable raiment the textile industry can 
produce to preserving and replanting our forests; from building highways 
throughout the land to creating new magic in chemistry and ceramics; 
from developing and conserving our natural resources to extending the 
frontiers of knowledge about all these matters through research projects. 

12 



ITS SERVICES AND DIVISIONS 



The major objective of North Carolina State College is to provide an 
opportunity for students to obtain the hiulifst level of specialized tech- 
nical traininj:: and, at the same time, the broad general education which 
is a basic prerequisite to specialization. The CollcRe has taken the posi- 
tion that man is first a citizen and then a specialist. He must be able 
to participate as a full-fledtred member in the life of the community and 
to make informed judjrments about the trreat variety of problems which 
the citizen faces. In working toward this broad objective, State College 
is organized into seven main instructional divisions: 

School of Agriculture 

School of Design — .Architecture and Landscape Architecture 

School of Education — .Vgricultural and Industrial 

School of Engineering 

School of Poorest ry 

School of General Studies — Humanities 

School of Textiles 

With the exception of the School of General Studies, each of these 
divisions offers numerous curricula leading to baccalaureate degrees. 
These curricula are explained in detail in Part III of this bulletin. In 
addition, through its Graduate School, the College offers advanced 
degrees: Master or Master of Science in various departments of the 
Schools of Agriculture, Education, Engineering, Forestry and Textiles; 
Doctor of Philosophy in certain curricula in Agriculture, Engineering, 
and Forestry. The School of General Studies, while it does not grant 
degrees, works with all State College students in the areas of the liberal 
arts. It is that part of State College especially concerned with the nature 
of man, the ideas and institutions which he has built and which in turn 
have helped to shape his nature, the relation between him and his fellows, 
and the world in which he lives. 

Other divisions of the College are the North Carolina Agricultural 
Experiment Station, The College Extension Division, The North Carolina 
Agricultural Extension Service, and The Institute of Statistics. Allied 
agencies with headquarters on the campus include the United States 
Bureau of Mines Regional Laboratories; the state office of the Agricul- 
tural Stabilization and Consei-vation Administration; and offices of the 
State center of the United States Department of Agriculture. 

The services of State College reach the citizenry of the state through 
six principal ways: (1) resident instruction; (2) ofT-campus instruction 
in established courses through the College Extension Division; i'.i) ofT- 
campus demonstration through the Agricultural Extension Service; 
(4) special instruction in technical institutes; (5) industrial and agri- 
cultural research — both basic and applied; and (H) direct contact with the 
home through the media of radio and television. All of the research and 
instruction at State College are keyed to problems in the economic and 
cultural life of the State and region, and seek to extend the agricultural 
and industrial development of the whole area. 

— — — — — — — — — — — ITS CAMPUS 

In the broadest sense, the campus of North Carolina State College ex- 
tends, through its services, to the boundaries of the State and beyond 
into the whole southern region. But the focal center of these widespread 
activities is the college campus in Raleigh, the State's historic capital 
city, where students have access to a rich reservoir of art treasures, 
library facilities, churches, and other cultural assets. 

13 



Adjoining the central campus at Raleigh arc the college farms: 545 
acres for poultry, 1,300 acres for dairying, and additional plots allocated 
to laboratory forest woodlands, swine, beef-cattle, and sheep farms 
operated by the Department of Animal Industry, and experimental plots 
for the Horticulture Department. In addition to these holdings in the 
Raleigh area, the State College Experiment Station operates a number 
forest farms in every climatic and geographical area of the state, and 
the School of Forestry has large holdings of experimental woodlands in 
the Coastal Plain, the Piedmont, and the mountain regions of North 
Carolina. 

Recent building additions to the main campus include two new dormi- 
tories, eleven new and four renovated teaching, research-extension build- 
ings, a new library, Reynolds Coliseum, a modern College Union, and a 
nuclear reactor for the development of peacetime atomic research. The 
State College campus has grown from colonial and classical architecture 
on the old or east campus to the latest expression in modern architecture 
on the new or west campus. Good examples of the traditional east campus 
are Holladay and Pullen. Good examples of the modern west campus are 
the College Union and Burlington Laboratory. 

Of the buildings, new and old, a few deserve special mention: 
The Memorial Tower ... a 116-foot campanile of w-hite Mount Airy 
granite, designed by William Deacy, begun by alumni in 1921 as a monu- 
ment to the 33 State College men who lost their lives in World War I, 
expanded in 1937, and completed in 1949. 

Andrew Johnson House . . . birthplace (1808) of the 17th President of 
the United States, a tiny, gambrel-roof frame structui'e, removed from 
original site on Fayetteville Street to Pullen Park, and in 1937 moved 
here (admission on application to keeper). 

Holladay Hall . . . oldest building on campus, once the total college 
plant, now completely remodeled inside, housing central administration. 
The YMCA ... a traditional landmark in the heart of the old campus, 
recently remodeled, serving the religious and social life of the college. 
William Neal Reynolds Coliseum . . . one of America's largest indoor 
stadiums, seating 12,500 for sports events and more for stage events 
using the floor, attracting nation-wide basketball games, ice-shows, 
agricultural meetings, symphonies, variety shows, and lecturers. 
Burlington Laboratory . . . home of the Nuclear Reactor, which has at- 
tracted national attention as first nuclear pile to be used entirely for 
teaching and research, first to be operated on any college campus as a 
non-AEC reactor, first to be open for public inspection. 
D. H. Hill Library ... a modern building providing shelves for 400,000 
volumes, designed to seat 900 readers, witli dozens of private study 
carrells and conference rooms and well-lighted-vcntilatcd reading rooms. 
Collection now 140,000 excluding gov't documents and pamphlets. 
College Union . . . one of nation's most modern student-faculty activities 
centers, with a main lounge, cloak room, snack bar, dining room, 2 private 
banquet rooms, ballroom, self-operating elevator, several telephones, 
direct telegraph connection. TV sets. Quiet Room, library game room, 
barber shop, 100-seat theater, private rooms with a private balcony, 7 
meeting rooms, and hobby shop. 

The Print Shop . . . one of the finest college printing plants in the nation, 
using one of the larger cylinder presses, automatic stapling and folding 
equipment, and other regular presses, linotype machines and equipment 
for printing, binding, designing, and i-uling. 

Clark Infirmary and Leazar Dining Hall . . . modern buildings, well- 
equipped for their sei-vices to the student body. 

Other points of interest . . . are the modern greenhouses accompanying 
Williams, Gardner, and Kilgore halls; Animal Disease Laboratory, Pulp 
and Paper Laboratory, and TV Studios along Western Boulevard, Frank 
Thompson (Jym and Riddick Stadium. 

14 



^^^<^"4^^^\''^;?^^'^ -^^:iy^i^S^^ 



May it (N. C. State) rejoice in 
work, not dreaming dreams but 
doing deeds. 

May it ennoble toil, aboHsh 
drudgery, harness nature to luun.tn 
service, and ( ic-.iie lor all uiaiikiiid 
larger and belter lu-altli, ueallli, 
comiort, and happiness! 

May its mission in lile. its 
acliicvements in education, its l)ril- 
liant guiding star be the wise words 
ol the sacred seer: riiere is noth- 
ing better than thai a ui.iu should 
rejoice in his work"' 

Ci('i>)i!;<' r(i\l(>t' ]\ iit.slon 
PrcJclrnl. IS<f<}-IQ()S 



15 




.jj^jimLir^ 



16 



West side of Owen Dormitory for men 




THE COLLEGE UNION 



A HOME AWAY FROM HOME 



II. REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES 

FOR STUDENTS 



Page 

Admission Requirements 18 

Residence 20 

Grades and Scholarships 20 

Tuition and Fees 22 

Student Activities and Services 25 

17 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS —_ — __ — — - 

First, an application form must be submitted. These forms, which indi- 
cate completely what information is required, may be obtained from and 
should be submitted to: 

Director of Admissions 
Holladay Hall 

North Carolina State College 
Kaleigh, North Carolina 

Applications for admission will be considered between February 1 and 
September 1 for the fall semester; and between October 1 and January 1 
for the spring semester. For admission of Graduate Students, see the 
special catalog of the Graduate School which may be obtained from: 

Dr. D. B. Anderson, Dean of the Graduate School 

Gardner Hall 

North Carolina State College 

Kaleigh, North Carolina 

Courses of study at North Carolina State College assume the entering 
student has competence in oral and written expression, efficient study 
and reading skills, the mathematical skills normally gained in secondary 
school instruction, and broad preparation in approved fields of study. 
By recent action of the Board of Trustees all students entering any unit 
of the Consolidated University in September, 1957, and later will be 
required to show competence by making satisfactory scores on entrance 
examinations. 

The College enrolls undergraduate students in four classifications: 
regular (degree-seeking students); special (no college credit); unclassi- 
fied (may be changed subsequently to regular status using credits earned 
while unclassified); and auditor (no credit). 

To be admitted to a department as a regular, degree-seeking student, 
freshmen must submit a certificate of graduation from an accredited 
high school or, in the case of graduation from a non-acci-edited high 
school, pass a special entrance examination. Regular, degree-seeking 
transfer students must present off^icial transcripts of work taken at other 
institutions. Detailed regulations which apply in all cases are discussed 
in the following paragraphs and should be examined carefully by the 
prospective student. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE OF GRADUATION — — — — — - 

The applicant should be (a) at least K! years of age; (b) of sound 
moral character; and (c) the graduate of an accredited high school. He 
should present at least 15 units of completed high school work, 8% 
of which are distributed as follows: 

English (or English and Speech) 4 units (see below) 
Mathematics 2V2 to 4 units (see below) 

History and Social Science 1 or 2 units (see below) 

Natural Science 1 or 2 units 

The remainder of the 15 units will be accepted from other courses, except 
that not more than one unit will be accepted from activity courses such as 
physical education, music, band, or military science. 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

All students entering North Carolina State College for the first time are 
tested for their proficiency in using the English language. Students 
deficient in this area are required to take a special non-credit course in 
English composition and to make satisfactory progress in the work before 
taking the regular credit course in English. Students who make high 

18 



marks on this examination and who demonstrate unusual proficiency in 
special written exercises may be excused from taking the regular credit 
course in English composition. Instead, they receive credit for the course 
and proceed to advanced courses. 

Foreign students who do not have a satisfactory command of English 
are required to take special courses in English for Foreign Students 
until they are skillful enough in the language to continue their work. 
MATHEMATICAL PREPARATION 

Since mathematics is of such great importance in jirescnt-day technical 
curricula, State College requirements are somewhat rigorous in this area 
of the student's preparation. One and one-half units of algebra and one 
unit of plane geometry are considereil minimum preparation for all 
curricula. Students presenting only one unit of algebra or no plane 
geometry must take special non-credit courses to meet these deficiences. 
Courses scheduled to meet deficiencies in these areas will not carry 
college credit. Registration in regular college courses in mathematics 
will be delayed until this work is completed. Students in Engineering, 
Architecture, Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural and Biological 
Chemistry, and Mathematics Education are required to present solid 
geometry for admission. A special non-credit course is offered for appli- 
cants who have not taken the work in high school. This deficiency must 
be removed before the student begins his regular mathematics sequence 
in curricula named. It is wise for the student planning to enter any of 
these curricula to make every effort to complete required courses in 
mathematics in high school before applying to State College, or to take 
them in summer school, or by correspondence, at the College prior to 
entering as a freshman in the fall. 
HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

If the student does not offer American History for admission, he must 
complete one semester of American History or American Government as 
part of his college program. If he is officially registered for the course, 
he will receive college credit for it. F'oreign students are required to 
complete a course in American History before graduation. 

_ — _ ADMISSION BY SPECIAL EXAMINATION 

Students who have been graduated from non-accredited high schools and 
mature students who have not completed high school work may qualify 
for acceptance as students working for a degree by passing entrance 
examinations. These examinations will cover approximately the work 
expected of regular high school graduates. 

_ — — — ADMISSION AS A MATURE SPECIAL STUDENT 

Mature students who do not wish to work for a degree may be admitted 
to the college in this category upon recommendation of the Dean of the 
school concerned and upo)i submission of satisfactory records of education 
and experience. The usual college entrance requirements may be waived 
for mature students, but regular college rules of scholarsiiip will apply 
after admission. The special stuflent may not represent the College in 
any inter-collegiate contest or become a member of any fraternity, pro- 
fessional or social. 
_ ADMISSION AS AN UNCLASSIFIED STUDENT 

.Admission as an unclassified student requires the recommendation of the 
Dean of the school in which the student wishes to enroll. Unclassified 
students must meet the same requirements as regular students and 
must adhere to the rules and regulations of the College. If at a later date 
an unclassified student wishes to change to regular status, his credits 
must be evaluated for his major. Credits earned by the student while he 
is unclassified will be accepted only if he has completed the proper 
prerequisites. Where credit is allowed, the student will receive the grades 
he earned in the courses accepted for credit. 

19 



AbMISSiON BY PRESENTING EVIDENCE OF CREDIT EARNED FROM 

ANOTHER ACCREDITED INSTITUTION OF HIGHER LEARNING — — — 

All students who transfer to State College from other colleges must 
present official transcripts of work taken at the other institutions. A 
complete separate, official transcript must be sent directly to the Ad- 
missions Office from each institution attended. The prospective transfer 
student must be eligible to return to the institution last attended. The 
student's record, if of average grade or above, will be evaluated by the 
Dean or Director of Instruction of the School in which the student wishes 
to register. A $2.00 transcript evaluation fee, payable to the Office of 
Registration, is charged for this service. Evaluation by the school will 
be final. Students whose records show below average work cannot be 
admitted to State College unless such admission is approved by the Ad- 
missions Committee. Failure of the student to present ti'anscripts from 
all colleges previously attended may result in his dismissal from College. 

ADMISSION AS AN AUDITOR — — — — — — — — — 



Students who wish to audit courses must obtain the permission of the 
instructor and depai'tment head and register through the Office of 
Registration. The participation of auditors in class discussion or in 
tests or examinations is optional with the insti'uctor. Auditors receive 
no credit for the course; they are, however, expected to attend classes 
regularly, 

RESIDENCE ____________ 

State College is unable to accept all the out-of-state applicants for 
admission. By trustee action, the College can accept only highly qualified 
out-of-state students. The administration has ruled that all students 
whose parents have not been domiciled in North Carolina for more than 
six months immediately preceding the day of their first enrollment in 
the institution shall be termed out-of-state students, with the following 
exceptions: 

Students twenty-one years of age at the time of their first 
matriculation who have resided in North Carolina for moi'e than 
one year, other than by virtue of attendance at another college 
or temporary military assignment, preceding the day of their 
first enrollment. 

Children of regular employees of the Federal Government sta- 
tioned in the State of North Carolina; and 

Children of regular employees of the Federal Government 
who are employed outside of the State, but who through law are 
permitted to retain their North Carolina citizenship. 

The furnishing of incomplete or incorrect information regarding 
residence may result in the student's dismissal from college. 

The Registration Office determines each student's residence status 
on the basis of existing information and interpretation of regulations. 
Appeals from such classification may be made to the Consolidated 
University Administration on forms obtainable from the Registration 
Office. 



GRADES AND SCHOLARSHIP - 



North Carolina State College operates on a credit-point system. Semester 
credits represent the number of hours of work completed; quality points 
are determined by the grades earned. 

20 



A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Average 


D 


Passing 


F 


FailinK 


Inc 


Incomplete 



4 quality points for each credit hour. 
3 quality points for each credit hour. 
2 quality points for each credit hour. 
1 quality point for each credit hour. 
quality point for each credit hour. 



Abs. Absent from examination 



EXPLANATIONS 



At the discretion of the teacher, a student who has at least a C average 
in a course may be given an incomplete grade for work not completed 
because of a serious interruption in the student's work not caused by his 
own negligence. An incomplete grade must be made up during the next 
semester the student is in residence, unless the department involved is 
not able to allow the make-up. In this latter case, the department will 
notify the student and the Office of Registration when the incomplete 
must be made up. Any incomplete not removed during the period specified 
by the department will automatically become a failure and will be re- 
corded as **Fi". 

A grade of "Fa" as recorded for an unexcused absence from examina- 
tion. If an absence from examination is excused by the Dean of Students, 
the student must take the examination during the next semester he is in 
residence or a grade of "Fa" will be recorded. 

A grade of "Fd" is posted if a student has unofficially dropped a course 
for which he has been scheduled, oi- if he had officially dropped after the 
final date for dropping courses without failure. A failure may be made 
up only by repeating the subject. Such a repeat course must be regularly 
scheduled on the student's roster. 

NOTE: Any student who fails a course within two semesters of grad- 
uation and who fails only one course during that semester may apply to 
the Office of Registration for permission to remove that failure by stand- 
ing for reexamination on the total subject matter of the course. 

If a senior fails more than one course during the semester and removes 
all but one of these deficiencies by repeating the course or courses, and if 
he has not had another reexamination, he may apply at the end of his last 
semester in residence for permission to take a reexamination. 

When such a reexamination is taken to remove an "F", only the re- 
examination will be counted. .And a senior who has passed a reexamina- 
tion will have his grade for this course changed from "F" to "R", which 
is equivalent in (juality points to a grade of "D". A fee of $5.00 will be 
charged for such a reexamination. 

During the first two years of residence at this institution and the sum- 
mer sessions immediatelv following (or until 05 semester hours have been 
earned in residence and/or by transfer), students may repeat courses 
passed for the purpose of improving their understanding of the basic 
subject matter. Such a repeat must be made in the next subsequent 
semester in which the course is offered. When a course is repeated, both 
grades will be considered in the college scholarship standards. Thereafter 
a student may repeat a course previously passed only by auditing the 
course. At the student's request, the teacher may allow an auditor full 
participation in all class activities. Courses audited will count the same 
as credit courses in computing a student's academic load. 

Students progress from one class to a higher class after they have 
completed the required number of hours for the higher classification. 
At the present time students are classified at the beginning of the fall 
semester and at no other time. 

21 



140 or more semester hours 

1-29 semester hours of earned credit 
30-64 semester hours of earned credit 
65-99 semester hours of earned credit 

credit 
100 or more semester hours of earned 



Freshman 
Sophomore 
Junior 
Senior 

Professional (School of Design) 

At the end of his freshman year, a student must have an over-all 1.5 
average (1% times as many quality points as total hours cai-ried) to be 
eligible to continue. A freshman must meet this requirement by the end 
of the summer after he has completed two full semesters (not necessarily 
both in one school year or at this institution.) 

At the end of his sophomore year, and each succeeding year, a student 
must have an over-all 2.0 average (twice as many quality points as 
total hours carried) to be eligible to continue. A student must meet this 
requirement for the first time by the end of the summer after he has com- 
pleted four full semesters (not necessarily all in two school years). A 
transfer student (with or without credit) who has attended some other 
college as much as two semesters must meet this requirement the first 
both in one school year or at this institution). 

Any student who falls below a 1.5 average for the work scheduled for 
any semester will be placed on scholastic probation, and will have his 
course load for the succeeding semester regulated by his Dean or Di- 
rector of Instruction. A student is scholastically eligible for graduation 
when he has satisfied all the specific requirements of his department, 
the School, and the College, and has at least a C avei*age, twice as many 
quality points as total credit hours taken. 

TUITION AND FEES — — — — — _____ 

Charges for tuition and fees vary according to (1) the student's status 
as a resident or non-resident of North Carolina at the time of his first 
enrollment; (2) type of student (regular undergraduates, special or 
unclassified undergraduate, auditor or graduate student); and (3) to 
a minor degree the curriculum in which the student is enrolled. 

An application for admission must be accompanied by an application 
fee of $5. This fee is refunded to students whose applications are not ap- 
proved. It is forfeited by applicants who are accepted but who do not 
enroll. 

Tuition and fees are payable in advance each semester, prior to regis- 
tration day, upon receipt of a statement from the College Cashier 
(students desiring to do so may pay monthly installments, upon approval 
of application to Business Office.) All charges are subject to change 
without notice, but the charges in effect currently are as follows: 

Regular Undergraduate Students: 

School In-State Students Out-of-State Students 

First Second First Second 

Semester Semester Semester Semester 

Agriculture $145 $138 $320 $313 

Design 144 138 319 313 
Education: 

Agricultural Education 145 138 320 313 

Others 142 136 317 311 

Engineering 144 138 319 313 

Forestry 154 138* 329 313* 

Textiles 144 138 319 313 

* Add $10 if not registered in first semester. 



22 



Late Hej^istration Fee — All students, graduate and undergraduate, who 
fail to registt-r on dates scheduled must pay a $5.00 late registration fee. 
Special and Unclassified Students: 

These students, if living- in the college community or registering for 
more than six hours of course work, will pay full undergraduate tuition 
and fees. If living outside the college community and carrying six hours 
or less, these students will pay each semester a registration fee of $5, 
plus $7.50 per credit hour if residents of North Carolina or $15.00 per 
credit hour if non-residents. 
Auditors: 

Subject to academic regulations regularly enrolled undergraduate stu- 
dents may audit courses without additional charge. Those not regularly 
enrolled, or registering for audits only, will pay the rates applicable to 
special or unclassified students. 
Graduate Students: 

Applicants interested in graduate work may receive a schedule of fees 
upon application to the Graduate School. 
Commencement fee: 

A fee of $7, covering cost of diploma and rental of cap and gown, is 
charged candidates for the baccalaureate degree during the last semester 
before the degree is awarded. 
Deposits: 

(a) As partial security for military uniforms, library books, labora- 
tory equipment, etc., a general deposit of $20 is required to be paid 
by regularly enrolled undergraduate students at the time of their first 
enrollment (see also under "Refunds"). 

(b) Certain departments are allowed to collect small deposits in ad- 
dition to the general deposit referred to above, for such things as room 
keys, lockers, etc. In such instances departmental regulations will apply. 
Staff: 

Full-time staff members may register for course work at a flat rate of 
$15 per semester. The number of courses allowable will be limited by 
administrative regulations. This payment does not include non-academic 
fees, and none of the privileges attendant upon the payment of such 
fees are allowed. 
Audits: 

Subject to academic regulations, regularly enrolled graduate or under- 
graduate students may audit courses by registering for them. The first 
audit will be disregarded in determination of course load on which tuition 
and fee payments are based, but any additional audits are to be added 
to the course load at full credit hour value. Students registered for 
audits only will pay the rates applicable to special or unclassified 
students. Full-time staff members may register for and audit one course 
per semester without charge. 
Professional students in engineering: 

Students in the various fifth-year professional curricula described on 
pages 13:5-1:54 of catalog will be charged on same basis as "Special and 
Unclassified Students." 
Thesis preparation: 

Graduate students who have completed course requirements and are in 
residence for thesis work only will be charged $15 per semester for 
tuition, plus all non-academic fees. Graduate students in residence will 
not be permitted to register "for thesis work only" for two consecutive 
semesters. Graduate students not in residence who have completed all 
requirements for the degree sought except for the thesis will be required 
to register for the term in which final requirements for the degree are 
to be completed and to pay $10 tuition fee. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — ROOM RENT 

Rooms in the College dormitories rent for $69.50 including a key deposit 
of $2.00 per student semester. Janitorial sei-vice is supplied, but each 

2? 



student is required to furnish his own linens, blankets, and pillow. Room 
rent is payable in advance prior to the beginning of each semester, at 
times announced by the Supervisor of Dormitory Rentals. Room rent 
is charged strictly on a semester basis. If a student occupying a room 
during the first semester reserves and pays rent for the second semester, 
he may leave his belongings in the room between semesters. If, however, 
a student occupying a room during the first semester does not reserve 
it for the second semester, he must vacate the room and turn in his keys 
at the end of the first semester. Rent will be charged at the rate of $1.00 
per day between terms and until the room is vacated and the key turned 
in. All rooms must be completely vacated and keys turned in at the 
end of the second semester, except those rooms which have been reserved 
for the summer session. These rooms must be vacated at the end of the 
summer session. 
BOARD _________ _______ 

Meals are served cafeteria style, and the cost depends upon the in- 
dividual student. Average cost would be approximately $500 per year. 
BOOKS AND SUPPLIES ____ — — ___ ___. 

The cost for books and supplies is variable, depending upon the curricu- 
lum in which the student is enrolled. A reasonable estimate would be 
$75 per year, but students who have to buy drawing supplies and slide 
rules have an additional original outlay. All books and supplies are 
paid for in cash as purchased. 
ESTIMATED ANN UAL COST _ — — ___ — _— __ 

Total expenses of a full-time student from North Carolina, exclusive of 
clothing, pocket money, travel, and other incidentals, need not exceed 
$1,100. Out-of-state students will need an additional $350. 
PAYMENT SCHEDULE _________ ____ 

Tuition and fees are payable in advance each term, on registration day. 
Students desiring to do so may pay on an installment basis, but must 
apply to the Business Office for such privilege prior to registration day. 
A service charge of $1 per semester is made for this arrangement. Any 
payment, either regular or installment, not made when due requires an 
additional late payment charu'c of $1. 
LATE REGISTRATION _________ ____ 

Registiation schedules are set for specific days, and certain definite pro- 
cedures arc outlined. A student has not completed registration until all 
the required steps aie taken. All students, giaduate and undergraduate, 
who fail to register on dates scheduled must pay a $5.00 late registration 
fee. 

REFUNDS __ — — __ — _—___ — __ 
TUITION AND FEES 

A student who withdraws from school on or before the last day for 
registration will receive a refund of the full amount paid, less a $5 
registi-ation fee. On withdrawal later than the period specified, no re- 
fund will be made. 

ROOM RENT 

A student who withdraws from school will receive a refund of the 
amount paid for room rent, less $1.00 per day for the time the room is 
occupied. A student who vacates his room for any reasonl wil receive no 
refund. 

GENERAL DEPOSIT 

The general deposit is refunded when a student has completed the re- 
quirements for a degree or has (Iropi)ed out of school. The student must 
apply to the Business Office for the refund. Refund will be made by check 
within .30 days after the application is received. 
REFUND COMMITTEE 

In some instances circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding 
refunds. An example might be withdrawal from school, because of 
illness. Students have the privilege of appeal to the Refund Committee 
when they feel that special consideration is merited. Applications for 
such appeals may be secured from the Dean of Students. 
24 



- — — — — - STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES 

State Collejre makes every effort to provide the student with surround- 
int?s which are pleasant and conducive to intellectual jrrowth. Respecting 
the student as an individual, the collejre assures him the maximum of per- 
sonal liberty within the limits necessary for orderly progression of class- 
work and consistent with respect for the rights of others. In return, he 
is expected to pay serious attention to his purpose in attending college 
and to observe rules of conduct consistent with maturity. Through the 
various services and activities identified with everyday life on the 
campus, as well as through the several extracurricular organizations and 
functions, the student at State College has excellent opportunity for 
acquiring experience in group leadership and community living which 
he may take with him into his professional career. 

As the student progresses in his development, especially after his fresh- 
man year, he will find many opportunities to increase his growth in 
citizenship by participating in the activities of his academic class and 
of the student body in general. Following is a survey of the various 
activities at State College. 

— — — — — — STUDENT GOVERNMENT AND HONOR SYSTEM 

When he enters State College, the student becomes a member of a self- 
governing community. 

Legislative, executive, and judicial authority, insofar as student affairs 
are concerned, rests with the Student Government which operates within 
the framework of over-all college Administration. The Student Govern- 
ment members and Judicial Board members are elected in campus-wide 
elections. The Student has a voice in his own government by participating 
in these elections. Often in general elections he is asked to vote on pro- 
posed changes in regulations which affect the student body or on changes 
in the Student Government constitution. 

The student also becomes part of an Honor System which expects him 
to adhere to its general aims: honesty in classwork and honor in general 
conduct. 

— — — —___ — — — — — CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 
Through the various honorary, professional and technical, and social 

organizations at State, the interested students find many opi)ortunities to 

participate in activities that appeal to them and to meet others who have 

similar interests. 

College Honorary 

Golden Chain — Senior leadership 

Blue Key -Junior leadership 

Thirty -and-Three — Sophomore leadership 

Phi Eta Sigma — Freshman scholarship 

Phi Kappa Phi — Scholarship, Seniors and Graduate Students 

Professional and Technical 

Each school at State College sjjonsors or supervises a large number of 
professional and technical societies and clubs. Students in every area of 
instruction are encouraged to join with their fellow students in pursuing 
their common interests. Many of these organizations contribute greatly 
to the student's professional and social growth. 
Social Fraternitie.s 

Seventeen national social fraternities have chapters at State College. 
Each has two representatives on the Interfraternity Council, which has 
as its objectives promoting the general interests and welfare of the 
associated fraternities and insuring cooperation between them in their 
relations with the faculty, the student body, and the public in general. 

— — — — — — — — — — — _ STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

State College has a large number and variety of publications, both 

general and School-sponsored, edited and managed by student officers, 
with faculty members serving as advisers. Any student who wishes to 

25 



may gain journalistic experience and training in writing, editing, or 
managing regular journals and annuals. 

The three general publications, The Agromeck, The Student Broad- 
casting System and The Technician are supported in large part by a 
publication fee, which is a part of each student's fees. 

The Agromeck is the College Yearbook, providing a record of the 
classes and of the principal events of the school year. It recalls in 
pictures the varied activities of the student body throughout the year. 
The Agromech is published for the entire student body under the sponsor- 
ship of the senior class. 

Although it is not a "publication" in the strictest sense of the word 
The Student Broadcasting System, a carrier-current station with cover- 
age limited to the campus, serves the same function through a different 
medium. It offers many opportunities for extra-curricular training in 
actual bi'oadcasting techniques as well as training in administration and 
program planning. A member of the Intercollegiate Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, the station is now preparing to receive and rebroadcast programs 
from other colleges and universities. 

The Technician is the student newspaper, issued once a week and 
delivered to the dormitories and fraternity houses. Students living off 
the campus receive their copies of the newspaper by mail. The Technician 
serves as a forum for student expression as well as a medium for news 
of particular interest to State College students. Each incoming student 
receives a copy of The Tower, the College handbook, which contains 
detailed information about student organizations and activities. 

Several of the Schools have their own publications, which are pub- 
lished under the general supervision of the particular School and deal 
with material of special interest to students in that School. 

These publications include The Agriculturist, published by the School 
of Agriculture; The PI-NE-TVM, published by the School of Forestry; 
The Southern Engineer, published by the School of Engineering; The 
Textile Forum, published by the School of Textiles; and the Publications 
of the School of Design. 

ATHLETICS — — — — — — — — — _ — _ — — — 

In addition to voluntary programs of intramural and intercollegiate 
sports. State College requires freshmen and sophomores to enroll in 
credit courses in physical education. 
INTRAMURAL 

The college maintains an extensive program of intramural sports 
which is administered by the Department of Physical Education. Par- 
ticipation in these sports is purely voluntary; it does not receive college 
credit. Competition in twelve sports is engaged in by dormitory and 
fraternity leagues. 

Sports used in the intramural program are correlated with those used 
in the required class work in physical education. Instruction in the sports 
is given in the classes, and opportunity for competition is provided in the 
intramural program. Winners in these competitions are awarded cups, 
shields, and trophies. An Intramural Advisory Board composed of repre- 
sentative students assists the director of the intramural program. 

For intramural competition as well as for classes in physical education, 
Frank Thompson Gymnasium has a swimming pool, a large playing area 
for basketball, an auxiliary gymnasium with three handball courts, a 
room for wrestling, a locker room, and showers. Several fields are pro- 
vided for intramural and recreational play. Five semi-hard-surface and 
nine hard-surface courts are available for tennis, with additional courts 
contemplated. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Intercollegiate athletics at State College come under the supervision of 
a separate department of the college; policies governing intercollegiate 

26 



competition are recommended however, by the Athletic Council, composed 
of faculty, students, and alumni, in full accord with Atlantic Coast 
Conference rules of eligibility for intercoUeRiate contests. Membership 
of the Atlantic Coast Conference comprises, in addition to State, Uuke, 
Wake Forest, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Mary- 
land, Clenison, and South Carolina. 

The program in intercollegiate athletics consists of the organization 
and training of "Wolfpack" teams in football, basketball, baseball, track 
cross country, wrestling, swimming, tennis, golf, soccer, fencing, and 
rifle competition. ,t , ■• , o^ r 

Facilities for intercollegiate athletics at State include Kiddick Stadium, 
a 20 000-seat stadium for football; William Xeal Reynolds Coliseum, a 
12,000-seat arena for basketball; a 1.200-seat stadium for track; a 2,500- 
seat for baseball; four football practice fields; 12 tennis courts; a 25-yard 
swimming pool in Frank Thompson Gymnasium; and facilities in the 
Coliseum for wrestling, fencing, and other sports. 

_________ — — — — — — — MUSIC 

Students with previous experience find at State College many oportuni- 
ties to continue their music, both vocal and instrumental. The State 
College Band and the Drum and Bugle Corps furnish music for all 
military parades by the ROTC. Freshmen and sophomores who are ac- 
cepted on the basisof auditions and band requirements may enroll in the 
Band and receive credit for requireil military drill. The Band plays and 
marches at football games and at other campus and civic aff'airs. Mem- 
bership in the Band comprises both ROTC and non-ROTC bandsmen. 
After football season, the Band becomes the Concert Band, which plays 
frequent concerts on the campus. Credit is offered in the third and fourth 
years of participation. 

The Concert Orchestra is composed of State College students and a 
number of Raleigh musicians. The orchestra presents frequent concerts, 
and smaller units from it provide music for numerous College functions. 

The Men's Glee Club alternates with the orchestra and bands in giving 
concerts both on the campus and out of town. 
___________ ____ STUDENT CENTERS 

Students at State College find that a great deal of their extracurricular 
activity centers around two buildings, the College YMCA and the College 
Union. The YMCA has long served the College as a social and recrea- 
tional center. With the completion of the new College Union Building, 
facilities for student affairs have been tremendously expanded. For the 
past several years the College Union has provided State College students 
with entertainment and with opportunities and facilities for recreation 
and relaxation. In l!t54. for the first time, the Union had a building of 
its own. The newly completed building, n-alization of a dream of many 
years, offers to both students and faculty a variety of features. On the 
ground fioor are a snack bar, a small dining room, game rooms, a barber 
shop, and free telephones. The main tloor has an assembly and ballroom, 
a library, lounges, a gallery area for exhiliits, and facilities for two small 
dining rooms. The second floor contains the College Union oflices. a photo- 
graphic darkroom, guest rooms, a quiet room, a room for listening to 
music, a theatre, a workshop, meeting rooms, and student organization 
offices. 

The College Union serves a great many purposes. Its most olwious 
function is to provide a center where students can have fun and meet 
their friends. Through its widely varied program, however, it serves a 
deeper function— by introducing the student to the art of leisure-time 
living and by providing opportunities for leadership. Further, the College 
Union provides a showcase where students may display their talent in the 
form of exhibits, workshops, and entertainment which they have pro- 

27 



duced. Each student is invited to work on one of the College Union com- 
mittees and to take an active part in the Union program. 

In addition to the functions and activities housed in the College Union 
Building, many other activities, especially those of a religious, spiritual, 
and devotional nature, are sponsored by the State College YMCA and 
are held within its facilities. It offers to the students an attractive lobby 
equipped with writing and reading tables and comfortable chairs, a 
television room, four conference rooms where student and faculty groups 
may meet, a small auditorium, and a recreation room. 

The Danforth Chapel provides a place for religious services and medi- 
tation for all faiths. 

The YMCA plans social events and lectures on various topics related 
to student life in addition to, or in connection with, its programs of 
religious emphasis. 

In addition to those offered by the YMCA and the College Union build- 
ings, many other services and facilities for which there has been a long 
felt need at State College are provided in the new D. H. Hill Library. 

The D. H. Hill Library, which started serving students and faculty 
in the fall of 1954, was designed to provide space for all the varied func- 
tions that a modern library must perform. Ample stacks were so planned 
that the present collection of 157,000 books and over 3,000,000 documents 
could be quadrupled and still housed properly, that photoprinting and 
microfilming could become a feature of the library service, that the peri- 
odicals, numbering nearly 2,000 currently received, could be effectively 
processed and displayed, and that the building could be a welcome and 
satisfactory working center for the faculty and the students. 

In the attractive lobby of the building there is arranged a collection 
of books for recreational reading. Students may explore this area as they 
please and check out the books of their choice. The big West Reading 
Room, colorful, well-lighted and interesting, is an invitation to study, 
and on the top floor is a special smaller study open to the students who 
prefer to work in a more secluded place. For the graduate students there 
are desks and private lockers in the stacks and, adjoining the ground 
floor stacks, a large and pleasant room wheie faculty members and grad- 
uate students may smoke and read. In addition to these facilities, there 
are several conference rooms open to any college groups requesting 
them, several rooms which can be temporarily assigned to faculty 
members, and, on the second floor, a room containing a rental typewriter 
available to any person in need of one. The Library is certainly a place 
for work, for acquiring technical knowledge; it can also be a place for 
discovering all the wealth of pleasure and of widened understanding 
which books can bring to the student who decides he does indeed desire to 
become a man of education and of stature. 
HOUSING — — — — — —— — — — — — — — — 

At State, the dormitory is considered something more than merely a 
suitable place for living and studying. A well-organized dormitory pro- 
gram plays an inpgrtant lole in the student's all-around development. 
Under the program, each dormitory is organized much like a club, with 
ofl^icers elected by the residents, and paid student managers recommended 
by the dormitory ofi'icers and approved by the college. Each student 
is encouraged to participate in the athletic, social, and recreational ac- 
tivities of his dormitory and in this way to have opportunity to meet 
and make friends with students of variant backgrounds, to use his leisure 
time pleasantly and profitably, and to grow in personality. Each dormi- 
tory elects its representatives to the Interdormitory Council, a student 
organization which coordinates interdormitory activities and programs. 
In each of six major dormitories a faculty couple occupy an apartment 
and act as host and hostess. They assist the occupants with their prob- 
lems and provide a pleasing atmosphere in which the parents and friends 
of the occupants can visit the dormitory. 

28 



The Collefre has no dormitory for women students. Co-eds must make 
their own housing arranfremt'nts. A list of available rooms for rent is 
maintained at the Dormitory Rental Office in Room 4, Holladay Hall. 

For the married veteran, the eolleiire has units equipped for family 
livinjr located in Vetville. Vetville has its own community government 
with officers elected by the residents. 

During: the U)55-5() academic year, approximately :}50 students lived in 
off-campus residences maintained hy the seventeen social fraternities 
which have chapters at State C'ollejre. Each chapter is represented in the 
Inter-Fraternity Council, which sponsors athletic events and social func- 
tions of particular interest to fraternity members. 

-_ — — — _____ _ ___ FOOD SERVICES 

The State College student does not have to travel far for food, whether 
it is a full meal or a between-class snack. 

Leazar Hall, the main dining hall, provides four cafeteria lines where 
the student may secure nutritious food at reasonable prices. The cafe- 
teria will accommodate l,t>00 people an hour. 

The new College Union building offers dining room facilities for groups 
and a snack bar. Shuttle Inn in the Textile Building serves sandwiches 
and light meals. Shuttle Inn is operated by the Student Supply Store. 

In addition, each dormitory area has its own snack bar, also operated by 
the Student Supply Store system. 

-_ — _ — — — — — — LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING 



The college laundry provides on-campus laundry and dry-cleaning 
service on a cash-and-carry basis for both students and staff at in- 
expensive rates. 

— — — — _________ BARBER SERVICE 

Two barber shops are provided, one in the YMCA Building and one in 
the College Union. 

— — — — — — — — — — __ BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 



Watat(ga Book Shop. All required textbooks and other books of current 
and permanent interest can be purchased in Watauga Book Shop, housed 
in the basement of Watauga Hall. 

Hook Exchange. Alpha Zeta, student honor fraternity, maintains a book 
exchange in I'Jll Building where students may exchange or sell used 
books. 

General Supplies. The Student Supply Store, located in the basement 
of the YMCA Building, stocks a wide variety of general items which 
the student will need, including drawing instruments, writing supplies, 
and incidentals. 

— — — — — —— — — — — — — — — HEALTH 

The college seeks to safeguard the health of the student in every way 
possible. It maintains a 7fi-bed infirmary, open 24 hours a day, with a 
staff of nine: the college physician, a supervising nurse, a night super- 
visor, five general duty nurses, and one full-time laboratory and X-ray 
technician. .Among the many valuable features of the infirmary are an 
up-to-date first aid department and X-ray department. 

The college physician observes regular daily office hours in the in- 
firmary, in the mornings, with afternoon visits on Sunday. In addition, 
he visits the infirmary more often wheij necessary. A graduate nurse is 
on duty day and night. Students have free access to the infirmary at all 
times. 

In case of accident or serious illness of a student, parents or guardians 
will be notified immediately by the Director of Student Personnel. No 

29 



surg:ical operation will be performed without full consent of parents or 
guardians, except in cases of extreme emergency. 

The medical fee which each student pays provides for infirmary service, 
jjeneral medical treatment, and for the services of nurses. It does not 
provide surgical opeiations, outside hospital care, or the sei'vices of 
dentists or othei- specialists. 

Before the student enters college he should have a complete, thorough 
examination by his family physician. Any abnormality should be noted 
and all remedial defects corrected in order to prevent unnecessary loss 
of time while the student is in college. If the examination is not done 
before he enters, the student will be given a physical examination at the 
college, for which a fee is charged. Blanks for the physical examination 
can be secured from the Office of Registration. 

Student Government sponsors annually a plan of students' accident 
insurance. During 1955-56, arrangements were in effect with the Pilot 
Life Insurance Company whereby an accident policy costing $7.00 per 
year for male students and $5.00 per year for female students was 
available on an optional basis. It is planned to have a similar policy 
available each year for which complete information will be furnished 
students before the opening of school. 
ORIENTATION — — — — — — — — — — — __ — 

Several days before the registration of upperclassmen in the fall 
semester, freshmen arrive on the college campus for a series of activities 
known as Freshman Week. This is the new student's first experience with 
college life. To help him with the transition from high school to college 
and to help him become acquainted with the campus and with college 
regulations, the college arranges during this period a series of meetings 
and conferences with faculty and with student leaders. 

Orientation activities begun in Freshman Week are continued through- 
out the first semester. A series of all-freshman assemblies cover topics 
of general interest and supplement orientation courses arranged by the 
individual schools. The individual schools provide for regular contact 
with faculty advisers for small-group conferences or individual meetings, 
so that each student will have the opportunity for discussion of matters 
connected with adjustment to college life. 

COUNSEUNG:STUDENTQUESTIONS AND PROBLEMS — — — — — 

General. The general information center for students at State College 
is located in Holladay Hall including the offices of the Dean of student 
Affairs and those of administrators handling attendance, student activi- 
ties, student housing, orientation and counseling, and student financial 
aid. 

Academic. Upon enrolling at State College, each student is assigned 
to a faculty adviser, usually a member of the department in which the 
student is taking his major work. This faculty adviser works with the 
student in planning his program of studies and is available for other help 
in solving problems of an acaflcmic nature. The deans, directors of in- 
struction, and department heads are also available to the student to help 
him get infrirmation about the different curricula and to help him think 
through his e<lucational plans. Teachers of courses in which the student 
is enrolled are the best sources of help with particular subjects. Members 
of the teaching staff maintain a schedule of office hours and expect the 
student to consult them individually wherever special help is needed. 
Coaching classes are held in mathematics, chemistry, and physics, as a 
supplement to regular class instruction. 

Dormitory Counseling. Each of the dormitories at State College has a 
building manager, an upporclassman with the qualification for and re- 
sponsibility of helping individual students in his dormitory, particularly 
freshmen, in any way he can. Floor managers and, in many cases, assis- 

30 



tants chosen on the same basis, assist the dormitory manager. Whenevet 
these manajrers cannot answer particular questions or pive aid in 
solvinjr special problems, they direct the student to the administrative 
official who can. Also, in some of the larger dormitories, faculty 
couples are (juartered, to provide the influence and assistance that such 
mature persons can frive. 

Financial I'lohlrnis. The Student P'inancial Aid Ortice in Holladay Hall 
provides the contact with the North Carolina State Colle^re Scholarship 
and Student Aid Committee, whose functions are discussed in the next 
section. Information about various aid possibilities, applications for 
grants or loans and help in obtaining part-time employment are available 
at the Student Financial Aid Office. 

Vocational Testing and Counseling. Psychological tests and counseling 
are available to any student at the Counseling Center in Holladay Hall. 
Students who are undecided about curriculum choice and ultimate voca- 
tional goals may find it profitable to avail themselves of this service. 

Placement. Each of the degree-granting Schools at State College pro- 
vides its students with assistance in obtaining employment during 
summer vacation and upon graduation. In some curricula a period of 
approved summer work is required for graduation. 

— — — — — — — — — - FINANCIAL AID FOR STUDENTS 



The program of financial aid for State College is administered by the 
Student Financial Aid Officer under the general direction of the North 
Carolina State College Scholarship and Student Aid Committee. This 
committee, with representation from the various Schools and other 
agencies interested in providing such aid. It has the responsibility not 
only of awarding grants and scholarships to deserving students but also 
of considering with the student his entire plan for fiancing his education 
and assisting him to make effective use of available resources. 

Financial aid for students is divided into two classifications: (1) 
general scholarships, grants-in-aid, loans, athletic awards, and self 
help (these are administered generally by the central committee); 
(2) restricted scholarships; fellowships (these are administered by or 
through the Schools or Departments of the college). 

General Scholarships are those which are available to State College 
students without regard to curriculum. 

Grants-in-aid are awards in varying amounts, normally not to exceed 
$200. They are awarded to deserving students from funds derived from 
the State of North Carolina Escheats Fund and from a portion of the 
earnings of the Student Supply Store. 

Loans on a long-term basis are made to deserving students who can 
meet legal requirements for proper notes. Ordinarily the student does not 
make payments on the principal until after leaving the college perma-t 
nently. Short-term emergency loans up to $50 are also available from the 
Student Government Loan Fund. 

Athletic-Grants-in-Aid are made to athletes who are deserving of good 
character. These awards are made from funds provided by the Wolfpack 
Club and the North Carolina State College P]ducationai Trust Fund. 

The Self-Help program provides an eniployment service for students 
who desire part-time work to assist themselves financially. Jobs are avail- 
able both on and off campus. 

Restricted Scholarships are those which are awarded to students in 
particular curricula. These are available in the Schools of Agriculture. 
Design, Education, Engineering, Forestry, and Textiles from funds made 
available by individuals, groups, and industrial and business organiza- 
tions. 

31 



Periodically, the Scholarship and Student Aid Committee publishes 
a full listing of scholarships and awards available both to entering fresh- 
men and upperclassmen. Copies of these listings may be secured from 
the Student Financial Aid Office. 

FELLOWSHIPS ASD GRADUATE ASSISTAXTSHIPS 

Graduate fellowships are funds offered to graduate students to assist 
in the support of programs of advanced study. Holders of fellowships 
have no obligations to the college and may devote full time to the prose- 
cution of their graduate programs. Funds for these fellowships are pro- 
vided by various professional groups and business organizations. 

Graduate Assistantships are granted to selected students who devote 
some part of their time to service duties for the college. Teaching assis- 
tantships carry a stipend of $1200 for the academic year and permit a 
holder to enroll for sixty per cent of a full course load. Stipends for 
research assistantships range from $1500 to $2100 for a 12-months 
appointment. 



32 



. . . the two supreme temporal needs 
ot North Carolina today are (1) a 
race ot farmers so intelligent, so 
thrifty, so capably fitted that it can 
win from the soil a more adequate 
return for its labors and thereby add 
to its comfort and education and 
wealth of the State. . . . 



. . . and (2) a specifically educated 
class of men who can tinn our raw 
products into more hiohly organized 
wares and who can skillfully and im- 
hestitatingly lead the industrial prog- 
ress of our people. 1 ( ontribiue nK)re 
and more ea( h year to the rearing of 
such iiifu is the mission of our (ol- 
lege. 

Daniel Harvey Hill 
President. 190S-1916 



2^ 




34 



William Neal Reynolds Coliseum Entrance 




SEVEN SCHOOLS 



SERVING OVER 5,000 STUDENTS 



III. PROGRAMS OF STUDY 
BY SCHOOLS 



Page 

School of Agriculture 36-69 

Agricultural Experiment Station 69 

Agricultural Extension Work 70 

School of Design 72-76 

School of Education 77-93 

School of Engineering 94-133 

School of Forestry 134-146 

School of General Studies 147-151 

School of Textiles 151-163 

Graduate School 163 

College Extension Division 164 

Military Training 165 

35 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

D. W. COLVARD, DEAN 

R. L. LOVVORN, DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTION 

INTRODUCTORY- __________ 

A^ricailtuie was man's first profession. It is also his most important 
one because, "without food nothing else matters." North Carolina has 
more farmers than any other state in the nation. Only three states 
outrank it in cash value of farm crops produced and only about 20 states 
now outrank it in value of livestock and livestock products. Differences in 
soil, rainfall and altitude within its borders offer a wide variety of choice 
in agricultural production in the state. Graduates of the School of Agri- 
culture have other choices than that of farming for their life's work. 
Many continue their studies in various graduate schools as preparation 
for resident or extension teaching, or for careers in research. Many 
others enter business careers in fields closely allied to agriculture. 

The overall objective of the School of Agriculture is the development 
of well-rounded, educated persons capable of playing important parts 
in the task of providing for the basic needs of mankind — food, clothing, 
shelter. 

For success in the School of Agriculture, a student should be equipped 
with the necessary tools of science, mathematics and language or at 
least show an aptitude for these fields. The student's first two years in 
the School of Agriculture are devoted quite largely to the sciences, mathe- 
matics, English, economics together with some beginning courses in 
agriculture. 

More specifically, the objectives of the School of Agriculture are: 

To obtain through scientific research, experimentation, and demonstra- 
tion accurate and reliable information relating to soils, plants, and ani- 
mals, and to obtain from every available source reliable statistical, tech- 
nical, and scientific data relating to every phase of agriculture that might 
be of advantage to the State; 

To provide instruction in the College for young men who desire to 
enter the field of general agriculture, or to become professionals in agri- 
cultural education or specialists in any field of science related to agri- 
culture; 

To disseminate reliable information through publications and through 
extension agents, and by the wise use of this information to give instruc- 
tion to agricultural workers on the scientific, experimental, and practical 
progress in varous lines of agriculture. 

Agriculture has always been an art but today's agriculture is firmly 
based on science; thereby requiring that students become thoroughly 
grounded in science, both physical and biological. Nevertheless, breadth 
of training and understanding should not be sacrificed to narrow special- 
ization in any field. Studies in language, history, philosophy^the hu- 
manities and social sciences in general — are therefore assigned as prom- 
inent a place as possible in all agricultural curricula at North Carolina 
State College. 

CURRICULAR OFFERINGS AND REQUIREMENTS— — — _ — — — 

A freshman student in the School of Agriculture will have an ultimate 
choice from among 25 curricula. As a freshman he may enroll in the 
General Agriculture curriculum or in one of 5 specialized curricula. 
If he enrolls in General Agriculture he will major in his upper-class 
years in one of a total of 19 optional curricula offered in the following 
departments which function as major fields of special interest. Some of 

36 



AGRrCULTURE 



the particular phases of the work in each departnient are indicated 
herewith: 

A);ricultural EconomicK — Farm Marketing and Farm Man- 
agement 
Animal Industry — Animal or Dairy Husbandry or Nutrition 
Hotany — Hacteriolojcy, Plant I'hysiolony 
Kntomolojjy — Toxicolo^jy, Insect Control 
Experimental Statistics — Planning;, Interpretation 
Field Crops — Production, IMant Hreedinj; 
Genetics — Hereditary Transmission. Cytolojjy 
Horticulture — Fruit, Ornamental or Vegetable Crops and 

Processing 
Plant Pathology — Disease Identification and Control 
Poultry Science — Hreedinj;, Manan^nient, Marketing 
Rural Sociology— Human Relations, (iroup Behavior 
Soils — Genesis and Classification. Chemistry, Physics, Miro- 

bioloKy, Conservation and Management 
Zoolojjy — Animal Ecology and Physiology, Wildlife Conser- 
vation and Management 

A freshman student on the other hand may choose to go into any one 
of five specialized curricula immediately. These are as follows: 

Agricultural Engineering — Farm Structures, Soil and Water 

Conservation F^ngineering, Rural F}lectrificati(m, and 

Farm Machinery 
Mechanized Agriculture — Farm Structures, Soil and Water 

Conservation, and Farm Machinery 
Chemistry — Agricultural and Hiological 
Dairy Manufacturing — Market Milk, Hutter, Cheene. Ice 

('ream 
Wildlife Conservation and Management 

A Pre-Veterinary curriculum is available to students as part of a work- 
ing agreement with two Southern Veterinary Colleges. After the com- 
pletion of the prescribed work (usually li years) 8 North Carolina 
students are selected each year to attend the University of Georgia 
Veterinary College and 4 to attend the Veterinary College at Oklahoma 
A & M College at in-state rather than out of state tuition rates. The first 
year's work (up to 42 credits) at either Georgia or Oklahoma may be 
transferred to North Carolina State College and counted toward 
graduation requirements for a U.S. degree from N. C. State in the 
General Agriculture curriculum with a major in Zoology, Animal In- 
dustry or Poultry Science. 

In the case of all students in the School of Agriculture, required or 
elective courses must be taken from at least 6 departments (other than 
Uiajor department) in the Schools of Agriculture and Forestry — exclusive 
of 1 credit courses. Exceptions may be made with the approval of the 
Director of Instruction. (See also Experimental Statistics page 52.) 

Students excused from required Military or Air Science and/or Physical 
Education must earn equivalent credits in the Humanities and/or Social 
Sciences. 

The Departments listed above as offering major field work in General 
Agriculture in upper-class years and those offering specialized curricula 
throughout 4 years are discussed in the following pages. Mechanized 
Agriculture will be found under the Department of .Agricultural Engi- 
neering; Dairy Manufacturing under the Department of Animal Industry; 
and Wildlife, Zoology and Pre-Veterinary under the Department of 
Zoology. 

37 



AGRICULTURE 



DEGREES- — — — — — — — — — — — — — _ — 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon the satisfactory 
completion of one of the curricula in this School, 

The defcree of Master of Science is offered in the various departments 
in the School of Agi'iculture upon the satisfactory completion of the 
stipulated requirements. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered by the following depart- 
ments: Agricultural Economics, Animal Industry, Dairy Manufacturing, 
Botany, Entomology, Experimental Statistics, Field Crops, Genetics, 
Plunt Pathology, Soils and Zoology. 

Further information may be found in the Graduate School Catalog. 
OPPORTUNITIES— — — — _ — __ — _ — — _ — 

Classification of career opportunities in agriculture could be made in 
a variety of patterns. The Association of Land Grant Colleges recog- 
nizes 8 categories as shown in the accompanying tabulation. The broad 
field of agriculture presently needs 15,000 agricultural graduates per year 
but is now getting only 8,500. Opportunity is written large before any 
agricultural college graduate, although a young person should never lose 
sight of the fact that the most important thing in the world is to find work 
that one really loves. In Agriculture there are 8 general fields of oppor- 
tunity; 

Farming — Crops, Livestock, Fruts, Vegetables, Specialties, etc. 

Research — Production, Marketing, Processing, etc. 

Industry — Meat, Dairy, Poultry, Feed, Fertilizer, etc. 

Business — Grading, Marketing, Credit, Cooperatives, etc. 

Education — College, Secondary, Extension Teaching, etc. 

Communications — Writing, Reporting, Radio, Television, etc. 

Conservation — Soil, Water, Range, Forest, Wildlife, etc. 

Services — Inspection, Regulation, Plant & Animal Quarantine, ect. 

Probably no field offers more diverse career opportunities than the 
field of agriculture. From the cloistered life of the researcher in his frock 
coat to the business dress of thousands of people supplying the needs 
of farmers or processing and marketing the manifold articles originatingf 
in agriculture's fields, ranches, or barns and on to the blue jeans of the 
actual producers, there is opportunity to challenge the best in modern 
Ameiican youth. If your inteiest lies anywhere in this broad field. The 
School of Agriculture at North Caioliiia State College will welcome you. 
The lai-ge faculty (150 well-trained persons) and diverse programs of 
study are dedicated to the development of creative agricultural specialists 
who are also "competent in mind; vigoi-ous in body; tolerant in attitude; 
courageous in spirit; and cooperative in temperment." 

COMPOSITE FRESHMAN CURRICULUM 

ALL CURRICULA IN SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

1. Geneial Agriculture & Pre-Veterinary 

2. Agricultural Engineei-ing 

3. Mechanized Agriculture 

4. Dairy Manufacturing 

5. Wildlife Conservation & Management 

6. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 

FALL SEMESTER 
Taken by Course Credits 

1,2..3, 1.5,6 ENG 111 3 

(Composition) 
2.3,6 MA 101 5 

CF'irst Year Mathematics for Engineers) 
1,1,5 MA 111 4 

(Algebra & Trigonometry) 

38 



1.2,3.4,5 


|{() toi 




((ienoral Holany) 


1,1.5 


ZO 101 




((JcntTal ZooloK.v) 


1,2.3,1,5. 


A(; 101 




Agriculture and World Affairs 


6 


CM 201 




((Jcneral Inorpanic) 


2.3 


AGK 151 




(Farm Mechanics) 


2.3 


MK 101 




(KnKineerinK Graphics I) 


5 


HI 261 




(The Inited States in Western Civilization) 


1.2.3.1,5,6 


MS 101 




or 




AS 121 


1,2,3,4,5,6 


I'E 101 



AGRICULTURE 

3 
3 
3 
5 
4 
2 
3 
2 
2 



SPRING SEMESTER 



Taken by Course Credits 

1.2,3,4.5,6 ENG 112 3 

(Composition) 
2,3,6 MA 102 * 

(First Year Mathematics for Engineers) 

1.4 MA 112 * 
(Analytic Geometry & Calculus) 

1.5 HO 102 3 
(General Botany) 

1,5 ZO 102 3 

(General Zoology) 
1,2,3,1 CH 101 4 

(General Inorganic Chemistry) 
6 CH 205 5 

((Jeneral (Qualitative Chemistry) 
4 AI 201 4 

(l'',U'mcnts of Dairy Science) 
2,3 ME 102 2 

(Engineering Graphics II) 3 

4 PSY 200 3 
(Introduction to Psychology) 

5 PS 201 3 
(The American (Jovernnu-ntal System) 

1,2.3,4,5,6 MS 102 2 
or 

AS 122 2 

1,2,-3,4,5,6 PE 102 1 

( urrirulum 1 other than F'rc-\ ct. may >.uh>titutr an Kl«-tti\p for ( hemistr> ini in 

HprinK ■^en1e^tor. 
Curricula 2 and ^ lakr Hotnn> inl in Sprinc Scmpstrr. 
Curriculum ."i take^ MA 1 I I in Soring Soniotor. 

Curriculum fi tikes either Holany ini and Ui2 or /oolony 101 «. 102. 
An Optional Mathematics course mav he suhstifuted for MA 112 in some curricula at the 

request of the student and the discretion of his advisor and the Director of Instruction. 
If Chemistry i» taken the second semester of the freshman year. 7,(» in2. (Jeneral ZooloKy, 

or BO 102. General Botany, may he taken in the sophomore year. 

39 



AGRICULTURE 



UPPER-CLASS CURRICULUM IN GENERAL AGRICULTURE 



CH 101 

CH 103 
CH 203 
EC 201 
AGC 212 
PY 211 
HI 261 



MS 201, 202 
AS 221, 222 
PE 201, 202 



General Inorganic Chemistry 4 

(If not taken in Freshman Year) 

General and Qualitative Chemistry or 

General and Organic Chemistry 4 or 

Economics and 

Economics of Agriculture 3 

General Physics and 

The United States in Western 

Civilization 4 or 3 

Major Field Ellectives or 

Agricultural Electives 6 

Military Science or 

Air Science 2 

Phvsical Education 1 



Credits 




4orO 



4 or 3 



6 or 9 



19 or 20 19 or 20 



SOI 200 Soils 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

English Elective 



PS 201 The American Governmental System 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

Humanities or Social Science 
Major Field Electives or 
Agricultural Electives 
Advanced Military Science or 
Advanced Air Science or 
Advised Electives 



3 
3 
6 

35 



12 
69 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS- 



Frofcssor H. B. James, Head of the Depurtnieiit 

Professor Emeritus G. W. Forster 

Professor Charles E. Bishop, W. W. McPherson, Richard A. King 

Associate Professors Aithur J. Coutu, Henry A. Homme, Quentin W. 

Lindsay, Lee R. Martin, W. H. Pierce,' George S. Tolley, W. D. 

Toussaint, J. C. Williams, Jr. 
Assistant Professors James A. Seagraves, Anthony P. Stemberger 



OBJECTIVES 



Students in Agricultural Economics are trained to deal with practical 
problems of managing a farm and marketing farm products. The major 
objective of this training is to provide a foundation in basic economic 
principles and techniques of analyses which will be useful in making 
sound decisions with respect to what and how to produce, how and when 
to buy or sell, and how to evaluate new developments in technology, 
changes in agricultural policies or other factors which affect their pro- 
duction and marketing plans. 



40 



AGRICULTURE 
— CURRICULA 



UNDERGRADUATE 

The curriculum is (Icsijriu'cl to provide a broad training;; for students who 
are interested in the economic problems of a^iifulture. Emphasis is 
placed upon the factors determininjj prices and the use of prices in 
makin^r decisions. Technical problems are used as a basis for learninK 
how to make economic evaluations of the income effects of change. The 
effect of }?overnment policies and prof^rams upon ajjriculture are con- 
sidered. 

The flexibility of the curriculum and the wide ranne of courses dealt 
with enable the Department to train students for many types of jobs 
where a knowledge of technical agriculture and the economic principles 
applicable to a^'riculture are useful. Students have a choice of subjects 
in Farm Management, Marketing. Policy, and other phases of farm 
economics, as well as in the principles of agricultural economics around 
which the applied courses are built. The decree of Bachelor of Science 
in Agricultural Economics may be earned under the provisions of the 
General Curriculum in Agriculture. In addition to the requirements of 
the General Curriculum in Agriculture, see pages .'58 and 40, the follow- 
ing courses are required for students majoring in Agricultural Economics: 

Credits 
AGC 303 Farm Management I 3 

AGC 533 Agricultural I'olicy 3 

AGC 551. 552 Agricultural Economic Theory 6 

EC 401 Principles of Accounting 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Elective Course in Marketing S_ 

21 

This permits the student to elect at least 32 semester hours in other 
fields and provides him with an opportunity to obtain a better under- 
standing of the technical and social forces affecting economic decisions. 

GRADUATE 

The Department of Agricultural Economics also offers a wide range of 
opportunities for advanced instruction and research leading to the degree 
of Master of Agricultural Economics (professional degree), Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Agricultural Economics. The grad- 
uate program is designed to iirovide a thorough foundation in economic 
theory, with emphasis upon the ajiplication of economic principles in the 
solution of agricultural problems. North Carolina i)rovides a laboratory 
unsurpassed by any other area in its opportunities for the study of prob- 
lems associated with the economic development of agriculture, especially 
in relation to current industrial development. In addition to the courses in 
basic economic theory, special training is offered in economics of con- 
sumption and distribution of agricultural products, economics of produc- 
tion, land economics, analysis of agricultural policies and programs, 
monetary and fiscal policies in relation to agriculture, international trade, 
econometrics, and analysis of economic development in agriculture. 

_________ ______ FACILITIES 

The Department is well equipped with modern equipment essential to 
its extensive research and teaching program. It has a modern depart- 
mental library, including an excellent set of references to the major 
professional Journals in the field of Agricultural Economics and Experi- 
ment Station publications from other institutions. A great volume of 
farm information is available for study and for illustrating the principles 
of modern farm management. Statistical information on consumption, 
marketing, agricultural finance, taxation, insurance, soil conservation 

41 



AGRICULTURE 



practices, and atrricultuial ptjlicy also is available for use of students and 

ayiicultural woi'kers. 

OPPORTUNITIES— — _— ______ ____ 

The rapid jrrovvth and development of industry and afrriculture in 
North Carolina and throujj:hout the South has resulted in an increased 
demand for workers who are well trained in both the fundamentals of 
technical ajjriculture and economic analysis. Many jrraduates of the De- 
partment of Ajii'icultural Economics are employed in research and edu- 
cational work by the various acencies of the Federal and State jrovern- 
nients. These include the Agricultural Extension Service, the Aprricul- 
tural Experiment Station, the State Department of Ajrriculture, and 
various divisions of the United States Department of Agi'iculture. Others 
iire enKajjed in professional farm management, professional work with 
banks and other commercial organizations dealing in agricultural credit, 
farm supplies and equipment, and the production, processing, and mar- 
keting of agricultural products. Graduates of Agricultural Economics 
are especially well-qualified to manage, or to assist in managing, any 
business enterprise related to agriculture. Since the number of requests 
received by the Department for employees exceeds the number of stu- 
dents graduating, students generally have a choice of positions. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING — — _ — _ — _ 



Frofessor G. Wallace Giles, Head of the Department 

Professors F. J. Hassler, David S. Weaver, John W. W^eaver, Jr. 

Associate Professors H. D. Bowen, J. M. Fore, W. E. Splinter, T. Virgil 

Wilson 
Assistant Professors George B. Blum, Jr., Ezra L. Howell, Blaine F. 

Parker, Jan van Schilfgaarde 
Head Mechanic Ralph B. Greene 

OBJECTIVES— _ — __ ______ ____ 

Students in Agricultural Engineering are educated and trained to deal 
with the problems of agriculture that are engineering in nature. Involved 
are the application of scientific and engineering principles to the conser- 
vation and utilization of water and soil, the development of power and 
labor-saving devices for all phases of agiicultural production, the design 
ol" structures and equipment for housing and handling livestock and field 
products, and the processing and marketing of farm products. 

The need for men to carry out the technical aspects such as develop- 
ment and research as well as less technical work such as sales an<l service 
of farm equipment requires the offering of two distinct curricula as 
described below. A common first year is provided in order to allow 
the student more time to select one of the two curricula. 

curricula _ ____ ______ ____ 

a(;ri('ultural engineering curriculum 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Agricultural Engineering 

This curriculum is designed to develop young men capable of engineer- 
ing leadership in agri<uiture. P^npiiasis is i)laced on basic science courses 
such as mathematics, physics, mechanics, biology, soils, and thermody- 
namics, which provide a sound background for engineering and agricul- 
tural technologies. Courses in Agricultural P^ngineering are designed to 
teach the student to make application of sciences to agriculture. General 
Agriculture courses are provided so that the student can better under- 
stand the agricultural industry with which he deals. 

Since Agricultural Engineering involves two distinct technical fields — 
Agriculture and Engineering — this curriculum is a joint responsibility of 
the two schools and is so admiinstered. 

42 



AGRICULTURE 



MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE CURRICULUM 

Li'iuliiiK to tlu" (leRrt'e of Bailu-lor of Mcjhainzed Agriculture 

This lurrifulum is less tcrhnical tliaii tho Aj,nicultural EnKineeriiiK 
Curriculum. It is designed for those who aic woikiiiR on a practical level 
with farm people. (Jraduates are equipped to apply to tlie farm the new 
technologies as developed and reveale<l by the technical engineer. The 
courses are presented mainly from the viewpoint of the user and 

consunier^ p^ciLITIES 

The offices, classrooms, and shops used in A^vicultural EnKineerinK 
are located in Manuum and Tompkins halls. One half of a new Agricul- 
tural Enjrineerinti- building-, to provide more adequate facilities, will be 
readv for occupancy around September, 1956. 

At present, the facilities include six laboratories and .shops, plus field 
laboratory areas. The farm machinery laboratory has the latest labor- 
savinjr faVm equipment for preparing seedbeds, plantinjr, cultivating and 
harvestinj; crops. These machines are furnished by leading' farm ma- 
chinery manufacturers and are replaced from time to time as improve- 
ments are developed. Special effort is made to have on hand all types of 
equipment for use in the best practices in the production of farm crops. 
The farm engines and tractors laboratory is equipped with various makes 
and styles of tractors and supplementary farm power units, and with the 
tools and equipment most commonly used by service shops. Other equip- 
ment consists of drawbar and belt dynamometers for testing. The farm 
shop located in Tompkins Hill, considered one of the finest teaching .shops 
of its kind anywhere, is completely equipped with the latest po\yer and 
hand tools, a' research shop operated for the Experiment Station and 
available for use by senior students doing research work in the course 
"Special Problems" is considered the best equipped shop of its kind in the 
nation. The farm buildings laboratory is equipped with drawing tables, 
a blueprint machine, supply cabinets, and models of various types of farm 
buildings construction. The rural ele -trification laboratory is equipped 
with the latest types of electrical appliances and devices as used by 
farmers on rural lines, much of it loaned by manufacturers. Laboratory 
equipment for land improvement consists of sets of surveyinu- instru- 
ments, drafting tables, calculating ei'iipment. and field machines for 
this tvne of work. 

Field laboratory areas in crops, vineyaids, orchards, and pastures are 
available for demonstrations and practice in tht- use of farm equipment 
and m drainage ami erosion control. ^ OPPORTUNITIES 

Men trained in Agricultural Engineering are qualified for positions in 
design, development, and research in public institutions and in industry 
and for teaching and extension work in institutions of higher education. 
The curriculum also provides adequate training for postgraduate work 
leading to advanced degrees. ,.c i r 

Men trained in the field of Mechanized Agriculture are qualified for 
positions in sales and service of agricultural equipment such as farm 
machinery, irrigation systems, etc.; as county agents or farmers; and 
for farm advisory work with such organizations as electric power 
companies. 

SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

\ mininuiiii of iri.", smicstci- hour-^ i< rccpiired for graduation. 
1 " See page :\H <''-''<'*'^ 



«OI 200 Soib 



I 



f"H io.'i General and Oru'nic Chemistry I 

CE 201 Survevinu' I J ? 

English Elective J " 

MA 201. 202 Calriihis I. II 14 

43 



AGRICULTURE 



PY 201, 202 General I'hysics 

MS 201, 202 Military Science* or 

AS 221. 222 Air Science* 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education* 



2 
1 

19 



2 
1 

19 



AGE 211 
AGE 371 
EC 201 
EE 320 
EM 311, 312 
EM 321 
EM 430 
ENG 321 
ME 301 



AGC 212 
AGE 451 
AGE 452 
AGE 462 
AGE 481 
AGE 491 
AGE 551 
HI 261 
PS 201 
RS 301 



Farm Power and Machinery 

Soil and Water Conservation Engineering 

Economics 

Elements of Electrical EnKineerinp 

Mechanics I, II 

Strength of Materials I 

Fluid Mechanics 

Basic Speaking Skills 

Engineering Thermodynamics I 

Military Science or 

Air Science or 

Electives 



Economics of Agriculture 

Farm Structures 

Curing and Drying of Farm Crops 

Senior Seminar 

Farm Power and Machinery IIA 

Rural Electrification 

Special Problems 

The United States in Western Civilization 

The American Governmental Systerm 

Sociology of Rural Life 

Social Science Elective 

Military Science or 

Air Science or 

Electives 



3 





4 








3 


4 





3 


3 





3 





2 





3 





3 


3 


3 


7 


20 





3 





4 


2 





1 


1 


4 





4 








** 





3 


3 





3 








3 


3 


3 


10 


19 



SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE 



A minimum of 151 semester hours required for graduation 
For Freshman Year, see page 38 (same as Agricultural Engineering). 



AGE 211 Farm Power and Machinery I 

CH 203 General and Organic Chemistry 

CE 201 Surveying I 

EC 201 Economics 

English Elective 

MA 201 Calculus I 

PY 211. 212 General Physics 

PO 201 Chicken and Turkey Production 

MS 201, 202 Military Science* or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science* 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education* 



Credits 






3 


4 








3 





3 


3 





4 





4 


4 





4 


2 


2 


1 


1 



18 



20 



44 



AGRICULTURE 



AG(" 212 Kconomics of Agriculture 

A(J(" 303 Farm .Mananemcnl I 

AGE 321 Irriy:a(ion, Drainajie, and lerracing 

AGE 111 Farm Power and ."Machinery IIH 

SOI 200 Soils 

AI 200 l^lements of Dairy Science or 

AI 202 Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 

EC 107 Business La>s 

EM 341 Mechanics A 

FOR 311 Principles of F'arm Forestry 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psyeholoyy 

Military Science or 

Air Science or 

Elect ives 



3 








3 


4 








3 


4 








4 





3 


2 





2 








3 



18 19 



A AGE 332 Farm Huildinjjs and Crop Processing 

AGE 341 Farm Electrification and I'tilities 

AGE 452 Senior Seminar 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

Field Crops Elective 
HI 261 The I'nited Stales in Western Civilization 

Horticulture Elective 

Market injr Elective 
PS 201 The American (Jovernmental System 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

Military Science or 

Air Science or 

Elect ives 3 3 

18 19 

* Students excused from Military or Air Science and/or Physical 
Education will schedule equivalent credits in courses outside their 
department. 
** Credits by arrantrement. 



4 





4 





1 


1 


3 





3 








3 





3 





3 





3 





3 



ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



Professor J. W. Pou, Head of the Department 

Professors E. R. Barrick, C. D. Grinnells. F. M. Haijj, J. E. Legates, 

G. Matrone. J. C. Osborne, \V. M. Roberts, M. L. Speck. H. A. 

Stewart. R. K. Waugh, G. H. Wi.se 
Asi^ochitc Profrsfforii L. W. Aurand, T. N. Blunier, W. R. Murlev. F. H. 

Smith. W. E. Thomas, S. B. Tove, F. G. Warren 
Asxisfatif Profissars ,J. P. Ammeinian, R. R. Bell, A. J. Clawson. E. U. 

Dillard, Lemuel (Joode, J. G. Lecce. J. L. Moore. H. A. Ramsev. R. B. 

Redfern. W. W. G. Smart. Jr.. J. .1. McNeill 
IiistrKctors L. F. Blanton, B. R. Farthing. J. H. (Jregory. R. D. Mochrie, 

R. M. Myers 

— — — — — — — — _ _ ____ OBJECTIVES 

The Department of .Animal Industry has the responsibility for trainiiiK 
students in the fields of dairy and livestock production and processing. 
To accomplish this aim. the Department offers two curricula — one in 

45 



AGRICULTURE 

Animal Industry, with the opportunity for specialization in Dairy Hus- 
bandry, and the other in Dairy Manufacturing, 

Students who have not had the opportunity to gain farm experience 
before entering college may adapt themselves more readily to work in 
dairy manufacturing. Those who plan to pursue production work should 
gain all of the farm experience possible prior to graduation. Members 
of the Animal Industry Department staff will be glad to assist in plan- 
ning a summer work experience. 

FACILITIES — — — — _ ______ ____ 

The Department of Animal Industry, with the exception of the Veteri- 
nary Section, is housed in Polk Hall, a three-story building located near 
the center of the campus. One wing of the basement of this building is 
devoted to the dairy manufacturing plant and laboratories. These facili- 
ties are equipped with the most modern machinery available for teaching 
and research in the processing and distribution of market milk, ice cream, 
cheese, butter, and other dairy products. 

The farm meats laboratories are located in the other basement wing. 
These laboratories provide facilities for animal slaughtering and meat 
processing and preservation. They are well-equipped for teaching and 
research and are among the most modei'n and up-to-date in the country. 

The three upper floors of Polk Hall contain offices, classrooms, a 
library, and laboratories in dairy bacteriology, dairy chemistry, animal 
nutrition, animal physiology, animal breeding, and meats. The teaching, 
research, and extension staff members in the various areas of animal 
production and dairy manufacturing have their offices in the building. 

The Veterinary Section is located in a new and modern Animal Disease 
Laboratory Building. This Building has excellent facilities for reseai-ch 
and teaching in the animal disease field, including large animal isolation 
units for work in the field of virology, and a diagnostic laboratory. 

The Department maintains three livestock farms, which are located 
within a few miles of the campus. The Animal Husbandry Farm contains 
1,100 acres. Registered and commercial herds of beef cattle, swine, and 
sheep are maintained for teaching and research. The adjoining Dairy 
Farm contains 900 acres. Two well-equipped and modern dairy barns 
house over 200 head of registered Ayrshire, Guernsey, Holstein, and 
Jersey cattle. A judging pavilion and an artificial breeding bull barn, with 
completely equipped laboratories, are also located on this farm. A re- 
search center, containing an animal nutrition laboratory and barns and 
other facilities to accommodate large animals for experimental purposes, 
is located on the third farm. 

OPPORTUNITIES— ___ ______ ____ 

There are many opportunities for students who major in Animal In- 
dustry to enter either the production or processing fields. Students who 
specialize in Animal or Dairy Husbandry are well qualified for a cai'eer 
in agricultural extension or similar educational work; in the commercial 
field with the feed industry, breed associations, dairy and livestock equip- 
ment companies, and similar concerns; or in the operation and manage- 
ment of dairy and livestock herds and farms. 

Good opportunities are always available in the dairy manufacturing 
industry for young men with energy and a sound training in dairy 
manufactuiing. There are also many opportunities for graduate study in 
the various dairv and animal sciences. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



Students have the opportunity to train for judging teams in meats, 
livestock, dairy cattle, and dairy pioducts. Each year these four teams 

46 



AGRICULTURE 

represent the College in the respective national intercollejriate judging 
contests. The opportunities for excellent supplemental training and 
valuable trips and experiences are provided students who participate in 
these judging team programs. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — __ —CURRICULA 

Students in the Department may specialize in Animal Husbandry, 
Dairy Husbandry or Dairy Manufacturing. Majors in Animal Husbandry 
and Dairy Husbandry should elect the general cuiiiculum in Agriculture 
the first two years (see pages :{8 and 40) and will follow the option of 
their choice as shown below during their Junior and Senior years. 

Students majoring in Dairy Manufacturing will follow the specialized 
curriculum in Dairy Manufacturing on Page 48. 

— — — — — — — — — — ANIMAL HUSBANDRY OPTION 



See Page 38 



See Page 40 



Credit.' 



ZO 301 Animal Physiology 

AI 312 I'rinciples of Livestock Nutrition 

BO 412 General Bacteriology 

AI 301 Grading and Selection Meat Animals 

SOI 200 Soils 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

AI 303 Meat and Meat Products 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

PS 201 American Governmental Svstem 

RS 301 Socilology of Rural Life 

.Militarv Science or Elective 



AI 401, 402, orBeef. Pork and Sheep Production 

403 (Two of above required) 

AI 406 Seminar 

AI 503 Animal Breeding 

AI 505 Diseases of Farm Animals 

Agricultural Klectives 

English Elective 

Social Science or Humanities Elective 

Military Science or Elective 

Free Elective 



3 








3 





4 





2 


4 





3 





3 





3 








3 


3 





3 


3 


19 


18 


3 


3 





1 


3 





3 








H 


3 





3 


3 


3 


3 





3 



18 



19 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY OPTION 



See Page 38 



See Page 40 



Credit.s 



ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

BO 412 General Bacteriology 

SOI 200 Soils 

AI 305 .ludging — Selection of Dairy Cattle 



3 








4 


4 





2 






47 



AGRICULTURE 



ZO 301 Animal Physiology 

AI 312 Principles of Livestock Nutrition 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 

En>i;lish Elective 

Humanities Elective 

Agricultural Elective 

Air Science or 

Advanced Military or 

Advised Electives 



RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

AI 503 Animal Breeding 

AI 505 Diseases of F^arm Animals 

DM 401 Market Milk and Related Products 

AI 404 Dairy Farm Problems 

PS 201 The American Governmental System 

AI 502 Reproduction and Lactation 

AI 40fi Animal Industry Seminar 

Humanities Elective 

Agricultural Electives 

Advanced Military or 

Air Science or 

Advised Electives 



3 








3 





3 





3 


3 








3 



18 19 



3 





3 





3 








3 





3 





3 





4 





1 


3 





3 






17 



Students should schedule Elements df Dairy Science and Fundamentals 
of Animal Husbandry prior to their Junior year. 



SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 
. A minimum of 146 credits required for graduation. 



Credits 



AG 101 Agriculture and World Affairs 

AI 201 Introduction to Dairy Science 

BO 101 General Botany 

CH 101 General Inorganic Chemistry 

ENG 111,112 Composition 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A* 

ZO 101 Introduction to Psychology 

PSY 200 General Zoology 

MS 101, 102 Militarv Science - or 

AS 121. 122 Air Science 

PE 101, 102 Phvsical Education** 



3 








4 


3 








4 


3 


3 


4 








4 





3 


3 





2 


2 


1 


1 



19 21 



«fO 112 General Bacteriology 4 

CH 103 (Jeneral and Qualitative Chemistry or 

CH 203 General and Organic Chemistry 4 

DM 401 Market Milk and Related Products 3 



48 



AGRICULTURE 



EC 201 Kconomirs and 

Kcononiic l\loctive 

Knjjlish Klectives 
HI 261 The I nited States in Western ( ivilization 

PY 211 (;eneral Physics 

I'olitical Science Elective 
MS 201. 202 Military Science or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science 
PK 201. 202 Physical Education 



3 


3 


3 


3 





;i 


4 





3 





2 


2 


1 


1 



20 19 



3 



4 



Maj»»r Field and 

A>rricultural Electives Maximum 50 

Advanced Military Science or 

Advanced Air Science or 

Approved Electives 12 

Electives*** 6-25 



* other mathematics may be substituted for Ma 112. Analytic (ieometry & Calculus A, 
on recommenjJation of adviser. 
•* Students excused from Military or Air Science and/or Physical Education will sched- 
ule equivalent credits in Humanities. 
•*• Must include not less than 6 credits of Social Sciences or Humanities. To be chosen 
with approval of adviser. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — -BOTANY 

Professor H. T. Scofield, Head of Dcpartmcut 

Professor D. B. Anderson 

Associate Professors ERNEST Ball, .•\. F. BoRf;, H. J. Evans, L. A. Whit- 
ford 

Assistant Professors E. O. Beal, P. F. BOURDEAU, W. A. Brun, R. L. 
Wilbur 

___ _ ___________ OBJECTIVES 

Botany emphasizes those phases of plant science which are founda- 
tional for the study of agricultural and forest crop production. Under- 
graduate students who anticipate doing: graduate work may choose to 
major in Botany. Graduate work may be undertaken in several of the 
specialized fields of Botanv. 

______ ______ ___ FACILITIES 

Botanical teaching laboratories are equipped with all the essential fa- 
cilities for the courses offered. Good herbari support the work syste- 
matic botany and dendrology. Laboratories for advanced study and re- 
search in specialized fields are equipped with modern instruments and 
other essential physical facilities. Recently constructed greenhouses pro- 
vide space for teaching and research purposes. 

_________ _ _ —CHEMISTRY 

/'/•o/r.sso/ W. J. Peterson, Head of the De/nntment 

Professor W. A. Reid. In Charge of Chemistri/ Teaching 

Professors G. H. Satterfield, F. W. SiierwooD, P. P. SUTToN. .1. A. 

Weybrew 
Associate Professors T. (J. BovVERV. R. R. Hentz, C. W'. JENNINGS, W. K. 

JORDON, R. H. LOEPPERT. C. C. RoBINSON. M. F. Showalter, F. II. 

Smith, R. C. White 
Assistant Professors T. J. BlalocK. W. P. INGRAM. R. I.. RiNCLER, R. O. 

Simmons, S. B. Tove 
Insfrnctors .J. L. Hall, .Ir.. J. W. MoRGAN. G.M. Oliver. David Willis 

49 



AGRICULTURE 



OBJECTIVES 



Students in Ajifiicultural and Biological Chemistry are trained for 
work in Experiment Stations; in laboratories maintained in connection 
with programs for the inspection and control of foods, pharmaceutical 
products, animal feeds, fertilizers, gasoline and other materials; and for 
technical and business positions in the processing, manufacture, sale, 
distribution, and use of wide range of agricultural and industrial prod- 
ucts. In addition, they i-eceive excellent preparation for graduate study 
leading to research and teaching positions. 

CURRICULUM ____ ______ ____ 

The curriculum in Agricultural and Biological Chemistry is designed 
to give the students fundamental training in mathematics and the biolog- 
ical and physical sciences with a maximum of chemistry. 

It meets the requirements of the American Chemical Society for the 
training of professional chemists. 



SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL 
CHEMISTRY 

14G Credits required for graduation 

1 BO 101, 102 Credits 
CH 201, 205 General Botany or 

ENG 111, 112 General Zoology 3 3 
MA 101, 102 General Inorganic Chemistry; 

MS 101, 102 orGeneral and Qualitative Chemistry 5 5 

AS 121, 122* Composition 3 3 

PE 101, 102 First Year Mathematics for Engineers 5 4 
Militarv Science or 

Air Science 2 2 

Physical Education* 1 1 

19 18 

O CH 211. 212 Quantitative Analysis 4 4 

■^ MA 201. 202 Calculus I. II 4 4 

PY 201, 202 General Physics 5 5 

ZO 101. 102 General Zoology or 

BO 101. 102 General Botany 3 3 

MS 201, 202 orMilitary Science or 

AS 221. 222- Air Science 2 2 

PE 201. 202 Physical Education* 1 1 

19 19 

3 CH 421, 422 Organic Chemistry 5 5 

HI 261 The Inited States in Western Civilization .3 
ML 103. 104 Elementary German; German Grammar 

and Prose Reading 3 3 

PS 201 The .Vmerican Govermental System 3 

Advanced Military or Air Science" 3 3 

Electives** 4 3 

18 17 
50 



AGRICULTURE 



CH 531. r>32 Physical Chemistry 

CH S.ilL, r)32LI*hysical Chemislry Laboratory 

Chemistry Klectives 

Knplish Klectives "^^ 

Advanced Military or Air Science* 

Klectives 



3 


3 


1 


1 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 



♦ Students excused from Military or Air Science and/or Physicnl Education will 
schedule equivalent credits in courses from the following departments: Kconomics. 
EnRlish. History and Political Science, Modern l.anKuaKes. Philosophy and Religion. 
Rural SocioloRv, Social Studies, and Sociolojty. 

•• Electives must include a minimum of 3 credits in Social Sciences, .1 credits in General 
Economics and 9 credits in Aericulture. 

•♦•Students certified as proficient in English may substitute courses in Modern l.an- 
Kuages. A minimum of six credits in (Jerman is required for graduation, it is recom- 
mended that twelve credits in (;erman he taken by students contemplating graduate 
study. 



ENTOMOLOGY 



Professor Clyde F. Smith. Head of the Department 

Professor Emeritus B. B, Fulton 

Professors T. B. Mitchell, W. M. Kalash 

Associate Professor C. H. Brett 

Assistatit Professors J, R. Dogger, R. T. Ga.st. R. L. Rabl), W. A. Stephen, 

\V. I. Mistric. Jr. 



________ ______ —OBJECTIVES 

The EntomoloKy faculty offers instruction at both undergraduate and 
graduate levels and provides students desiring to major in Entomology 
the broad and fundamental training necessary in this profession. Under- 
graduate instruction is also designed to provide introductory and terminal 
courses in insect control technology for students majoring in agronomy, 
animal industiv, horticulture, vocational education, and forestry. Gradu- 
ate courses are available for students wishing to complete requirements 
for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philo.sophy degrees in Entomology, 
as well as for students majoring in any of the plant or animal sciences. 

Since Entomology is of importance in every i)hasi' of agriculture, it is 
necessary for students majoring in entomology to have a broad and 
fundamental training. 



FACILITIES 



Facilities include air-conditioned laboratories and greenhouse space. 
fields for experimental work, general and specialized insect collections, 
and equipment essential to advanced research work. 



51 



AGRICULTURE 

CURRICULUM IN ENTOMOLOGY ______ ____ 

1 See page 38, 

O AGC 212 Economics of Ajrriculture 3 

C'H 101 General Inorganic Chemistry 4 

CH 103 General and (Qualitative Chemistry or 

CH 203 General and Organic Chemistry 4 

EC 201 Economics 3 

English Elective 3 

ENT 312 Economic Entomology 3 

HI 261 The United States in Western Civilization 3 

I'Y 211 General I'hysics 4 

Agricultural Electives* 3 

MS 201, 202 Military Science or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science 4 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 2 

O SOI 200 Soils 4 

•^ ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 3 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 3 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Agricultural Electives* 9 

Entomology Electives** 6 

Free Electives*** 9 

A PS 201 The American Governmental System 3 

Agricultural Electives* 9 

Entomology Electives** 6 

Free Ellectives*** 18 

*FC 311 Field Crops *CN 411 The Principles of Genetics 

*FC 414 Weeds and their Control HRT 222 Introduction to Horticulture 

*BO 20:{ Introduction to Syste- *PP 315 Plant Diseases 

matic Botany *Z0 301 Animal Physiology 

*BO 412 General Bacteriology *ZO 315 Animal Parasitology 

*BO 421 Plant Physiology 
*CH 215 (Juantitative Analysis 
*CH 351 Introductory Biochemistry 



* The above-mentioned Agricultural Electives are recommended. 
** A suggested sequence of Entomology courses follows: 

ENT 501, Insect Morphology: ENT 511, Systematic Entomology; ENT 551. Applied 

Entmology: ENT 542, Inmmature Insects. 

Additional Entomology courses may be taken if all other requirements are fulfilled. 
***For requirements respecting Social Sciences, Advanced Military, and Agricultural 

Electives, see the General Agricultural Curriculum. 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 



Professor J. A. RiGNEY, Head of the Depuri nnut 

Professors R. L. Anderson, R. E. Comstock, Gertrude M. Cox, A. L. 
FiNKLER. H. L. Lucas. D. D. Mason, R. J. Monroe, H. F. Robin- 
son, H. Fairfieij) Smith 

Associate Professors C. C. CoCKERHAM, R. J. Hader, D. G. Horvitz 

Assistcnit Pro'fessors W. W. G. SMART, F. J. Verlinden, Jack Fleischer 

Instrnetor Sarah Carroi.i, 

Resident Collaborator C. B. CARNEY 

52 



AGRICULTURE 



— — — — — — — — —_ — _ — — —OBJECTIVES 

The extension of the use of statistics to more and more diverse tields of 
application has steadily increased since the first World War. Industry is 
placing- increasing reliance on statistical methods to control the quality 
of goods in the process of manufacture and to determine the acceptability 
of goods already produced. Statistical procedures are becoming basic 
tools for making weather forecasts, crop and livestock estimates, busi- 
ness trend predictions, opinion polls, and the like. Furthermore, all fields 
of research are fast realizing the importance of statistical aids in plan- 
ning, analyzing and interpreting the results of investigation. 

The Department of Statistics is a part of the Institute of Statistics. 
It provides instruction, consultation, experimental, and computational 
service for all other depaitments of all schools in the college. The Agri- 
cultural Expei'iment Station receives assistance in designing experiments, 
analyzing, and interpreting results. CJovernmental agencies an<l other 
institutions use the facilities of the Department. The range and quality 
of data handled furnish an excellent background for training students in 
the use of statistical procedures in such fields as the plant, animal, and 
social sciences and industrial engineering. 

— — — — — — — — _ _ ____ CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in Expei-imental Statistics is based on the geneial cur- 
riculum for the School of Agriculture except that the requirement of 
elective courses may be distributed in six departments on the cami)us 
(not necessarily six departments in the School of Agriculture). 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — FACILITIES 

A laboratory equipped with the l)est facilities availal)L' is maintained. 
Calculating machines, comptometers, and International Business Ma- 
chines are used constantly. Students have an opportunity to get actual 
experience in the use of these machines and to learn the types of data 
for which each is best suited. 



FIELD CROPS 



Professor P. H. Harvey, Head iff Dc pari me tit 

Professors W. C. GREGORY, G. C. Ki.ixcMAN, R. L. LovvuRN, T. J. Mann, 

G. K. MiDDLETON, R. p. Moore 
Associate Professors D. S. ChambLEE, D. U. GerSTEL, C. H. HansoN, 

P. A. Miller 
Assistatif Professors (". .-X. BuiM, I. T. CARLSON, G. L. .loNES. ,J. A. 
Mauney, D. E. Morei.ani). L. L. IMih.lips, C. L. Rmyne, .Ir.. D. L. 
Thompson, R. P. Upchircii 
histriictor W. X. LEWIS 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — —OBJECTIVES 

The curriculum in Field Crops has as its objectives training the stu- 
dent in the fundamental i)rinciples of the plant sciences, along with 
the application of these principles to the problems of crop pioduction. 

The importance of agronomic training in North Carolina agriculture 
is evidenced by the fact that North Carolina ranks third among the 
states in cash income from farm crops. Yet the maximum potential 
production of farm crops has by no means been attained. With continued 
improvement in varieties, cultural practices, and cropping methods, fur- 
ther advances will be made. In carrying out this broad program there 
is and will continue to be a real need in North Carolina for men well 
tiained in plant breeding, crop production and management, and re- 
lated fields. 

53 



AGRICULTURE 

FACILITIES — — _ — — ______ ____ 

Williams Hall, which is shared by Field Crops and Soils, provides 
adequate office, laboratory, and classroom space for the entire teaching, 
reasearch and extension personnel of the department. In addition to the 
research laboratories for staff and graduate student use, several well- 
equipped laboratories are maintained to serve the needs of the teaching 
program. A library is equipped with books and periodicals dealing with 
agronomic and closely related subjects. Greenhouses are situated directly 
in the rear of Williams Hall to serve the needs for such facilities in the 
teaching and research programs. Much of the research is carried out on 
the campus at Raleigh and at some seventeen experiment stations located 
throughout the state. Students have the opportunity of observing, first- 
hand, various phases of this research. Furthermore, many students gain 
valuable experience as well as financial assistance by working part-time 
during the school year or full-time in the summer in one of these re- 
search programs. 

OPPORTUNITIES— ___ ______ ____ 

Graduate in Field Crops are trained to fill positions as County Exten- 
sion Agents; farm operators and managers; salesmen in seed and ferti- 
lizer companies and similar commercial concerns; seed analysts; and as 
leaders in various forms of agricultural development work. The Field 
Crops curriculum also offers training for those students who might want 
to continue their education with graduate study in preparation for 
extension, teaching, or reseaz'ch positions with state or federal institu- 
tions or private industry. 

STUDENT TOUR— ___ ______ ____ 

One of the highlights of the undergraduate curriculum is a tour of the 
state taken by students majoring in Field Crops and Soils during the 
junior year. This tour is normally taken immediately following the end 
of the spring term and lasts for approximately six days. During this 
time the student visits all of the principal farming regions in the state 
and has an opportunity to observe management practices used on I'epre- 
sentative farms in each region. He also visits a number of the state 
agricultural experiment stations as well as various commercial concerns 
such as fertilizer manufacturers, seed producers, and tobacco companies. 
This tour sei'ves the purpose of providing the student with a better con- 
cept of the various agricultural enterprises throughout North Carolina. 

CURRICULUM IN FIELD CROPS — — — — — — — — — — 

The Field Crops curriculum is designed to meet the interests of the 
student desiring a broad training in the field in order that he may be 
better equipped to cope with the increasing complex array of problems 
confronting the general agronomist. This curriculum also provides for 
the training of specialists in Field Crops, those students interested in a 
more intensive plan of study which will prepare them for specialization 
in some segment of the field or for graduate work. 

The curriculum is divided into two options which provide a diversity 
of training to fit the particular needs of the individual. The student may 
elect one of the following options: (1) General Field Crops Option; (2) 
Special Field Crops Option. 

The student should elect one of the options no later than the end of 
his sophomore year and preferably at the end of his freshman year. 

GENERAL FIELD CROPS OPTION ______ ____ 

1 See page 38. 

2 See page 40. 



54 



AGRICULTURE 



(Jeneral requirements as outlined 
Courses required by department 



the cataloj;, page 10. 



FC 211 Field Crops I 

FC 311 Field ( rops II 

FC 312 Pastures and Forajfe Crops 

FC 413 Plant Breeding 

FC 414 Weeds and Their Control 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

ENT 312 Kconomic Kntomoloyy 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 

SOI 302 Soils and Plant Growth or 

SOI 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 



Electives in Asriculture and Forestry 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



31 

19 



-SPECIAL FIELD CROPS OPTION 



1 

2 



See pa^e 38. 



See Pajre 40. 



3 

A 
I 
V 

4 



General requirements as outlined in the catalog, paue 10. 
Courses required by department 

FC 211 Field Crops I 

F^NT 312 Kconomic P^ntomologv 

BO 421 Plant Physiolojjy 

G\ 411 The Principles of Genetics 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 

SOI 302 Soils and Plant (Jrowth or 

SOI 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 



19 

At least 16 hours will be elected from the following courses, the 
choice beinjj dependent upon whether the student wishes special 
training in Crop i'roduction. Plant Breeding, or \N eed Control: 



.AI 312 Principles of Ijyestock Nutrition 

BO 203 Introduction to Systematic Botany 

BO 410 Plant Histology and Microtechnique 

BO 412 (Jeneral Bacteriology 

BO 441 Plant Ecology 

BO 512 Morphology of \ ascular Plants 

BO 513 Plant Anatomy 

BO 521 Systematic Botany of Monocot I'amilies 

BO 523 Systematic Botany of Dicot Tamilies 

CH 103 (Jeneral and (Jualilafiye ( hemistry 

CH 103L Seniimicro (^ualitatiye Analysis 

CH 211, 212 (Juantitatiye Analysis 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
1 
4-4 



55 



AGRICULTURE 



Quantitative Analysis 4 

Organic C hemistry 5-5 

Organic Chemistrv 3-3 

Field Crops II 3 

Advanced Pastures and Forage Crops 2 

Plant Breeding 3 

Weeds and Their Control 3 

Plant Breeding .Methods 3 

Genetics 4 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus B, C 3-3 

Diseases of Field Crops 3 

General Physics 4 

Soils and PJant Growth 3 

Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

Soil Classification 3 

Soil Physics 4 

Soil Chemistry 4 

Introduction to Statistics 3 
Experimental Statistics for Biological 

Sciences, I, II 4-3 

ZO 301 Animal Physiology 3 

Electives in Agriculture and Forestry 15 



CH 215 




CH 421, 


422 


CH 425, 


426 


FC 311 




FC 412 




FC 413 




FC 414 




FC 541 




GN 512 




.MA 211. 


212 


PP 515 




PY 212 




SOI 302 




SOI 341 




SOI 352 




SOI 511 




SOI 521 




ST 311 




ST 511, 


512 



GENETICS 



Professor S. G. STEPHENS, Head 

Associate Professors D. S. Grosch, B. W. Smith 

Assistant Professor Richard Charles Lewontin 

Cooperating with the following Associate Members of the Faculty: 

Field Crops— D. U. Gerstel, W. C. Gregory, W. C. Hanson, P. H. 
Harvey, G. L. Jones, T. J. Mann, G. K. Middleton, P. A. 
Miller, D. L. Thompson 
Animal Industry — H. A. Stewart, J. E. Legates 
Horticulture — W. S. Barham, F. D. Cochran, F. L. Haynes, G. W. 

Schneider 
Poultry — E. W. Glazener 
Statistics— C. C. Cockerham, R. E. Comstock, H. F. Robinson 

OBJECTIVES— — — — — ______ ____ 

The Genetics faculty offers instruction at advanced undergraduate 
and graduate levels. Graduate courses are available for students majoring 
in any of the animal and plant sciences, as well as for those wishing to 
complete requirements for the Master's or Doctor's degree in Genetics. 

At North Carolina State College there are no sharp divisions along 
departmental lines between the theoretical and applied aspects of ge- 
netics. Courses embodying genetic principles are also offered by the five 
cooperating departments listed above. 

FACILITIES — — — __ ______ ____ 

Facilities are available for carrying out research projects in the Ge- 
netics Faculty and also, on a cooperative basis in other departments as 
indicated by the nature of the project. 



56 



AGRICULTURE 

HORTICULTURE 



Professor F. D. Cochran, Head of Department 

Professors J. L. Etchells, M. E. GARDNER, J. B .GARTNER. J. M. 

./ENKiNs, Jr.. I. D. Jones. E. B. Morrow. Ci. O. Randall. G. \V. 

Schneider 
Associate Profesno)s W. S. Barham. F. L. Haynes. Jr., Robert Schmidt 

(Emeritus) 
Assistant Professor C. L. McCoMBs 

— — — — — — — — — — — ___ —OBJECTIVES 

The field of horticulture is concerned with the application of basic 
scientific principles to the production, handling, and marketing of fruits, 
vegetables, and ornamental plants and also to the processing of fruits 
and vegetables. 

The variations in climatic conditions found in North Carolina are 
conducive to the production of a wide variety of horticultural crops 
which are distributed throughout the state as commercial enteiprises and 
as home gardens. While these crops now represent an important segment 
of agriculture in the state, further e.xpansion will be realized with 
development of adapted varieties, mechanization and intensification of 
cultural practices, and improvement of handling and marketing methods. 

— — — — — — — — —_ — __— _ FACILITIES 

The department has one of the best physical plants in the South for 
training students in Horticulture. Kilgore Hall, the new building to 
house Horticulture and Forestry, was completed in 1952 and contains 
adequate office, classroom, and laboratory space as well as necessary 
equipment for a well-rounded program of teaching and research. The 
departmental library, which supplements the College library, contains 
about twenty-five thousand technical and popular bulletins and current 
periodicals and journals coveiing all phases of Horticulture. 

A greenhouse range makes approximately 25,000 sq. ft. of glass avail- 
able for research and teaching. Nine cold storage rooms make possible 
intensive investigations dealing with storage, handling, and breeding 
problems. 

A student laboratory with cold storage facilities is located on a twenty- 
five acre tract near the city limits of West Raleigh. Student gardens, 
orchards, nursery, flower plots, and vineyards are utilized for class 
instruction. Field lesearch problems are conducted on this student lab- 
oratory farm and at ten of the branch stations and laboratoiies located 
in the various geographical sections of the state. Students have the op- 
portunity of observing, firsthand, various phases of this research. Many 
students gain valuable e.xperience as well as financial help by working 
part-time during the school year, or full-time in the summer, assisting 
in these programs. 

New and enlaiged facilities are available in the field of fruit and vege- 
table processing for both teaching and research. These include a modern, 
well-equipped processing laboratory; adjoining chemical and bacterio- 
logical laboratories; a freezing room; and storage lockers for frozen 
products. 

— — — — — — — — ___ — __ OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates in Horticulture hold many different types of positions in- 
cluding those of County E.xtension -Agents; farm operators; orchard, 
nursery, greenhouse and flower shop managers; research and promotional 
workers with commercial seed, floral, chemical, and food companies; 
processing plant foremen; inspectors and quality control technologists; 
agents with the U.S. I). .A. Regulatory Service; and as leaders in other 
phases of agricultural development. 

57 



AGRICULTURE 



CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURE- ______ ____ 

The curriculum in Horticulture, which leads to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Horticulture, provides traning- for developing a background 
in the principles of the plant sciences and the application of these prin- 
ciples to problems of production, breeding, handling, storage, marketing, 
and processing of horticulaural crops. 

Five options are offered horticultural majors: (1) General Horti- 
culture; (2) Fruit Crops; (8) Ornamental Crops; (4) Vegetable Crops; 
(5) Fruit and Vegetable Processing. 

I. GENERAL HORTICULTURE OPTION 

A. General curriculum requirements, (see pages 38, and 40). 

B. Requirements by major field 

Credits 

SOI 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

BO 421 FMant Physiology 4 

ENT 312 Economic Entomology 3 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

HRT 481 Breeding of Horticultural Plants 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

19 

C. Electives in Horticulture 12-22 

D. Electives in Agriculture and Forestry 9-19 

II. FRUIT CROPS OPTION 

A. General curriculum requirements, (see pages 38, and 40) 

B. Same as 1(B) above 

C. Requirements in specialized field 

1. HRT 321, 421, 432, .532, and 562 16 

D. Electives in Agriculture and Forestry 15 

III. ORNAMENTAL CROPS OPTION 

A. General curriculum requirements, (see pages 38, and 40) 

B. Same as 1(B) above 

C. Requirements in specialized field 

1. HRT 201, 202. 212 or 412, 301, 311 or 442, 441, 512 20-21 

D. Electives in Agriculture and Forestry 10-11 

IV. VEGETABLE CROPS OPTION 

A. General curriculum requirements, (see pages 38. and 40) 

B. Same as 1 (B) above 

C. Reuuirements in specialized field 

1. HRT 321, 421, 432, 562, 571 15 

D. Electives in Agriculture and Forestry 16 

V. FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROCESSING OPTION 

A. General curriculum requirements, (see pages 38, and 40) 

B. Required by major department 

1. In Horticulture 

HRT 222, 321, 462. 521, 522 12 

2. In other departments 

AGE 331, BO 412, CH 211, 212 

CH 421, 422, PY (4 SEMESTER CREDITS) 29 

C. Electives in Agriculture and Forestry 10 

58 



AGRICULTURE 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 



Professor D. E. Ellis, Head of the Department 

Professors S. G. LEHMAN (Emeritus), J. L. Allison, C. N. Clayton, 

F. A. Haasis, L. W. Xielskn, C. J. Nusbaum 
Associate Professors T. T. Hebert, A. Kelman, G. B. Lucas, J. N. Sasser 
Assistant Professors W. E. Cooper, N. N. Winstead 

________ ______ —OBJECTIVES 

Instruction in Plant Pathology is offered at both the undergraduate 
and graduate levels. Underjrraduate instruction is designed to provide 
introductory and advanced courses in the nature and control of plant 
diseases to students majoring in agronomy, horticulture, agricultural 
education, and forestry and to provide students the fundamental train- 
ing necessary for graduate study in Plant Pathology. Graduate courses 
are available for students majoring in any of the plant sciences as well 
as for those wishing to complete requirements for the degrees of Master 
of Science or Doctor of Philosophy in Plant Pathology. 
________ ______ — FACILITIES 

Facilities consist of ample teaching and research laboratories, green- 
houses, fields for experimental work, modern laboratory equipment, and 
other facilities essential to advanced research and teaching in Plant 
Pathology. 



POULTRY SCIENCE 



Professor E. W. Glazener, Htad of the Depurtment 

Professors C. W. BARBER. R. S. Dearstyne. Emeritus 

Associate Professors J. W. Kelley. T. T. Brown. H. W. Garren. C. H. 

Hill 
Assista}it Professors W. L. BLOW, F. W. Cook. D. Fromm. H. L. Bim- 

gardner, G. a. Martin 

________ ______ —OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Poultry Science has as its objectives training the 
student in the principles of general poultry husbandry and related scien- 
tific fields, and the application of these principles to poultry biology; 
judging; preparation, grading, and processing of poultry products; 
hatchery and plant management; breeding; nutrition; and diseases. 
Through teaching, research, and extension, the department serves stu- 
dents, poultrvmen, and allied industries. Poultry is an expanding industry 
in North Carolina with a gross income exceeding $120,000,000 annually. 
________ ______ CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in Poultry Science, which leads to the digrei- of 
Bachelor of Science, is designed to give the student adequate and broad 
training in poultry science as preparation for work in the poultry in- 
dustry, in allied fields, and as extension poultry specialists. The curricu- 
lum conforms to the General Curriculum of the School of Agriculture. 
________ ______ — FACILITIES 

The teaching, research, and extension staff of the Department of 
Poultry Science are housed in Scott Hall. This building, which was com- 
pleted in 15>52-53, contains offices, classrooms, laboratories, and bird 
rooms. The laboratories and bird rooms are well equipped for teaching 
general poultry, hatchery management, poultry products, breeding, nu- 

59 



AGRICULTURE 



trition, and diseases. A student library and readinjii: room in Scott Hall 
provides access to poultry publications and scientific journals. Coopera- 
tively with the N. C. Department of Agriculture, a disease diagnostic 
laboratory is maintained in Scott Hall. Some of the birds received by 
the laboratory serve as material for teaching. 

The Department maintains oft'-campus teaching and research facilities 
at its Central Poultry Plant, located about two miles from the campus 
proper, and at two Experimental Station farms in the eastern and 
western parts of the state. A unit of layers is maintained exclusively at 
the Central Plant for teaching general poultry and judging. 

The Central Plant consists of three units, two used for chickens and 
one for turkeys. Of the two units used for chickens, one is used primarily 
for rearing potential layers and foj- nutritional studies with broilers, and 
the second unit contains principally housing facilities for layers. Ap- 
proximately 2,600 layers are housed each year for research and teaching 
purposes. A brick building, with this unit, provides additional facilities 
for teaching and research. Incubator, chick starting, and egg grading 
facilities are maintained on the first floor and a room equipped for con- 
ducting demonstrations and laboratories is located on the second floor. 

The third unit consists of a turkey plant with two laying houses, two 
brooder houses, two confinement shelters, a feed mixing unit, and facili- 
ties foi' incubating, brooding, and ranging turkeys. 
OPPORTUNITIES— — — — ______ ____ 

Graduates of the Poultry Department hold positions as poultry farm 
managers; poultry and egg inspectors; field representatives and service- 
men for hatcheries, feed manufacturers, poultry processors, equipment 
companies, biological supply houses and other commercial concerns allied 
to poulti\v; journalism and public relations; self -employment; and teach- 
ing, extension, and research specialists. 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES— _______ _____ 

The Department sponsors two student activities, the Poultry Science 
Club and the Poultry Judging Team. Purposes of the Poultry Science 
Club are to bring together students and staff members who are interested 
in poultry, to provide programs of interest to both groups, and to partici- 
pate in the activities of the Department and of the School of Agriculture. 

The Poultry Judging Teams allow students to apply what they have 
learned in the classes of poultry judging. Each year qualified students 
selected for the teams go to the Southern Intercollegiate Poultry Judg- 
ing Contest and to the National Intercollegiate Poultry Judging Contest 
to compete with teams from other colleges throughout the United States. 
The trophies won by the State College teams are on display in Scott Hall. 
GENERAL CURRICULUM IN POULTRY SCIENCE — — _ _ _ _ 

See General Curriculum in Agriculture, page 40. 

A minimum of 146 semester hours is required for graduation. 

Students planning to major in Poultry Science should elect the General 
Curriculum in Agiiculture. Those students who, prior to entering on the 
General Curriulcum, decide to major in Poultry Science should consult 
with the Poultry Department course adviser by the end of the fall se- 
mester of the freshman year. Those students who, after entering the 
General Curriculum, elect to major in Poultry Science should consult with 
the course adviser as early as possible in the freshman or sophomore 
years, preferably by the end of the fall semester of the freshman year. 



1 



See page 38. 

Credits 
.Agricultural Elecfives (Advised) 7 

BO 102 General Hoi any 3 

CH 203 General and (irganic Chemistry and 

CH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 7 



60 



AGRICULTURE 



EC 201 Kconomics and 



Kconomics of AKrUuKure * 

Chicken and I'urkey I'rodmtion * 



AGC 212 

I'O 201 

MS 201. 202 .Military Science i»r 

or 
AS 221, 222 Air Science 
TK 201. 202 Physical Education 



4 
2 

.13 



Auricultural Electives (Advised) j| 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills } 

HI 2«1 The I'nited States in Western Civilization J 

1>Y 211 General Physics and 

SOI 200 Soils , , c . \ 

|>s; 201 The American Governmental System o 

P() 301 Poultry JudKinp: and Processing 4 

PO 303 Biology of the Fowl ^ 

ZO 301 Animal Physiology and 

Principles of Genetics '» 

Advanced Military or Air Science or 

Advised Electives ^ 



GN 111 



39 

English Elective ^ 
|»0 101 Poultry Diseases and 

BO 412 General Bacteriology ** 

PO 402 Commercial I'oultry Farm and 

Hatchery Management * 

PO 403 Poultry Seminar ^ 

I'O 520 Poultry Breeding and 

PO 521 I'ouUry Nutrition ^ 

Social Sciences and Humanities o 

RS 301 Sociolojry of Rural Life 3 

Advanced Military or Air Science or 

Advised Electives " 

38 
____ _ _ RURAL SOCIOLOGY 



Professor C. Horace Hamilton. Ihad of thr Drimrtmcit 

"^Z fv;/,.S»!t"FREDEE,CK L. BATES, SH,:,.T0S- G. LmvKBV. James 

N. Young 



OBJECTIVES 



The principal aim of this department is to teach students the principles 
and techniques for understan.linjr human ^noup bt-havior. More specifi- 




eraauate leveis lor rui.n :^^^v iw.w^,...... . — , ;: r: . . „.;c„ 

work- (3) to solve problems in human ^roup relations through scientific 
research; and (4> to extend research results to the people of the state. 

The Department of Rural Socioio>ry is closely related to and dependent 
upon other social science departjnents at State ColieRe and at other units 



61 



AGRICULTURE 

of The Consolidated University. Students majorinj>- in rural sociology 
are expected to take courses in such departments as Psychology, Statis- 
tics, Economics, Agricultural Economics, History and Political Science. 
Agricultral electives may be chosen by rural sociology students from 
a list of courses most closely related to sociology, including economic 
theory, adult education, agricultural cooperation, agricultural policy, 
genetics, statistics, and human physiology. 

The Department also functions in a similar service capacity to other 
departments, both in the School of Agriculture and in the entire college. 
Students majoring in any of the technical agricultural curricula may take 
courses in rural sociology as electives in either social science or agri- 
culture; courses offered by the Department may be chosen as social 
science electives by students from any department in the College. 

CURRICULUM ____ _______ ____ 

As will be noted below, students in rural sociology have a wide choice 
of courses. This is true not only in the social sciences but also in the 
physical and biological sciences, the humanities, and technical agriculture. 
Consequently, the student can modify his program as his vocational and 
avocational goals change, thus qualifying himself for further professional 
ti'aining or for employment requiring specialized knowledge. 

FACILITIES — ____ ______ ____ 

The Department of Rural Sociology is constantly engaged in socio- 
logical studies of rural population, rural standards and levels of living, 
rural communities, and related problems. Funds, laboratory equipment, 
and other facilities for this work are provided by the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station and are available for the use of advanced students 
ander the supervision of faculty members. In a broader sense the entire 
state is a laboratory for the study of rural social problems. The field 
work phases of the research projects may be carried out by advanced 
students at appropriate times throughout the year. 

OPPORTUNITIES— — — — ______ ____ 

Graduates of this Department may obtain employment as community 
organization specialists, county agents, social welfare workers, social 
statisticians, administrators and managers of both public and private 
social agencies, college teachers, research workers, and in many other 
capacities. Among the institutions offering employment to graduates are 
land-grant colleges, agi-icultural experiment stations, and extension 
services; the United States Departments of Agriculture, State, and 
Health, Education and Welfare; state departments of welfare, health, 
and education; faim journals and newspapers; voluntary social agencies, 
such as Red Cross, Community Chest, and Boy Scouts; and rural fra- 
ternal organizations and cooperatives. The range of vocational pursuits 
open to rural sociology graduates is constantly widening. 



CURRICULUM IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY- _ _ _ - 
A minimum of 116 credits required for graduation 

1 See page 38. 



O .\(JC 212 Economics of Agriculture 

CH 101 General Inorganic Chemistry 

CH 20.3 (Jeneral and Organic Chemistry 

EC 201 Economics 

HI 261 The United States in Western Civilization 

PY 211 General Physics 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psvchologv 

RS .301 Sociology of Rural Life 

62 



Credits 






3 


4 








4 


3 








3 





4 


3 





3 






AGRICULTURE 



2 


2 


1 


T 


9 


20 


J 





:{ 








■i 





:i 


.'{ 








:i 


2 








■■i 


3 


.i 


3 


3 



18 18 



K 


ti 


6 


H 


3 


3 


18 


15 



i:U'clivfs 
MS 201. 202 Mili(:irv Sci«'nce 

or 
AS 221. 222 Air Scit-iue 
I'E 201. 202 rhysital KHiicalion 



SOI 200 Soils 

EN(; 231 l{asic Speakinj? Skills 

KNG 382 Ikukjirounds of linKlish Civilization 

PS 201 The Ameriran (Jovt-rnmental Syslom 

HS 321 Introduction to Social Research 

KS 112 Rural Social Structure 

SOC 251 (Jeneral Anthropolojjy 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 

Klectives 

Advanced Miiitarv or Air Science 



Knji'ii^h elective 

Four courses in rural soci<»lo>iy 

and related social sciences 

Elect ives 

Advanced Military or Air Science 

Elect ives 



— — — __________ -SOILS 

Professor J. W. FiTTS, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor Homer C. Folks, In Charge, Soils Teaehing 

Professors VV. V. Bartholomew. N. T. Coleman, \V. E. Colvvell. X. S. 

Hali,, J. F. LuTZ, S. L. Tisdale. \V. G. Woltz, \V. W. WooniiorsE, 

Jr. 
Associate Professors W. U. Lee, K. H. McCRACKEN. A. Memlum. J. K. 

Piland, W. H. Rankln, and C. H. M. Van Bavel 
Assistant I'rofessors E. J. Kamprath, C. B. McCants. P. U. Reid. R. H. 

VoLK, S. B. Weki) 

— — — — — — — — ______ _ OBJECTIVES 

The primary objectives of the Soils curriculum are to train students 
in the fundamental principles of Soils, their utilization and nianatrenient. 
Soils constitutes one of the laiKi'^t capital investments in farming anu 
proper soil manajrement is essential for efficient production. Therefore, 
the demand l)y education, research and service agencies and by industry 
for men trained in soils should continue to be great. 

— — — — — — — — ______ _ FACILITIES 

Excellent office, lecture rooms and laboratory facilities are providrd 
for the Department of Soils in Williams Hall, a new, modern buildinir. 
In addition, ^rreerdiouses are located immeiliately to the south of Williams 
Hall in which both teaching and research are conducted. With aji exten- 
sive research protrram in operation it is necessary to carry on part of 
this research at out-lyiiiK experimental farms. There are seventeen 
experimental farms located throujrhout the state in the major ajrricul- 

63 



AGRICULTURE 



tural areas. Both undeiKiaduate and graduate students have the op- 
portunity of observing and participating in current research on these 
farms. 

OPPORTUNITIES— — — — ______ ____ 

Soils graduates are trained to fill positions as County Extension agents; 
farm operators and managers; Soil Conservation Service representatives; 
technicians or salesmen in fertilizer companies and similar commercial 
concerns; and as leaders in other areas of agricultural work. Provision 
is also made in the soils curriculum for those students who wish to ob- 
tain a more thorough training in Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and 
Biological sciences in anticipation of graduate study. Students with ad- 
vanced degrees have unlimited opportunities in teaching, research and 
extension and state and federal institutions as well as increasing 
opportunities with commercial concerns. 

STUDENT TOUR— __— ______ ____ 

One of the highlights of the undergraduate curriculum is a tour of the 
State taken jointly by the students in Soils and Field Crops during the 
junior year. This tour is normally taken immediately following the end 
of the spring term and lasts for approximately six days. During this 
time the student visits all of the principal farming regions in the state 
and has an opportunity to observe managment practices used on repre- 
sentative farms in each region. He also visits a number of the state 
agricultural experiment stations as well as various commercial concerns 
such as fertilizer manufacturers, seed producers, and tobacco companies. 
This tour serves the purpose of providing the student with a better con- 
cept of the various agricultural enterprises throughout North Carolina. 

GENERAL SOIL SCIENCE CURRICULUM ____ ____ 



The general Soils curriculum is designed to give a student basic train- 
ing in agricultural science with emphasis on soils as a medium for plant 
growth. 

146 Credits required for graduation 

1 See page 38 

Credits 
O CH 101 General Inorganic Chemistry 

(if not taken in Freshman Sear) 4 

CH 103 General and (Qualitative Chemistry or 

CH 203 General and Organic Chemistry 4 or 4 or 

EC 201 Economics and 

AGC 212 Economics of .\gricultiire 3 3 

PY 211 General Physics and 

HI 261 The I'nited State.s in Western 

Civilization 4 or 3 4 or 3 

Third and Fourth year required 

courses or 

.Advised electives 6 6 or 9 

MS 201, 202 Military Science or 

.\S 221, 222 .Vir Science 2 2 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 1 1 



19 or 20 19 or 20 



64 



AGRICULTURE 

A. Requirod Courses 

("redils 

O KN(; 231 liasic Speaking Skills 3 

*^ Knjrlish Klertive 3 

^ MIG 120 Physical (;tM)l<))rv 3 

I l*S 201 Anu-rican (lovernmental S\stt'm 3 

I RS 301 Soci(»l«»|Lry of Rural Life 3 

V Humanities 6 

A IK) 112 (General liacterioloKv 4 

^ HO 121 IMant PhvsioloKv I 

SOI 200 Soils 4 

SOI 302 Soils and IMant Growth 3 

SOI 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SOI :r>2 Soil Classification 3 

SOI l»>i Soil Conservation and Mana^rement 3 

45 

H. Advised Klectives 

1. If advanced military is taken a student should elect 12 addi- 
tional credits from the following; list. Courses other than those 
listed may be taken with the approval of the adviser. 

2. If advanced military is not taken. 21 additional credits should 
be elected from the following list. Courses other than those 
listed may be taken with the approval of the adviser. 

AGK 321 Irrigation. Drainage and Terracing 3 

ACJC 303 Farm Manajjement I 3 

AGC 10.') Agricultural Law 3 

CH 215 (Quantitative Analvsis 4 

FC 211 Field Crops 3 

FC 312 Pasture and Forage Crops 3 

FC 413 Plant Hreedinj; 3 

VC 414 Weeds and Iheir ( ontrol 3 

AI 201 Elements of Dairy Science t 

AI 202 Fundamentals of Animal Husbandry 4 

HO 203 Introduction to Svstematic Hotanv 3 

HO in Plant Kcoloiiy 3 

ENT 312 Economic Entomolo^xy 3 

FOR 311 Principles of Farm Forestry 2 

(JN 111 Principles (»f (Jenetics 3 

MK; 330 .Mineralo>,ry 3 

HRT 121 Fruit Production 3 

HRT 132 Neuetable Product i<»n 3 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 3 

PO 201 Chicken and Turkey Production t 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 



— — STATISTICS 

See Experimental Statistics 



Courses which are listed as required in the .Iiinior and Senior >ear may 
be taken in the Sophomore >ear with permission df the adviser. It is 
desirable for the student to take SOI 200. HO 121 and MKJ 120 in the 
Sophomore year if possible. 

65 



AGRICULTURE 

ZOOLOGY 



Professor F. S. Barkalow, Jr., Head of the Department 
Professors B. B. BRANDT, R. Harkema 

Associate Professors R. B. Casady, D. S. Grosch, T. L. Quay 
Assistant Professor W. W. Hassler. E. M. Lowry 
Instructor H. A. OOREN 

OBJECTIVES— — — — — ___ — _— ____ 

The Department of Zoology at North Carolina State College is organ- 
ized to serve three purposes. (1) It serves the schools of Agriculture, 
Forestry, and Education by teaching courses of a fundamental nature 
essential to complete understanding and mastery of applied science. 
(2) It provides training in technical zoology which prepares students lor 
positions in industrial and government laboratories. (3) It provides under- 
graduate curricula leading to graduate and professional training in the 
dental, medical, veterinary, and advanced zoological sciences. (4) It 
furnishes potential leaders in the field of wildlife conservation and game 
management through a curriculum in Wildlife Conservation and Manage- 
ment which is offered as part of the work in zoology. 

CURRICULUM IN WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT— — 

Interest in wildlife, hunting, and fishing is prerequisite to a career as 
a wildlife biologist, but enthusiasm alone is not sufi^icient. A student must 
possess scholastic aptitude, initiative, and the ability to use the tools of 
pure and applied biology. 

The wildlife curriculum is based on the following principles: all major 
forms of plant and animal life must be considered in wildlife manage- 
ment; if provided a favorable environment, a wildlife species will usually 
produce surpluses which can be harvested. Since wildlife conservation 
and management is essentially applied biology, the curriculum is de- 
signed to provide a thorough knowledge of zoology and botany. 

Every phase of the wildlife field involves numerous contacts with the 
public. The ability to speak and write effectively is a valuable asset. The 
course requirements in English and the humanities were selected to pro- 
vide such training. 

Stream pollution and fisheries problems require a knowledge of chem- 
istry for their solution. Adequate courses are included in the curriculum 
to satisfy this training need. 

CURRICULUM IN ZOOLOGY— ______ ____ 

The curriculum in Zoology is designed to train the student in the 
fundamental principles of zoology and the application of these principles 
to the various fields of agriculture. The curriculum prepares students 
for further training in animal ecology, wildlife, or zoology at the grad- 
uate level. It is also available to those pre-veterinary, pre-medical and 
pre-deiital students who wish additional training in the zoological field. 

1. The curriculum in Zoology follows the general curriculum 
in .Vgriculture as outlined in the catalog, page 10. 

2. At least four courses in adit ion to General Zoology will 
be elected from offerings of the Zoology Department. Two 
of these must be (1) Comparative .Anatomy, and (2) 
.Animal Physiology. 

3. Recommended courses in allied fields will include: genetics, 
entomology, bacteriology, systematic botany, plant ecol- 
ogy, and plant pathology. 

4. .\ foreign language is advisable and recommended for 
those preparing for graduate study. 

66 



AGRICULTURE 



— — — — — — — — —-_ — — __ OPPORTUNITIES 

The zoolojjy curriculum is sufficiently flexible to provide the basic 
traininj; for students who wish to continue their education at the jrrad- 
uate level, or its equivalent, in the numerous special phases of the bio- 
lojrical sciences, such as parasitology, ticnetics, anatomy, physiology, 
wildlife, the allied medical and veterinary fields, and others. 

Five catejrories of positions are available to wildlife graduates: ad- 
ministrative, law enforcement, refu>;e, education, and research. Agencies 
employing- the majority of trained men are: State names anil tish depart- 
ments, U. S. P'ish and Wildlife Service, U. S. Forest Service. U. S. Soil 
Conservation Service, U. S. National Park Service, and other fedeial 
land-use departments. The curriculum is designed to furnish a technical 
and practical foundation for employment with these ajrencies. 

Employment opportunities continue to be Kood, especially at the grad- 
uate level. No excess of wildlife graduates is anticii)ated in the im- 
mediate future. 

Unusual advantages are offered by the wide range of natural environ- 
ments in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, Piedmont and Mountain 
Regions. Close cooperation with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources 
Commission provide opportunities for observing developments in wildlife 
management on its fifteen wildlife management and refuge areas. 



SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN WILDLIFE CONSERVATION 
— — — — — — — — __ AND MANAGEMENT 



A(; 101 Agriculture and World Affairs 

HO 101. 102 (ieneral Botany 

KNG 111. 112 Composition 

HI 261 The I'nited States in Western Civilization 

M.\ 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

PS 201 The .American (iovernmental Svstem 

ZO 101. 102 General Zoology 

.MS 101, 102 Militarv Science or 



Credits 



or 
AS 121. 122 Air Science 
FE 101. 102 Physical Education 



3 





3 


3 


3 


3 


3 








1 





3 


3 


3 


2 


2 

1 



18 19 



( H 101 




CH 203 




KC 201 




>IA 112 




PY 211 




ZO 223 




ZO 2.->2 




ZO 321 




MS 201. 


202 


or 




AS 221. 


222 


PE 201. 


202 



I 








1 


.3 








1 





1 


4 








3 


3 






General Inorganic Chemistry 

General and Organic Chemistrx 

Economics 

Analytic (ieomctrx and Calculus A 

(Jeneral Physics 

Comparative Anat<>m> 

Ornithology 

\\ ildlife and Natural Resource Conservation 3 

Militar> Science or 

.\ir Science 2 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

Motany Elecitve 2 

19 18 

67 



AGRICULTURE 



SOI 200 Soils 

HO 203 Introduction to Systematic Hotany 

("H 103 General and (Qualitative Chemistry 

English Elective 
ENT 301 Introduction to Forest Insects or 

ENT 312 Economic Entomology 

FOR 311 Principles of Farm Forestry 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

ZO 301 Animal I'hvsiology 

ZO 521 Fishery Biology 

Advanced Military or Air Science or 

Recommended Electives 



Credits 



4 












3 







1 


3 


or 


3 


3 


or 


3 


2 












3 







3 


3 








17 19 



3 





3 








3 





3 





3 


3 


3 



BO 441 Plant Ecology 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

MIG 120 Physical Geology 

ZO 315 Animal Parasitology 

ZO 522 Animal Ecology 

ZO 551, 552 Wildlife Management 

Advanced Military or Air Science or 

Recommended Elective 3 

Advanced Military or Air Science or 

Free Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 3 



Recommended Electives — Junior and Senior Years 



Students not taking Advanced Military or Air Science are required to 
select nine hours of electives from the following list: 

AGC 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

BO 412 General Bacteriology 4 

BO 521 Systematic Botany of Monocot Families 3 

BO 573 Aquatic Botany 3 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3 

CE 201 Surveying I 3 
lA 203, or Practical Drafting, or 

ME 101 Engineering Drawing 2 or 2 



CURRICULUM FOR PRE-VETERINARY STUDENTS 



AG 101 Agriculture and World Affairs 

BO 101, 102 General Inorganic Chemistry 

CH 101 General Botany 

ENG 111, 112 Composition 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculuc 

ZO 101, 102 General Zoology 

MS 101, 102 Military Science or 

AS 121, 122 Air Science 

PE 101, 102 Physical Education and Hygiene 



3 








4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 








4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



19 20 



68 



AGRICULTURE 



Al 201 




A I 202 




CH 103 




CH 20.{ 




HI 261 




I'Y 211 




!»() 201 




ZO 223 




MS 201. 


202 


AS 221. 


222 


PE 201. 


202 



Klementary Dairy Science 
riindamentals of Animal Industry 
(Jeneral and ({ualitativi- Chemistry 
(Jeneral and Organic Chemistry 
The Inited States in Western Civilization 
(ieneral Physics 
Chicken and Turkey Production 
Comparativf Anatomy 
Military Science or 
Air Science 
Physical Education 



4 


or 0-1 





4 or 1-0 




4 




1 


on 


3 




4 




4 




4 




2 2 




1 1 



19 



18 



CH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 

AGC 212 Economics of Agriculture 

EC 201 General Economics 

ENG English Literature or writing 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

SOI 200 Soils 

PS 201 The American Governmental Svstem 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

Elective Allied Field or Ajjri. Elective. 

& Major Field 

Elective (Humanities and/or Social Sciences) 



3 








3 


3 








3 


3 








4 





3 


3 





3 


3 


3 


3 



18 



19 



With proper choice of courses in years 1-3 and \Nith appropriate admin- 
istrative approval, a maximum of 12 hours at veterinary school can count 
as the senior year for the B.S. in A^jriculture. A total of 146 semester 
house is required for graduation. 

The senior year may be spent at State Collepe. 

In either case, the General curriculum in Agriculture (as olTicially 
approved) will be followed. 



THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



D. W. CoLVARD, Dccu of Agricidtntc 
R. W. CUMMINCS, Director of Rcmarch 



— — — — — — — — _____ _ ESTABLISHMENT 

The Auricultural Experiment Station was establi.shed in accordance 
with an Act of the General Assembly of 1877. Its profrress has been en- 
hanced by several Acts of Conjrress jrivin>r the Station additional funds: 
the Hatch .Act of 1887, the .Adams Act of UHX;. the Purnell Act of 1!»25. 
the Bankhead-.Jones Act of 1S>35. and the Research and Marketing .Act 
of 1!>4<>. The North Carolina (Jeneral .Assembly has allocated to the 
Station annually certain funds from the General Fund. 

________ ______ —OBJECTIVES 

The purpose of the A>rricultural Experiment Station is to study the 
basic Hws of nature underlyinjr a^rricultural enterprises and to develop 
methods for economic production of the highest jrrades of livestock, 



69 



AGRICULTURE 

poultry, and plants on the many soil types and under the varied condi- 
tions existing in North Carolina; to study methods for the control of 
])arasitic insects and organisms that cause serious economic losses of 
animals, poultry, and plants; to find and develop varieties of animals, 
poultry, and plants new and resistant to diseases and the changeable 
conditions prevailing in the state; and to perfect better marketing for 
all agricultural products. 

The staff of the Experiment Station conducts experiments in the green- 
houses and laboratories of the College, and throughout the state on areas 
owned by farmers, on nineteen strategically located experimental farms, 
and on farms rented for short periods. 

The agricultural research aims, through the discovery of new facts, to 
improve the well-being of farmers throughout the state; to strengthen 
the regulartory work of the State Department of Agriculture; to develop 
new and necessary facts for the teaching of sound agricultural principles 
by vocational agricultural instructors, agricultural extension agents, and 
agricultural instructors in the College. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station staff brings to the College many 
experts, whose teaching in many specialized fields of agriculture assures 
the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes much to the 
advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, 
teachers, and investigators necessary in the maintenance of agriculture 
on sound and economic planes. 

PUBLICATIONS _ — — — ______ ____ 

The Agricultural Experiment Station publishes many bulletins and 
scientific papers on results of research conducted by the staff. These are 
free and are sent upon request to anyone in the state. 

SERVICES _____ ______ ____ 

The staff diagnoses and interprets many problems for the farmers of 
North Carolina. It holds council with farmers and others interested in the 
agricultural industry, presents radio programs devoted to the discussion 
of farming procedures, and writes many letters on more specific problems 
of agriculture at the request of farmers, members of garden clubs, and 
manufacturers of fertilizer, fungicides, and insecticides. It also takes 
part in many of the administrative functions of the College. 



COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORK — — 

D. W. COLVARD, Dcuu of Agriculture 

I. 0. SCHAUB, Director Emeritus of Exteiisiou 

David S. Weaver, Director of Extension 

SUPPORT _____ ______ ____ 

The Agricultural Extension Service of State College is conducted co- 
operatively with the United States Department of Agriculture and with 
the one hundred counties in North Carolina. Its work is supported by 
Federal funds derived from the Smith-Lever Act of 1914. the Capper- 
Ketcham Act of 1928, the Bankhead-Jones Act of 19;}5, the Bankhead- 
Flannagan Act of 1945, and by State and County appropriations. Fed- 
eral and State appropiiations are used to maintain an administrative 
and specialist staff and to supplement salaries and travel expenses of 
County Extension Agents, who are located at each county seat in the 
state. 

70 



AGRICULTURE 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — —OBJECTIVES 

The purpose of the Extension Serviee is to take to the rural people of 
North Carolina the latest and best information obtainable for buildinK 
a more prosperous and satisfyinu' life on the farm. In earryin^ out this 
purpose, the College maintains a staff of trained specialists, a system 
of Couty Agents and assistants, and Home Demonstration A),aMits who 
work with the farmer and his family and who administer a state-wide 
educational program. In this program, the Extension Service employs 
a variety of methods and devices. These include methods and results 
demonstrations foi- «:roui) meetinns, a training program for farm leaders 
within the community, and dose contact with organized clubs of men, 
women, and younji- people. The service also publishes a ^leat number 
of pamphlets, bulletins, and circulars which it distributes free. In ad- 
dition, it holds a number of short courses, both on the College campus 
aiul else\yhere throughout the state, to offer rural leaders advice and 
training in creating: better homes and farms and in usinj; more efficient 
farminjr practices. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — —SHORT COURSES 

These courses vary in length from a few days to eight weeks. They are 
designed for young people who desire some training in the principles of 
agriculture, but who find it impossible to take the regular college course, 
and for mature individuals who wish to become familiar with the most 
recent agricultural practices. It is the aim of these courses to make bett.-r 
farmers— to help them produce better fruit, vegetables, livestock, and 
poultry, and to obtain greater satisfaction and profit from the time 
energy, and money expended. Most of the courses will be given during 
the winter months, and a bulletin will be issued each fall announcing 
the courses which will be offered during the following months. This 
bulletin and other information about the short courses may be secured 
by writing to the Director of Short Courses. College Extension Division. 
State College Station. Raleigh. North Carolina. 



71 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 



HENRY L. KAMPHOEFNER, DEAN 



INTRODUCTORY 



In 1948 the School of Design was orf>anized through the combination 
of the existing- Departments of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. 
It is devoted and dedicated to the development of a native architecture 
and its accompanying art forms for the southern region. 

The school in its teaching recognizes the dangers inherent in a ma- 
terialist-mechanistic civilization where there may be an over-reliance on 
the machine and the mechanical devices available for use to man in his 
constructions for shelter. We give attention, therefore, to that lai-ger 
responsibility of architecture, the art of humanizing the environment. 

And, while the natural and organic aspects of design are stressed, the 
international and universal aspects of design are also respected and 
related to the humane patterns of life. We seek to integrate the architect 
as a social human being and the architect as scientist-engineer, and we 
encourage and nuture the architect-engineer as the coordinator of the 
structural dynamics in the over-all pattern of life. 

While our first aim is to serve North Carolina and the regions of the 
south, we believe that our students will be equipped, through the teach- 
ing of the school, to work in any region. 

Because character, a profound devotion, and an absolute professional 
commitment are prime ingredients of any creative activity where the 
social responsibilities are as vital as in architecture and design, we foster 
and cultivate the integrity of the individual. 

Individual creative expression is emphasized as the epitome of good 
design, but teamwork is also encouraged and developed as a necessity of 
humane progress in the machine civilization of the day. We believe that 
the "prima donna" who isolates himself behind the intellectual harrier 
of his own self-sufficiency fails to recognize and understand the import- 
ance and necessity of the formal technique of compromise as a dominant 
factor of design as related to the social pattern of life — just as nature 
in all her workings adjusts to all pressures and all tensions. 

The faculty of the School of Design has been selected for their indi- 
vidual and diverse personal philosophies and their individual yet divergent 
professional qualifications. We have brought together creative personali- 
ties willing in their teaching to subordinate their own professional in- 
terests to the pedagogically more important interests of their students. 
Here a community of scholars working each in his own way searches for 
the truth as he sees it, giving the young student the benefit of his pro- 
fessional knowledge, his technical training, and his experience as a 
citizen. We encourage the student to sift and sort this diversity of 
opinion, even thojigh in this process he is usually stimulated and oc- 
cesionally confounded. In the end we are confident that he arrives through 
this process at an ability to shape his own conclusions. 

To combat the dangers of over-specialization we seek to develop the 
personality and character as a whole. The goal in the growth of the stu- 
dent is not only the mastery of the architectural techniques of the pro- 
fession; but through the stimulation and development of the intellectual 
and emotional capacities together, a readiness is developed to meet the 
challenge of any environment. 

The School of Design is intended to act as an educational center which 
unifies different design professions in the fundamental knowledge and 
methods which they share; its further intention is the education of men 

72 



DESIGN 



who will be competent within the specific demands and limitations of a 
particular professional field of desig:n. The exsistence of contemporary 
desijrn is considered to be a requirement of contemporary man, and the 
j;reatest purpose of contemporary desijrn is considered to be the solution 
of those requirements throujrh full use of the ingenuity and knowledjre 
of contemporary man. Through this point of view the technical and 
factual aspects of desijrn present no confiict with its philosophical and 
aesthetic standards, for one is but the particularization of the other. The 
course is based upon a belief in the basic ambivalence of the process of 
desigrninK- 

The two professional fields, and future ones, have been gi'ouped under 
one broad and unified study of the methods and values which are com- 
mon to all designers, and they are separated only in the study of their 
application in the work of a single profession. Many classes throughout 
the curricula will include students in these professional fields; and for all 
students the course of study is the same during the first year in order 
that, having become more familiar with the whole scope of activity in 
design, they may then select the design profession in which they are most 
interested. When this selection has been made the unity of the school 
and frequent collaboration prevent the unnatural isolation of any pro- 
fessional group. 

Training in drawing, painting, sculpture, and other visual arts is con- 
ducted by specialists within the staff of the School of Design; the es- 
sential knowledge of techniques and materials is taught by this faculty 
and other departments of the college; and the past and present of the 
professions are taught by this faculty. These ingredients of design train- 
ing are assimilated through their application in the design courses. 
Thus the student is required to combine these studies increasingly as he 
advances through the course so that he may achieve that comprehensive 
combination which is a necessity in the designer. Much of the student's 
work will be done in laboratory courses since design is a matter of the 
application of knowledge rather than its mere accumulation. From his 
first day in class to his last the student is asked to design and he is 
counseled so that he may become a responsible professional in the broad- 
est sense. 



________ ______ —CURRICULA 

The School of Design offers professional instruction to the undergrad- 
uate in Architecture and Landscape Architecture. A graduate program 
in both fields is being projected for the near future. 

A third Department, of Products Design, is being planned which will 
concern itself with problems of form and aesthetics as related to the 
design and fabrication of industrial protiucts. The new department will 
actively collaborate with a number of existing departments on the 
campus which are now engaged in management and production. 



________ ______ _ -DEGREES 

The five year curricula offer courses of study leading to the Bachelor 
of Architecture and the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture. 



________ ______ _ FACILITIES 

In January, 195^, the School of Design moved to Brooks Hall on the 
College Campus. Brooks Hall is the former Hill Library, built in 1U28 
and vacated in 1954 aftei- a new million and a quarter <iollar library for 
the College was complete<l with State funds. The new Brooks Hall is a 
remodeling of 28,000 square feet of floor space and a new addition of 
20,000 square feet. All of the facilities of the School are now in modern, 
especially desiirned quarters under one roof. 

73 



DESIGN 



OPPORTUNITIES— — — — ______ ____ 

State law now requires the tiraduate architect to work not less than 
three years in the offices of registered architects and to pass the four day 
written examination jriven by the State Board of Architectural Exami- 
nation and Registration before he is ready to commence his own practice. 
The gi'eat national boom in building construction since World War II 
has brought a tremendous volume of work into the offices of the south 
offering many attractive positions for the architectural graduate. The 
architectural graduate is also a_ualified for positions in certain branches 
of engineering, building research and teaching. 

Usually the landscape architect practices in one of two ways. He may 
be a private piactitioner with an office serving clients who come to him 
for help and advice in the same manner as a lawyer, engineer or archi- 
tect; or he may be an employee of a private or public organization. 
Organizations commonly employing landscape architects include other 
practicing landscape architects, city planners, engineers, architects; 
national, state and municipal recreation agencies; parkway and highway 
departments housing agencies, planning commissions, conservation de- 
partments, and universities. Private concerns such as plant nurseries, 
pri-vate estates, botanical and zoological gardens, or construction com- 
panies may also employ landscape architects. 

Testimony to the soundness of the course of study and program of 
North Carolina State College is reflected by two of the Department's 
recent graduates who have been awarded the Pi'ix de Rome in Landscape 
Architecture — a prize awarded annually to any graduate landscape archi- 
tect in the United States affoi-ding two years advance study in Europe 
and providing all expenses and residence at the Amei-ican Academy in 
Rome. 



ARCHITECTURE 



Professor WILLIAM L. Baumgarten 

Professor-Emeritus Ross Shumaker 

Visiting Professor HoRACio Caminos 

Associate Professors Joseph H. Cox, Cecil D. Elliott, Roy Gussovv, 

George Matsumoto, Duncan R. Stuart 
Msitiiig Associate Professor Stefan Buzas 

Assistant Professors JAMES E. ADAMS, ENRIQUE MONTENEGRO 
Visiti)ig Assista"t Professor GUISEPPI GUARNIERI 
Instructors Julian Beinart, George L. Bireline, Jr., Charles M. 

Sappenfield, Herbert B. Simon 
Lihrar'a)! MRS. JAMES A. Lyons 

CURRICULUM ____ ______ ____ 



Credit.s 



ARC 101, 102 Introduction to .Vrchitecture 

I)N 101. 102 Design I, II 

I)N 111. 112 Descriptive Drawing I. II 

ENG 111. 112 Composition 

.MA 101. 102 F'^irst Year Mathematics for Engineers 

MS 101, 102 .Military Science I 

or or 

AS 121. 122 Air Science I 

PE 101. 102 F'hvsical Education 



9 


2 


.3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


4 


2 


2 


1 


1 



17 



74 



I)N 


201. 


202 


i)N 


211, 


212 


KM 


311 




MA 


201 




I'V 


211, 


212 


SS 


.iOl, 


302 


MS 


201. 


202 


AS 


221, 


222 


VK 


201, 


202 



4 


5 


2 


2 





3 


1 


(1 


4 


t 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



DESIGN 



DtsiK'ti III. IV 
Dfsrriptivt' Drawinjj III. I\ 
Meihaniis I (Statics) 
Calculus I 
(leneral I'h>sics 
Cnntt'mporary Civilization 
.Military Science II 

or 
Air Science II 
Physical Kducation 

20 20 

Summer Requirement: Two \\ eeks on Regional Research I'roject. 

3 ARC 301, 302 Architectural Design I. II 
•* CE 338, 339 Structures I, II 

I)N 311, 312 Descriptive Drawing V, VI 
DN 331, 332 History of Design I, II 
KM 321 Strength of Materials I 

MK 377 Building Mechanics A 

Electives* 

20 20 

Summer Reciiiirement : Eight >> eeks on Approved ( onstruction or OtTice 
Project. 

4 ARC 401, 402 Architectural Design III. TV 
CE 435, 436 Structures III, IV 
DN 411, 412 Destriptive Drawing VII. \ III 
DN 422 Oflice Procedure I 
DN 531, 432 Historv of Design III, I\ 
ME 37S Building Mechanics 

Electives 

20 20 

5 ARC 501. 502 Architectural Design V. VI 6 6 
•* CE 497. 498 Engineering Consultation 2 2 

DN ."II. 512 Descriptive Drawing I\, X 2 2 

DN 521 Office Procedure II 2 

DN 531 History of Design V 3 

Philosophy of Design 1. II 2 2 

Electives''' 3 9 

20 21 



6 


(i 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 








3 


3 


3 



8 


8 


3 


4 


2 


2 




2 


3 


3 


3 





3 


3 



'The curriculum in Arc-hiti-ctiiial KnKineerinjf wan discontinuetl in September. Wis. 

' Six credits cif elective in the .=)th year will be re<iuire<l in American. KuKlish. or World 
Literature, the remaining si.\ in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Advanced Military- 
may be selected as an elective in the »rd and -Ith year. 
Total Credits for the Bachelor of Architecture — 196. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Professor EDWIN G. TuiRl.dW 

Associate Professors .Joseph H. Cox. Roy {;issow, DUNCAN R. Stiart 

Visiting Associate Professor Lenis J. CLARKE 

Assistant Professor E.NRIQL'E MoNTENECRo 

Instructors George L. BIRELINE. Jr.. HERBERT B. SlMON 

75 



DESIGN 



CURRICULUM 



DN 101. 102 
DN 111. 112 
ENG 111. 11' 
MA 111, 112 
ME 103. 104 
MS 101, 102 

AS 201. 202 
PE 101, 102 



BO 101 
CE 201 
DN 201, 202 
DN 211. 212 
EM 311 
LA 212 
SS 301, 302 
MS 201, 202 

AS 221, 222 
PE 201. 202 



Design I. II 

Descriptive Drawing I. II 

Composition 

Algebra and Trigonometry 

Descriptive Geometry 

Military Science I 

or 
Air Science I 
Phvsical Education 



General Botany 
Surveving I 
Design III, IV 
Descriptive Drawing III. IV 
Mechanics I (Statics) 
Landscape Construction I 
Contemporary Civilization 
Military Science II 

or 
Air Science II 
Physical Education 



DN 311, 312 Descriptive Drawing V, VI 
DN 331, 332 History of Design I, II 
HRT201, 202 Woody Plants 
LA 301, 302 Landscape Design I, II 
LA 311, 312 Landscape Construction & Materials I, II 
Electives* 



Credits 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


7 


17 


3 





3 





4 


5 


2 


2 





3 




3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


8 


19 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


6 


4 


4 


3 


3 



21 
Summer Requirement: Two weeks on Regional Research Project 

A DN 411, 412 Descriptive Drawing VII, VIII 2 

DN 431, 432 History of Design III, IV 3 

HRT 212 Herbaceous Plants 

LA 401, 402 Landscape Design III, IV 6 

LA 421. 422 Planting Design 4 

Electives* 6 



21 



21 20 

Summer Requirement: Eight weeks Approved Professional Experience. 

DN 422. ,521 Office Procedure I. II 
DN .511. 512 Descriptive Drawing IX, X 
DN 531 Historv of Design V 

DN 541, 512 Philosophy of Design I, II 
LA 501, 502 Landscape Design V. VI 
Electives* 



2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


8 


9 


4 


6 



21 



21 



Six credits of elective will he reiiuired in American. F.nnlish, or World Literature, the 
remaininK six in Hunmanities and Social Science. Advanced Militar.v may be selected 
as an elective in the :iv<\ or 4th year. 
Total Credits for the Hachelor of Landscape Architecture — 196 



76 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

J. BRYANT KIRKLAND, DEAN 
T. E. BROWNE, DIRECTOR EMERITUS 



INTRODUCTORY 



The maximal social and economic lifvc'lopment of tiie citizenry of 
North Carolina is tiependcnt to a jjreat extent upon the contributions of 
its educational institutions. The current and anticipated increase in the 
population of secondary school ajre youth necessitates a greater number 
of competent teachers in the public schools of North Carolina, particu- 
larly in the areas of vocational agriculture, industrial arts, industrial 
education, mathematics, and science. 

The School of Education comprises the following departments: Agri- 
cultural Education, Industrial Arts, Industrial Education. Industrial and 
Rural Recreation, Mathematics and Science Education, Occupational 
Information and Guidance, and Psychology. 

The Department of Agricultural Education is the only one in this state 
that prepares teachers of vocational agriculture to conduct organized 
instructional programs of vocational agriculture for prospective and 
present farmers. 

If the youth of North Carolina, parti L-ularly those in the non-farm 
areas, are to become familiar with the increasingly available occupational 
opportunities which accompany an industrial expansion and are to be 
given the training needed for entrance into the industrial occupations of 
their choice, public schools will need to employ a larger number of compe- 
tent teachers of Industrial Arts and Industrial Education. 

The acute shortage of persons qualified to teach Mathematics and 
Science in the public schools and the demand for graduates with Mathe- 
matics and Science backgrounds in industrial positions have made employ- 
ment opportunities in these areas very good. 

Improved methods in industry and the use of mechanized equipment on 
farms have resulted in more leisure time on the part of urban and rural 
workers and their families. The Department of Industrial and Rural 
Recreation contributes much to a better use of this leisure time by train- 
ing recreational leaders for the municipalities, industries, and rural areas 
of the state. 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance provides 
the public schools with teachers and vocational counselors who render 
valuable assistance to high school youth in making wise vocational choices. 
The Department of Psychology serves the various industries in the state 
by helping to improve their personnel selection programs and by conduct- 
ing research designed to ascertain what factors influence efficiency of 
industrial employees. 

The primary purpose of the Departments of Agricultural Education, 
Industrial Arts, Industrial Education, and Mathematics and Science Edu- 
cation is that of preparing students to become teachers in North Caro- 
lina's public schools. Satisfactory completion of the curriculum require- 
ments in any of these departments qualifies a graduate to receive an A 
Grade certificate to teach in his cho.scn subject matter area. 

77 



EDUCATION 

The curriculum in Industrial and Rural Recreation is desig;ned primarily 
to prepare students to become leaders of recreation programs in industry, 
institutions, and rural areas. 

The Department of Psychology and Occupational Information and Guid- 
ance offer service courses for undergjraduate students in the School of 
Education and other schools. These departments are primarily concerned, 
however, with offering professional instruction at the graduate level for 
Industrial Psychologists and Vocational Counselors. 

CURRICULAR OFFERINGS AND DEGREES __ — — — — — — 

Upon the satisfactory completion of one of the undergraduate curricula 
in the School of Education, a student is eligible to receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science with the name of his area of specialization: in 
Agricultural Education, Industrial Arts, Industrial Education, Industrial 
and Rural Recreation, Mathematics Education and Science Education. 

The Master of Agricultural Education, Industrial Arts Education, In- 
dustrial Education, and Occupational Information and Guidance is 
awarded to students in Education who meet the general requirements 
of the Graduate School and the specific requirements of the respective 
departments in which graduate work is taken. Graduate students enrolled 
in any of the above departments and Psychology who wish to engage 
in more concentrated study in their major field of interest and to con- 
duct research in this field may earn a research degree — Master of Science 
— in their respective department of specialization. The specific require- 
ments for undergraduate and graduate degrees are included in the de- 
partmental write-ups on pages . 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



Professor C. C. SCARBOROUGH, Head of the Dcpartiiwiit 
Professor Emeritus LEON E. CooK 

Professors L. O. Armstrong, J. K. Coggin, J. B. Kirkland 
Associate Professors F. A. Nylund, G. B. James 

OBJECTIVES— _ — _— ______ ____ 

The Department of Agricultural Education is responsible for supplying 
the public schools with an adequate number of competent teachers of 
vocational agricailture. Since most of his work as a teacher of vocational 
agriculture will be done with farm people, the student planning to teach 
should have lived on the farm. If he is not farm-reared, he will be ex- 
pected to secive farm experience before he graduates. Enrollment in 
vocational agriculture in high school with a good supervised farming pro- 
gram contributes to his pi-eparation for teaching vocational agriculture. 

The Agi'icultural Education department provides professional training 
for students who plan to teach vocational agriculture in high schools. 
Some graduates, however, go into other work in agriculture, and others 
do giaduate work in agricultural education. 

OPPORTUNITIES— __— ______ ____ 

There is a great need for teachers of vocational agriculture in North 
Carolina, with every indication that the demand will be greater in the 
future. At present, there are 48() white teachers of vocational agriculture 
in 99 counties in the state. The program is one of the largest in the 
United States. 

GRADUATE STUDY ___ ______ ____ 

The department provides opportunities for fully qualified students to 
do graduate work in Agricultural Education. Graduate students in this 

78 



EDUCATION 



field may qualify for eithtT tlio Master of Science decree or for the de^^'ce 
of Master of Agricultural Education. Detailed information concerning 
these decrees may be secured from the Department of Atrricultural Edu- 
cation or from the Dean of the CJraduate School. 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Credits 



Mi 101 Ajrriculture and World Affairs 

A(JK 201 Farm Shop Woodwork 

.\GK 202 Farm Shop Metahvork 

KD 101 Introduction to Aj^ricultural Education 

ED 102 Objectives in Nocational Ajrriculture 

EN (J 111, 112 Composition 

.M.\ 111 Algebra and Trijionometry 

P() 201 Chicken and Turkey Production 

Z() 101 (Jeneral Zoology 

MS 101, 102 Military Science I or 

or 

AS 121, 122 Air Science I 

VE 101. 102 Physical Education 



3 





2 








2 


1 








1 


3 


3 


4 








4 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



16 Ifi 



A(JE 211 Farm Power and Machinery 1 3 

F{() 101, 102 (;eneral Hotany 3 3 

(H 101 General Inorganic ("hemistry 4 

CH 203 General and Orjjanic Chemistry 4 

EC 201 Economics 3 

ED 201 FF.\ in Vocational .Agriculture 1 

REC 2")1 Social Recreation 3 
MS 201, 202 .Military Science II or 

or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 2 2 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 1 1 

History Elective 3 

.Vuriculture Elective 5 

19 19 



AGC 212 Economics of .\uriculture 

AGC 303 Farm Management I 

ED 313 Or^anizinu Pro>;:rams of .\^'ricul(ure 

EI) 314 Secondary Education 

I'Y 211 (Jeneral Physics 

PSY 301 Educational Psycholouy 

PSV 476 Psych<doKy of Adolescense 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

SOI 200 Soils 

Auricuitural Enjjineerin^ Elective 

Fnnlish Elective 

Free Elcclives 



3 








3 





3 





2 


4 





3 








2 


3 





4 








3 





3 


3 


3 



20 19 

79 



EDUCATION 



AGK 101 Farm Shop Organization and Management 

EU 411 Student Teaching in Agriculture 

ED 412 Teaching Adults 

ED 413 Teaching Materials 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance 

ED 430 Senior Seminar 

RS 321 Introduction to Social Research 

Biological Science F^ective 

Agriculture Elective 

English Elective 

Political Science Elective 

Free Ellectives'-' 



3 





6 





2 





2 








2 





1 


2 







3 





6 





3 





3 


3 


3 



21 



Summer Practice (2 weeks t is required prior to senior year. 
* Students taking advanced ROTC will take 18 hours fall semester : other students will 
get the 3-hour free elective some other semester. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



Professor Ivan Hostetler, Head of the Department 
Associate Professor Marshall L. Schmidt 
Assistant Professor Robert T. Troxler 

OBJECTIVES— — — __ _____ 



Industrial Arts comprises that area of education which concerns itself 
with materials, processes, and products of industry. It is concerned with 
a study of changes made in materials to make them more useful and with 
the problems related to these changes. The processes involved in changing 
these materials to useful products constitute the laboratory work in an 
Industrial Arts Program. 

Students, therefore, should have an active interest in industrial ma- 
terials, processes, produc-ts and problems in such areas as woods, metals, 
electricity, ceramics, graphic arts and plastics. They should enjoy work- 
ing with hand and machine tools. A wide range of technical skills, prac- 
tical experience and a knowledge of labor and labor problems is very 
important. 

The Department of Industrial Arts at North Carolina State College 
performs two functions: First, it prepares teachers and supervisors of 
industrial arts for secondary schools, and, second, it provides practical 
training for students interested in technical jobs in industry, such as 
industrial work in production, personnel, sales, estimating, job training 
and safety. 

OPPORTUNITIES— ___ ______ ____ 

The opportunities for employment as industrial arts teachers in North 
Carolina are greater than ever before. Less than one-fourth of the public 
schools have teachers of industrial aits. The demand for industrial em- 
ployment is also very great. 

GRADUATE STUDY ___ ______ ____ 

Opportunities are provided for students fully qualified to do graduate 
work leading to the degree of Master of Industrial Arts Education or 
Master of Science in Industrial Arts Education. For additional informa- 
tios regarding graduate study, the Graduate School Catalog should be 
consulted. 

80 



EDUCATION 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Credits 



KN(; 111. 11 


III 2.-) 2 




1 A 100 




I A 103. 


101 


I A 10« 




lA 107 




MA 111 




MA 122 




MS 101, 


102 


(ir 




AS 121, 


122 


PE 101. 


102 



112 ('om|)(»siti()n 

The Initod States Siiue lS«r> 
Introduction to Industrial Art^ 
Industrial Arts I)ra«inji 
Laboratory of Industries 
(leneral WOodwork 
Alt'frbra and 'rriuonometry 
Mathematics «»f Finance 
Military Science I 

or 
Air Science I 
Physical Kducation 



('II ICl (ieneral Inorganic Chemistry 

EC 201 Economics 

ENG 231 Hasic Speakinjr Skills 

I A 108 Genera! Woodwork 

lA 205 Industrial Arts Design 

I A 206, 207 General Metalwork 

PS 201 The American Governmental System 

PY 211 General Physics 

SOC 202 Man and Society 

MS 201. 202 Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221. 222 Air Science II 

PE 201. 202 Physical Education 



EI) 308 Visual Aids 

EI) 314 Secondary Education 

EI) 345 Field Work in Secondary Education 

EI) 422 Methods of Teachinji Industrial Subjects 

lA 306 Graphic Arts 

I A 307 General Electricity 

I A 308 Industrial Arts Electronics 

lA 320 Tools and Materials 

PSY 301 Education Psychology 

PSY 176 Psychology of Adolescence 

Enjjlish Elective 

Elect ives 



Fl) 120 Principles of Guidance 

El) 111 Student Toachinir in Industrial Subjects 

EI) 482 Curriculum Problems in Industrial Arts 

EI) 483 Instructional Aids and Devices 

EI) 521 Occupational Information 

I A 160 (ieneral Shop 

I A IHI School Shop Planning and K(|uipnu-nt 

Selection 

Elect ives 



3 


3 





3 


1 





3 


3 


3 








3 


4 








1 


2 


2 


1 


1 



17 19 



4 








3 


3 





3 








2 


3 


3 


3 








4 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



19 18 






2 


2 








2 





3 


3 





3 








3 


2 





3 








2 


3 





3 


6 



19 18 






2 


6 





2 





2 








2 


3 








3 


6 


12 



19 19 

81 



EDUCATION 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS — TECHNICAL OPTION _ _ _ 
F"reshman and Sophomore Years Same as in Industrial Arts Education 

Credits 



EC 202 Economics 

lA 307 General Electricity 

lA 308 Industrial Arts Electronics 

lA 321 Metahvork TechnoloKy 

IE 310 Industrial Safety 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 

I*SV 200 Introduction to Psychology 

PSV 337 Industrial Psychology I 

SOC 301 Human Hehavior 



Elect ives 



20 



EC 425 Industrial Management 

EC 426 Personnel Management 

EC 431 Labor Problems 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 

ED 524 Occupational Information 

lA 320 Tools and Materials 

lA 580 Modern Industries 

IE 408 Production Control 

IE 430 Job Evaluation and Wage 
Elect ives 



Administration 



3 








3 


2 





2 








2 


2 








2 


3 








A 


6 


9 



19 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



OBJECTIVES— — — — — ______ ____ 

The Department of Industrial Education is the only one in the state 
that prepares teachers of Industrial Education for the public schools. 
The main goal is to provide public schools with adequately trained per- 
sonnel who can, in turn, help to develop a vitally needed reservoir of 
skilled workers and technical personnel to man established industries as 
well as prepare for new industries. The curriculum is planned to provide 
students with broad cultural and pi'ofessional backgrounds to parallel 
occupational experience. 

Candidates for a degree must have had at least two years of success- 
ful trade e.xperience in the trade they wish to teach. The student who has 
not had this trade expeiicnce when he enters must fulfill the requirement 
before graduation either by working part of the school year or by com- 
pleting the work experience after finishing the required resident courses. 

OPPORTUNITIES— ___ ______ ____ 

The student who complete this curriculum will be prepared to teach in 
the all-day trade schools, area vocational schools, and the part-time, or 
evening vocational classes. Graduates have no difficulty in obtaining 
employment as Industrial Education teachers. 

GRADUATE STUDY ___ ______ ____ 

General and specialized professional courses are available to qualified 
students who wish to pursue graduate study as Industrial Education 
teachers, supervisors or coordinators of diversified occupatiins. The com- 



82 



EDUCATION 



pletion of the Master of Industrial E.lucation or Master ofScienc-e decree 
in Industrial Education will also qualify one for a Graduate Certificate in 
North Carolina. 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION — — — — — — — 

A minimum of 1 18 semester credits required for graduation 

Credits 
1 KI) 100 Introduction to Industrial Education 2 

' ENG 111. 112 Composition J d 

HI 252 The Inited States Since 186;) W » 

lA 103. 101 Industrial Arts Drawins 
MA 111 Algebra and TriKonometry 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 

MS 101. 102 Military Science I 

or or 

AS 121. 122 Air Science I ^ ^ 

TE 101. 102 Physical Education ]^ ^ 

Elect ives 



3 3 

4 
4 

2 2 



17 li> 



CH 101 (;eneral InorKanic Chemistry 4 

EC 201 Economics ® ^ 

ENG 231 Hasic Speaking Skills » " 

I>S 201 American Governmental System 3 

|>Y 211 (;eneral Physics ® * 

SOC 202 Man and Society » 

SOC 301 Human Hehavior " * 

MS 201. 202 Military Science II 

or or » „ 

AS 221. 222 Air Science II i i 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 1 J 

Elect ives ^ " 

19 19 



EC 202 Economics 

KC 312 Accounting for Engineers 

EI) 308 Visual Aids 

EI) 314 Secondary Education 

I-'I) 345 Field ^^ ork in Secondary Education 

PI) 422 Methods of leaching Industrial Subject^ 

IK 310 Industrial Safety 

PSV 301 Educational Psychology 

PSY 476 Ps>chology of Adolescense 

REC 333 First Aid and Safety 

English Elective 

Elect ives 



3 








3 





2 


2 








ty 





3 


2 





3 








2 


2 








3 


7 


3 



19 18 



83 



EDUCATION 



EI) 120 Principles of Guidance 

ED 440 N'ocational Education 

ED 444 Student Teachinjr in Industrial Subjects 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys 

ED 483 Instructional Aids and Devices 

ED 524 Occupational Information 

El) 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction 

EI) 527 Philosophy of Industrial Education 

PSY 337 Industrial I'sychology 
Electives ' 






2 


2 





6 








2 


2 








2 


2 








2 





3 


6 


8 



1^» 



* Electives to be selected with aid of advisor to meet special needs of individual students. 



INDUSTRIAL AND RURAL RECREATION 



Professor Thomas I. Hines, Head of Department 

Associate Professor Latham L. Miller 

Assistant Professors CHARLES C. Stott, Albert Crawford 

OBJECTIVES— — — — — ______ ____ 

The Department of Industrial and Rural Recreation provides training 
for students who plan to become recreation leaders in industry, munici- 
palities, institutions and rural communities. The recreation profession 
recognizes the importance of leaders who possess the competence needed 
to plan and supervise effective recreation programs. Competent leader- 
ship is the major factor affecting the scope, intensity and success of a 
program of organized recreation. A curriculum in Park Administration 
is also offered for students who plan to engage in the administration 
of local, county or state parks. 

All students pursue the same program for the first two years after 
which they declare an option (Industrial, Rural, Institutional or Park 
Administration) and take courses designed to meet the needs in their 
respective area of specialization. 

OPPORTUNITIES— — — — ______ ____ 

The demand for properly trained recreation leadership has increased 
rapidly in recent years. The number of graduates has not been sufficient 
to meet the demand for recreation leaders. 

CURRICULUM OF INDUSTRIAL AND RURAL RECREATION— _ _ _ 

A minimum of 149 semester credits required for graduation. 

1 ENG 111, 112 Composition 

' HI 252 U. S. History Since 1865 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

PS 201 American Governmental System 

REC 152 Introduction to Recreation 

REC 153 Aquatic Sports 

SOC 202 Man and Society 

ZO 101. 102 General Zoology 

MS 101. 102 Military Science I 
or or 

AS 121, 122* Air Science I 

PE 101. 102 Physical Education* 



3 


3 


3 





4 








3 


3 








2 





3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



19 17 



84 



EDUCATION 



OPTION IN INDUSTRIAL RECREATION 



Credits 



PX" 201. 202 (Jencral Kronomics 

liasic Speakinji Skills 

Principles of Ne>\s and Article Writing 
I'layuround Leadership 
Social Recreation I 
Social Recreation II 
Principles of Physical Education 
Human Hehavior 
Human Anatomy 
Human I'hysiology 
202 Military Science II 

or 
122 ' Air Science II 
PE 201. 202 Physical p:ducation* 



KN(; 2ol 

KNt; 2ir. 

HFC 201 

RKv' 2:.l 

RKl" 2.>2 

REC 253 

sor 301 

ZO 212 
ZO 213 

MS 201. :; 

or 
AS 121 



3 


3 


3 








3 


2 





3 








3 


3 








3 


3 








3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



20 



EC 425 Industrial Management 

EC 426 Personnel Management 

ED 308 Visual Aids 

I A 314 Recreational Arts and Crafts 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 

or or 

EC 312 Accounting for Engineers 

PSY 200 Intrt)duction to Psychology 

PSY 302 Psychology of Personality and Adjustment 

REC 333 First Aid and Safety 

REC 351 Individual Sports in Recreation 

REC 352 Team Sports in Receration 

REC 353 (amp Organization and Leadership 

REC 351 Personal and ( Ommunity Hygiene 
Elect ives 



19 



21 



A EC 431 

^ PSY 337 
REC 401 



REC 451 
REC 152 
REC 170 
REC 171 
REC J72 
SOC 302 
SOC 501 



Labor Problems 

Industrial Psychology I 

Principles and Practices of 

Industrial Recreation 

Facilities and KquipmenI 

Recreation Administration 

Supervised Practice 

Organizing The Recreation Program 

Observation and Field Experience 

Public Relati«»ns and .Modern .Society 

Leadership 

Elect ives 



2 





3 





2 





3 








3 





6 





•> 





2 


3 





3 





3 


3 



19 



Ifi 



85 



EDUCATION 



OPTION IN RURAL RECREATION 



EC 201, 202 General Economics 

ENG 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

ENG 215 Principles of News and Article Writing 

REC 201 IMayground Leadership 

REC 251 Social Recreation I 

REC 252 Social Recreation II 

REC 253 Principles of Physical Education 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

ZO 212 Human Anatomy 

ZO 213 Human Physiology 

MS 201, 202 .Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, 222= Air Science II 

PE 201. 202 Physical Education* 



Credits 



3 


3 


3 








3 


2 





3 








3 


3 








3 


3 








3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



20 



18 



ED 308 Visual Aids 

I A 314 Recreational Arts and Crafts 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 

or or 

EC 312 Accounting for Engineers 

PS 202 County and Municipal Government 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

PSY 476 Psvchologv of Adolescence 

REC 333 First Aid and Safety 

REC 351 Individual Sports in Recreation 

REC 352 Team Sports in Recreation 

REC 353 Camp Organization and Leadership 

REC 354 Personal and Community Hygiene 

ZO 312 Principles of Game Management 
Eleclives 



2 








2 





4 





3 


3 








2 


2 





3 








3 





3 


3 





3 





3 


4 



19 



21 



El) 420 Principles of Guidance 

REC 301 Organization and Administration of 

Physical Education 
REC 315 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 

REC 325 Activities for the Handicapped Individual 

REC 451 Facilities and Equipment 

REC 452 Recreation Administration 

REC 470 Supervised Practice 

REC 471 Organizing the Recreation Program 

REC 472 Observation and Field Experience 

SOC 411 Community Relationships 

Elect ives 



2 





2 





2 





3 








3 





6 





2 





2 


3 





5 


3 



19 



16 



86 



3 


3 


3 





() 


3 


2 





3 








3 


3 








3 


3 








3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



EDUCATION 

______ —OPTION IN INSTITUTIONAL RECREATION 

Credits 

KC 201. 202 (ieneral Economics 

KN(J 231 Basic Speakinj; Skills 

ENG 215 Principles (»f News and Article Writing 

HEC 201 IMaytrround Leadership 

REC 251 Social Recreation I 

REC 252 Social Recreation II 

REC 253 Principles of Physical Kdiication 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

ZO 212 Human Anatomy 

ZO 213 Human Physiolofjy 

MS 201. 202 Military Science 11 

or or 

AS 221. 222 Air Science II 

PE 201. 202 Physical Education 

20 18 



ED 308 Visual Aids 

lA 311 Recreational Arts and Crafts 

MA 122 Mathematics of Einance 

or or 

EC 312 Accounting for Enjjineers 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 

PSV 302 Psvcholo^v of Personality and Adjustment 

REC 333 First Aid and Safety 

REC 351 Individual Sports in Recreation 

REC 352 Team Sports in Recreation 

REC 353 Camp Orfjanization and Leadership 

REC 354 Personal and Community Hyjriene 

SOC 302 Public Relations and Modern Society 

SOC 301 Contemporary Family Life 
Elect ives 



2 








2 





I 


3 








3 


2 





3 








3 





3 


3 








3 


3 





3 


3 



H> 



PSY 530 Abnormal Psychology 

REC 301 Organization and Administration of 

Ph.\sical Education 
REC 325 Activities for the Handicapped Individual 

RF^C 151 Facilities and ICquipment 

REC 152 Rei-reation Administration 

REC 170 Supervised Practice 

RFX' 471 ()rm:ni/.inij the Recreation Program 

UFA' 472 Observation and Field Experience 

SOC 306 Delinquemy and Crime 

SOC 412 Introduction to Social \\(»rk 

Elect ives 



2 





2 





3 








3 





8 





2 





2 


3 





3 





3 


3 



1 H It; 



87 



EDUCATION 



OPTION IN PARK ADMINISTRATION - 



BO 101, 102 General Botany 

EC 201. 202 General Kconomics 

ENG 231, 215 Basic Speaking Skills; 

Principles of News and Article Writing 

PS 202 County and Municipal Government 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 

REC 207 History and Principles of Park 

Administration 

REC 251 Social Recreation I 

REC 333 First Aid and Safety 

ZO 252 Ornithology 

MS 201, 202 Military Science II 

or Or 

AS 221, 222* Air Science II 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education* 



Credits 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 





3 





3 


2 





3 





2 








3 



1 

19 



1 
21 



AGE 201, 202 Farm Shop Wood W^ork; 
Farm Shop Metal Work 

BO 211, 203 Dendrology; Introduction to 
Systematic Botany 
Mathematics of Finance 



MA 122 

or 
EC 312 
MIG 120 
LA 300 
PSY 302 
REC 351 
REC 352 
ZO 321 



Accounting for Engineers 

Physical Geology 

Appreciation of Park Design 

Psychology of Personality and Adjustment 

Individual Sports in Recreation 

Team Sports in Receration 

Wildlife and Natural Resource Conservation 

Electives 



2 


2 


2 


3 





4 





3 


3 





3 





3 








3 





3 


3 


3 



16 



21 



AGE 341 Farm Electrification and Utilities 

BO 441 Plant Ecology 

EC 426 Personnel Management 

REC 353 Camp Organization and Leadership 

REC 354 Personal and Community Hygiene 

REC 411, 412 Park Maintenance and Operation 
REC 451 Facilities and Equipment 

REC 452 Recreation Administration 

REC 471 Organizing the Recreation Program 

ZO 522 Animal Ecology 

Electives 



3 





3 








3 


3 





3 





2 


2 





3 


3 








2 





3 


3 


3 



20 



16 



students excused from Military or Air Science and or Physical Education will schedule 
e(|uivalent ci-edits in courses from Ihe ft)llo\vinK departments : Kconomics. Knglish, 
History am! Political Science. Modern Lanituasres, Philosophy and ReliKion. Psychologry, 
Rural Socioloify. Social Studies, and Sociolotty 

Kield Work : Evidence of at least four months of satisfactory employment in the i)ractice 
of his i)ri)fe88ion is retiuired from each candidate for Kraduation. Such work may in- 
clude si.x week's work in connection with the ROTC summer training propram. 



88 



EDUCATION 



— — — — MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

________ ______ ^ OBJECTIVES 

The Departnu'nt o fMatliematics and Science Education offers curricula 
for those students who wish to heconie teachers of Mathematics or 
Science. Each curriculum provides for a well rounded professional prep- 
aration. These is sufficient flexibility in each curriculum to enable the 
student to meet certification requirements in both subject matter areas 
by proper selection of elective courses. This flexibility also enables the 
student to specialize in one subject matter area thus opening; up job 
opportunities in related fields requirinj; a substantial back^iound in 
Mathematics and Science such as. research teams in industry, govern- 
ment research projects involvin^r rockets, jruided missiles, computers or 
pure research. 

___ — — — — — ______ OPPORTUNITIES 

The acute shortajie of Mathematics and Science teachers in the secon- 
dary schools provides excellent employment opportunities for more 
graduates in this department. Attractive job opportunities are also 
available for industrial employment. The rapid technological and scien- 
tific developments durinj? the past few years has accentuated the im- 
portance of mathematics and science. Future developments will depend 
upon the accomplishments of persons who have received adequate train- 
ing: in these areas. 



____ — — —CURRICULUM IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

A minimum of 144 credits required for graduation 



Credits 



("H 101 General Inorganic Chemistry 

CH lO.S (ieneral and (Qualitative Chemistry 

EN(; 111,112 Composition 

HI 2.")2 The Inited States since ISti.l 

MA 101. 102 First Year .Mathematics for Engineers 

PS 201 The American (iovernmental System 

MS 101. 102 Military Science I 

or or 

AS 121. 122 Air Science 

I*E 101. 102 rh>sical Education 



ED 20.3 Intfdduction t<» Teaching 

I.\ 20.3 Industrial Arts Drawing 

MA 201. 202 Calculus I. II 

PY 211. 212 General I'hysics 

SOC 202 Man and Society 

MS 201. 202 Military Science II 

or "r 

AS 221. 222 Air Science II 

PE 201. 202 Physical Educati«m 
Elect ives 



J 








J 


;} 


:j 


.3 




1 





.3 


2 


2 


\ 


1 



18 



2 
:\ 
1 




1 


J 




1 
.3 


2 

1 
.3 


2 

1 


9 


19 




89 



EDUCATION 



Credits 



< 1] 201 Surveyinji or 

I»Y 223 Astronomy 

KC 201. 202 Kconomics 

KD 308 Visual Aids 

EI) 314 Secondary (Education 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 

rSY 304 f:ducational I'sycholoKy 

English Electives* 

Electives"' 



ED 420 Principles of Guidance 

ED 470 Methods of Teaching Mathematics 

ED 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics** 

MA 533 Histotj- of Mathematics 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescence 

Elect ives* 






3 


3 


3 





2 





2 


4 





3 





3 


3 


5 


6 



19 






2 


3 














3 


2 





3 


11 



18 16 



* A minimum of 6 semester hour electives in mathematics and 4 semester hours in 
mathematics and science. All electives must be selected with approval of advised. 
** During the fall semestei of the Senior year 12 weeks will be devoted to full-time off- 
campus work at an approved Student Teaching Center and approximately 6 weeks 
to concentrated courses. 



CURRICULUM IN SCIENCE EDUCATION 



A minimum of 144 credits required for graduation 



1 



BO 101, 102 General Botany 

ENG 111, 112 Composition 

HI 252 The United States since 1865 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 

MIG 120 Mineral Industries Geology 

MS 101, 102 Military Science I 

or or 

AS 121, 122 Air Science I 

PE 101, 102 Physical Education 



TH 101 General Inorganic Chemistry 

CH 103 General and Qualitative Chemistry 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching 

PS 201 The American Governmental System 

SOC 202 Man and Society 

ZO 101, 102 General Zoology 

ZO 213 Human Physiologv 

MS 201, 202 Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 
Electives-' 



3 


3 


3 


3 


3 





4 








4 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 



16 16 



4 








1 


2 





3 








3 


3 


3 





3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


4 


3 



19 19 



90 



EDUCATION 

Credits 
CM "'03 (JentTal and Oruanic Chemistrv 

EC 201. 202 Ktonomics 
ED 308 Visual Aids 

EI) 341 Secondary Kduiation 

ENT 312 Kconomif Kntomolojjy 

PSY 304 Kducational I'svchology 

I'V 211. 212 General rhjsics 
Klectives ' 

19 !9 

HO 412 (Jeneral Hatteriolojjy Q 4 

EI) 420 Principles of (luidance 2 

El) J"i> Methods of Teachinp Science 3 

EI) 478 Student Teaching in Science''* 10 

I'S\ 476 I'sycholojjy of Adolescence 2 

Knjrlish Elective 3 

Elect ives 3 9 

IS IS 



4 





3 


3 





2 


2 








3 





3 


4 


4 


3 


1 



• All electives to be selected with approval of adviser. 
•• During the fall term of the Senior year. 12 weeks will be devoted to full-time ofT- 
campus work at an approved Student Teaching Center and approximately 6 weeks to 
concentrated coui-ses on the campus. 



— — -OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 

Professor Roy N. A.\DERS(t.\. Hmd of the Departmvnt 
Assistant Professor Eli.as L. TdLBERT 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — _ OBJECTIVES 

Special facilities are provided in the School of Education for mature 
students and individuals who have had teaching: or personnel experience 
and who hold a Bachelor's deRree to enroll for courses leading to a 
Master's degree in Occupational Information and Guidance, or a Master 
of Science degree. The offerings of the Department of Occupational I-i 
formation and Guidance permit graduate students in subject-matter 
fields to select appropriate courses which will enable them to provide 
guidance and counseling foi- their students as well as exert influence in 
promoting a school-wide guidance program. 

A special program in rehabilitation counseling has been made possible 
by a Grant from the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare. 

In addition to the graduate program, the Department provides instruc- 
tion in guidance for undergraduate students in the School of Education. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduate work in Occupational Information and Guidanct gives prep- 
aration for such positions as counselor in secondary schools, colleges, or 
community agencies; school guidance directors; employment counselor; 
placement worker; business or industrial personnel "worker; and for 
personnel work in the State or Federal Government. Administrators, 
supervisors, directors of instruction, and others who wish to prepare 
themselves for positions of leadership in guidance work may also profit 
from this program. 

91 



EDUCATION 



The Federal-State Rehabilitation program is expanding and there is 
a definite demand for rehabilitation counselors today. This demand is 
expected to increase in the near future. 

GRADUATE STUDY ___ ______ ____ 

The ^Master's program includes a core of Guidance courses as follows: 
Ed. 524, Occupational Information; Ed. 631, Education and Vocational 
Guidance; Ed. 63o, Techniques in Guidance and Personnel; Ed. 641, Field 
Work; and Ed. 651, Research. Opportunity for field work is available 
in secondary schools, colleges, clinics, employment offices, and other 
agencies, according to the student's interest. Special courses are provided 
for rehabilitation counselors. Courses in Psychology, Sociology, Eco- 
nomics, and Education are selected to round out the program. For those 
interested in public school guidance work, the program also meets the 
requirements for the Counselors Certificate issued by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, as well as similar certificates in many other 
states. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Howard G. Miller, Head of the Department 

Professor KEY L. Barkley, Acting Head of the Department 

Visiting Professor WILLIAM McGehee 

Associate Professors Harold M. C'orter, J. Clyde Johnson 

Assistant Professors Charles R. Kelly, Michael Caffey, Paul J. Rust 

Part-time Instructor Marjorie Davidson 

Understanding himself, his neighbor, his co-worker, and members of 
his family has become a requirement of modern education for man. The 
emphasis upon the study of man is becoming stronger year by year as 
we gain further understanding of the importance of human factors in 
the successful placement of workers, in the maintenance of morale, in 
promoting safety in industry, in achieving efficiency in school work, and 
in making a healthy, happy and effective adjustment to the everyday 
world. 

OBJECTIVES— — — — _ ______ ____ 

In general, the courses in Psychology are designed to promote a broad 
understanding of man in relation to his environment or to cultivate th(> 
skills which may be useful in dealing with human beings in social, edu- 
cational, industrial, or other practical situations. 

The Department of Psychology, because of its intimate connection with 
teacher education programs, is located in the School of Education. The 
Department, however, offers courses of interest to students in all the 
professional schools. 

The primary objectives of the Department are: to provide students 
with a broad and general understanding of human development, behavior 
and adjustment; to provide students in the various technical departments 
with the specialized instruction whch will be of practical value to them; 
to give instruction in the areas of child development, motivation, learn- 
ing, social development and efficiency of study to students who are pre- 
paring to be teachers; to provide comprehensive training in industrial 
psychology and allied areas to students at the graduate level. 

The Department has certain facilities and arrangements for conducting 
its work which aid in the achievement of the stated objectives. 

92 



The Department of Psycholojry operates a Psychological Climc which 
provides individual testing and couseling services to students. Special 
problems in academic, personal, social, and vocational areas are handled. 
This service is closely integrated with the College counseling program. 
Tests of intelligence, aptitudes, personality, interests, and educational 
achievement are administered for individual diagnosis. Through the 
remedial reading division of the clinic, diagnostic and remedial help are 
provided students having redaing difficulties. 

In order to provide psychological services to industry, the Department 
recently established a Bureau which is equipped to conduct personnel 
evaluations, employee counseling, personnel training, aptitude testing, 
attitude surveys, personnel research, an dother psychological services. 

In addition* to the regular College budget, the Department has a 
psychology research budget which incorporates contract research studies 
sponsored' by industrial firms, private organizations, and government 

agencies. ui- u i 

An applied Experimental Psychology Laboratory has been established 
in the Department. Emphasis is placed upon the design of experiments 
to study practical human problems. The design of machines to fit the 
human "operato'r and the planning of work tasks in accordance with 
human capacities and limitations are major areas of concern in the 
Laboratory. 



________ ______ OPPORTUNITIES 

The Department does not offer an undergraduate degree in psychology, 
but a student may elect courses to the extent time is allowed by his 
regular curriculum". The Department does give a Master of Science Degree 
in Industrial Psychology. 

Upon completion of the Master's Degree in Industrial Psychology, a 
student may find employment in business or industry as a member of the 
personnel department, or become the o ccr in charge of training or 
safety. Some students find opportunities to become members of a research 
team' in government or private agencies. Opportunities are available also 
in teaching and research activities in colleges and universities. 

________ _____ GRADUATE STUDY 

The emphasis in graduate study in the Department in upon Industrial 
Psychology. A required basic set of courses is provided for all students 
who wish "to work toward a Master's Degree in Industrial Psychology. 
Supporting courses are offered in sufficient number for students to have 
some latitude in their emphasis on minor lines of study. The graduate 
courses in the Department are also available to graduate students major- 
ing in .Agricultural Education, Guidance. Industrial Arts, Industrie 
Education. Mathematics and Science Education, Textiles, Industrial 
Engineering, Rural Sociology, and Statistics. 

For general regulations regarding garduate study, the Graduate School 
Catalog should be consulted. 



93 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

JOHN HAROLD LAMPE, DEAN 

W. E. ADAMS, DIRECTOR OF INSTRUCTION 

ARTHUR CLAYTON MENIUS, JR., ASSISTANT TO THE DEAN 

INTRODUCTORY— _ _ _____ 



The impact of science and technoloj>y on civilization imposes upon all 
of us, and upon the engineer in particular, a new sense of responsibility. 
The scientist cannot guarantee that his contributions will always be used 
for noble purposes: he cannot answer for the misuse of scientific dis- 
coveries by dictators who would enslave the human race. But he can 
supply the knowledge and tools for building a better world and the de- 
fenses for its presei-vation. To be an engineer thus carries with it the 
responsibility and the obligation to use all newly discovered knowledge 
for the benefit of mankind. Discovery leads to discovery; knowledge opens 
the way to more knowledge, making possible further enlightenment and 
a new age of plenty. 

Engineering studies are of the utmost interest and importance to those 
young men and women who look to industry, engineering, or research for 
a career. These ambitions can well be furthered by the School of Engi- 
neering through its undergraduate or graduate programs, whereby stu- 
dents are offered technical instruction and leadership guidance by an 
experienced staff of qualified engineers and educators. 

The School of Engineering is organized into ten engineering depart- 
ments: Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial, Mechanical, Physics, Mathe- 
matics, Mineral Industries, Mechanics and Research. Undergraduate 
degree programs are offered in the first eight named departments, and 
all the teaching departments offer advanced studies leading to a Pro- 
fessional Degree or to the Master's degree. The Doctor of Philosophy pro- 
gram is offered in the Ceramic, Chemical, Electrical, and Physics De- 
partments. 

It is the policy of the School of Engineering to have all its curricula 
more than meet the standards of the Engineers' Council for Professional 
Development. It is the ambition of the School that its curricula and 
programs meet the needs of the people and industries of the state and 
region through effective instruction, competent research and develop- 
ment, and worthwhile scientific contributions to engineering knowledge. 

CURRICULA— __ — — ______ ____ 

The curricula representing the study program in all of the dei^artments 
are so arranged that the fiwshman year is common to all. Tlie.v contain 
broadening courses in the humanities while emphasizing the basic and 
fundamental engineering principles so essential to an engineering college 
program. Graduates of this program will not only be prepared for en- 
gineering responsibilities and positions of trust in industry, but will 
also have an appreciation and con.sciousness of human problems in com- 
munity and industrial life. Though an entering student is asked to desig- 
nate a field of interest, he can with ease and without any interruption 
change to some other field of study within the School of Engineering 
at the end of the freshman year. 

94 



ENGINEERING 

FOUR-YEAR BACHELOR'S CURRICULA AND PROFESSIONAL 
(FIFTH YEAR) STUDY 

The four-year projrram provides education and training to meet the 
needs of from eiulity to eighty-five per cent of the youiiu' men of North 
Carolina who will take their places in industry and industrial life in the 
fields of production, sales, application, planning, and the operaton of small 
industrial units. 

The fifth-year specialized traininji- leads to a professional decree 
(CE, CHE, ME, EE. etc.) in ceramic, chemical, civil, electrical, K^o- 
loijical, industrial, and mechanical enRineerinj!,-. The courses of study are 
especially designed to meet the needs of students desiring intensive 
specialization in a particular field or additional course work not ordinarily 
covered in the normal four-year under>>iaduate curicula. 

________ _____ GRADUATE STUDY 

The jii-aduate activites are patterned to provide advanced training and 
experience to young- men who have successfully completed a four-year 
profrram and w'ho have an interest and ability to continue their education. 
This elective proKram will train j-i'aduates for positions and activites in 
teaching", technical design, and research. The Engineering School offers 
two programs of graduate study. The first represents a year of full-time 
study and thesis work and leads to a degree of Master of Science in some 
field' of engineering. The second program leads to a Doctor's degree in 
some field of engineering and usually requires three years of full-time 
study, thesis work, and experimental activity. 

________ ______ — RESEARCH 

Research activities in the School of Engineering are based on a pro- 
gram correlated with graduate study in engineering. It is the purpose of 
this program not only to train future research workers, but also to carry 
out a program that assures both sound investigations of a fundamental 
nature in engineering sciences and work devoted to greater uses of th.- 
State's natural resources. Through publication, cooperative activity with 
industry and the operation of our own investigational projects, it is in- 
tended that the engineering research activities will be a part of and woik 
effectively with the industrial development of North Carolina. 

________ ______ — -DEGREES 

BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING 

The four-year curricula offer programs of study leading to a Bachelor's 
degree in Agricultural, Ceramic. Chemical, Civil. Engineering Mathe- 
matics and Engineering Physics. Geological. Industrial. Mechanical, and 
Nuclear PZngineering. Aeronautical Engineering is an option in MechanicJil 
Engineering, and Construction Engineering is an option in Civil Engi- 
neering. Graduation requirements are the satisfactory completion of all 
the required courses in any one curriculum and other courses which 
amount to a minimum of 150 semester credit hours. A minimum scholas- 
tic record of a C average is also required. A minimum of six weeks' 
summer employment is required in all curricula. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN A SPECIALIZED BRANCH OF 
ENGINEERING 

This is an earned undergraduate degree and is available through pro- 
grams of study in Furniture Manufacture and Management and in 
Heating and .•\ir Conditioning. The course is planned for four years of 
study. Graduation requirements are the satisfactory completion of all the 



95 



ENGINEERING 

required courses in any one curriculum and other courses which amount 
to a minimum total of 150 semester credit hours. A minimum scholastic 
record of C average is also required. Other requii-ements are the satis- 
factory completion of a week's inspection trip in the senior year and a 
minimum of six weeks' summer employment. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREE IN A SPECIALIZED BRANCH OF 
ENGINEERING 

This is an earned degree which can be obtained only after the Bache- 
lor's degree. The fifth-year curricula are especially designed to meet the 
needs of students desiring intensive specialization in a particular field or 
additional course work not ordinarily covered in the normal four-year 
undergraduate curricula. This professional program of study is offered 
in Ceramic, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Geological, Industrial and Me- 
chanical Engineering. Regulations covering this degree are shown on 
pages 128-129. 

For further information concerning the requirements for the profes- 
sional degree, applications for admission, etc., address Dr. J. H. Lampe, 
Dean of Engineering. North Carolina State College, Raleigh, North 
Carolina. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.) IN A SPECIALIZED BRANCH OF 
ENGINEERING 

This is an earned gi-aduate degree which can be obtained only after 
the Bachelor's degree. It requires at least one year of graduate work, a 
reading knowledge of at least one foreign language, and a thesis showing 
ability to pursue independent research. The core of graduate courses 
taken must emphasize a scientific objective. Further information con- 
cerning the requirements for this degree may be obtained by addressing 
Dr. D. B. Anderson. Director of Graduate Studies, State College, Raleigh, 
North Carolin?.. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE (Ph.D.) 

This is an earned graduate degree offered in Ceramic, Chemical, Elec- 
trical, and Nuclear Engineering, and Engineering Physics. Admission 
requirements are the same as for the master's degree. It requires at least 
two years of graduate work with a major in Ceramic, Chemical, or Elec- 
trical Engineering and a minor either in some field of engineering or in 
an allied sicence. The dissertation will also deal with some problem in the 
field of the student's major interest. Inquiries about this program should 
be addressed to Dr. D. B. Anderson, Director of Graduate Studies, State 
College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 

THE HONORARY DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING (D.Eng.) 
This degree is purely an honorary degree conferred upon men of extra- 
ordinarily high professional engineering attainments who are graduates 
of one of the branches of the University of North Carolina, or upon 
professional engineers who have rendered distinguished services to the 
State of North Carolina. 



NON-SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS — — — — — — — _ — 

SUMMER WORK: INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT 

A minimum of six continuous weeks of gainful employment is a specific 
requirement for graduation in Engineering. This employment may be as 
laborer, sub-professional, or professional assistant in any of the following 
fields: (1) industrial manufacture, repair service, or sales; (2) industrial 
engineering or scientific research; (."5) engineering or architectural de- 
sign, and drafting; (4) engineering exploration, surveying, or reconnais- 
sance; (5) construction of buildings, roads, railroads, dams, and other 
engineering works. 

96 



ENGINEERING 



Students aro roquirt'tl to consult with their department heads as to the 
type of work that will be aeteptable before niakintr arrangements for 
industrial employment. It is desirable that this employment be in the 
student's scholastic major. The required industrial employment should 
be completed during the summer vacation period, which may be the 
one between the sophomore and junior years or the one between the 
junior and senior years, preferably the latter. Students enrolled for ad- 
vanced military traininj? should complete the industrial employment 
requirement between the sophomore and junior years to avoid conflict 
with ROTC Summer Camp. 

The student is responsible for obtaininj; his employment and supplying 
satisfactory evidence thereof to the head of his department. This evidence 
will consist of a letter from the employer to the head of the student's 
department setting; forth (1) inL-lusive dates of employment; (2) character 
of work performed; {'i) type of operation of firm or individual; (4) an 
evaluation of the student's work. This letter must be submitted to the 
department head not later than the end of the Fall semester of the year 
in which the student intends to graduate. 

— — — — — — — — — SHORT COURSES AND INSTITUTES 

The School of Engineering: cooperates with the College Extension 
Division in offering short courses and institutes both on the campus and 
at various centers throughout the State for adults and graduate engi- 
neers. Such courses vary in length from one day to twelve weeks; each 
year the courses offeree! are different and vary according to the public 
demand. The faculty of the School of Engineering usually furnish a large 
portion of the instruction offered in these courses, which in the past have 
been for Electrical Metermen. Gas Plant Operators. Safety Engineers, 
Radio Engineers, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers. Water- 
works Operators, Heating and Plumbing Contractors, and Surveyors. 
Classes are usiially held in Raleigh where the School of Engineering has 
an excellent staff and adequate laboratories and classroom facilities 
available. 

These short courses offer real opportunity to practicing engineering 
personnel to follow a refresher program in their field of interest, as well 
as to become acquainted with the latest and most modern engineering 
procedures and equipment. 

Another educational services activity is that being carried out at the 
Gaston Technical Institute, Gastonia. North Carolina, where a one-year 
post-high school terminal technician program is sponsored by the School 
of Engineering and operated by the E.xtension Division of the College. .A. 
separate full-time staff is employed for this educational program which 
provides an integrated curriculum in English, mathematics, engineering 
drawing, machine shop, welding, electrical maintenance, and economics. 
Graduates of this program are trained for industry with the opportunity 
for rapid acceleration towards positions of foremen, maintenance super- 
visors, etc. 

— — — —CURRICULA OFFERED IN THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Each of the following curricula is not only well-balanced, but offers a 
liberal course of study in a technical and professional field. Each con- 
forms to what is regarded by engineering educators as the best modern 
practice. 

FOR ALL KNGINEERINC; ( IRRK LLA 

Credits 
1 CH lOL 103 (ieneral Inori^anic Chemistry and 

(Jualitafive Analysi.s I I 

ENC. 11L112 (imposition ' .J :i 

E 100 Introduction to Engineering 1 

97 



ENGINEERING 



HI 205 The Modern Western World 

MA 101, 102 First Year Mathematics for Engineers 

ME 101, 102 EnjrineerinK Graphics 

MS 101, 102 Military Science or 

or 

AS 121, 122 Air Science 

PE 101, 102 I'hvsical Education* 






3 


5 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 



18 19 



Credits 



• Students excused from Military Science or Air Science and/or Physical Education will 
schedule equivalent credits in courses outside their department. 

The sophomore, junior and senior programs of study in the various fields of Engineer- 
ing are shown under the department headings on the pages that follow. 

HUMANITIES— SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAM FOR ENGINEERING 
STUDENTS 

A specially desijined sequence of courses comprising- twenty-one (21) 
credit hours is required of all engineering students and is incorporated 
in each curriculum. Its primary objective is to broaden the student in the 
humanities and social sciences and to instill good habits in the use of the 
English language. Following a broad yet basic consideration of history, 
economics and literature, the student progresses to an advanced and in- 
tegrated study of contemporary civilization and of contemporary prob- 
lems. The work of the last semester may be chosen from a group of 
approved electives which are built upon and closely related to the subject 
matter of the previous three years. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

HI 205 The Modern World or 

EC 205 The Economic Process 3 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

HI 205 The Modern World and 

ENG 205* Reading for Discovery 3 3 

or 
EC 205 The Economic Process and 

JUNIOR YEAR 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 3 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 3 3 

SENIOR YEAR 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I and 3 

Approved Elective (see list below) 

SENIOR ELECTIVES FOR HUMANITIES— SOCIAL STUDIES 
PROGRAM 

SS 492 Contemporary Issues II 3 

HI 412 Recent I'nited States History 3 

ENG 366 The American Mind 3 

PS 401 American Parties and Pressure Groups 3 

SOC 401 Human Relations in Industrial Societv 3 

PHI 395 Philosophical Analysis 3 

¥.C 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas 3 



♦History, Economics, and Literature may be scheduled in any order except that ENG 111, 
112, Composition, are prerequisite for ENG 205. Only one course can be scheduled with- 
out special permission. 

Courses from the approved list of senior electives will not be credited to the humanities 
sequence unless ])receded by all other reciuired humanities coui-ses. 

98 



ENGINEERING 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



A curriculum for work leadinj;: to the Bachelor's degree in Ajrricultural 
EnjrineeririK is the joint responsibility of the School of Agriculture and 
the School of Engineering. Each of the schools gives approximately one- 
half the course work. 

For further details concerning the field, see page 42. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Profissor E. M. ScHOENBURN. Head »f the DcpartmcKt 
Professors K. O. Be.^ttY. Jr.. F. P. PiKE 
Associate Professors R. BRIGHT, J. F. Seely 
Assistant Professors J. K. Ferrell. R. A. McAllister 
lustnictors C. A. Pl.\.\k. R. Rozett 

________ ______ —OBJECTIVES 

Chemical Engineering is concerned with the development and applica- 
tion of manufacturing and allied processes in which chemical or certain 
physical changes of material are involved. It involves the application of 
mathematics, chemistry, physics, and fundamental engineering principles 
to the design, construction, operation, control, and improvement of equip- 
ment for carrying out chemical processes on an industrial scale at the 
lowest possible cost. Most of the so-called process industries — the pro- 
duction of chemicals, plastics, rubber, paints, synthetic fibers, petroleum, 
paper, explosives, drugs, food, soap, magnesium, aluminum, glass, ce- 
ment, and numerous others — are inherently chemical engineering in 
nature. To prepare men for careers in industries of these kinds is the 
purpose of the course in Chemical Engineering. 

________ ______ CURRICULUM 

The work of the chemical engineer is so extensive and diversified in 
scope that his training must be along broad and basic lines rather than 
in any one field of specialization. Furthermore, the spirit of research and 
experimentation is vital to the chemical industry so that the development 
not only of a sound technical background but also of a capacity for 
original thought and independent accomplishment is an essential part 
of his program. The undergraduate curriculum emphasizes the engineer- 
ing, the chemical, and the economic principles involved in chemical pro- 
cesses and operations. The work in chemisty including inorganic, ana- 
lytical, physical, and organic chemistry is comparable to that usually 
given to chemists in the first three years with the exception of a reduc- 
tion of time devoted to laborator>- work. The subjects in mechanical and 
electrical engineering, in mechanics and metallurgy are designed to supply 
the fundamentals of these branches. The work in the Chemical Engi- 
neering subjects, although distinctly professional in application, is 
nevertheless basic in character. Since it denends upon a thorough back- 
ground in the sciences, it is postponed until the third and fourth years. 
It is designed to develop initiative, sound habits of thought, and intel- 
lectual curiosity in the student. 



FACILITIES 



The Chemical Engineering Laboratories are provided with pilot plant- 
tvpe equipment for studying the principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, 
distillation, absorption, drying, crushing and grinding, filtration, agita- 
tion, etc. Much new equipment has been installed, and new and special 



99 



ENGINEERING 



apparatus is added from time to time to keep the facilities abreast of 
recent developments in the field. Special equipment for research and in- 
structional purposes is designed and built in the departmental labora- 
tories. In this way students are given first hand acquaintance with 
problems relating to the actual design, construction, and operation of 
typical equipment used in industry. 

OPPORTUNITIES— — __ ______ ____ 

Opportunities for employment in the chemical and allied industries 
upon graduation are numerous and varied. Graduates find employment 
in such fields as: research and development; production, operation, and 
maintenance; management and administration; inspection, testing, and 
process control; technical service and sales; estimation and specification 
writing; consulting and teaching, and many others. Students desiring to 
pursue careers in research and development or in teaching and consulting 
work are strongly advised to consider graduate training. In fact, the 
need for persons who have had advanced ti'aining in the field beyond the 
regular four-year program is continually increasing. 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING _ _ _ 
FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR. REFER TO PAGE 97. 



CH 215 
CHE 205 
EC 205 
ENG 205 
MA 201, 202 
PY 201, 202 
MS 201, 202 

or 
AS 221, 222 
PE 201, 202 



CH 425, 426 
CH 531, 532 
CHE 311 
CHE 411 
EM 341, 342 
EM 343 
SS 301, 302 



CHE 412 
CHE 415 
CHE 431, 
CHE 460 
CHE 470 
CHE 527 
EE 320 
MIM 321 
SS 491 



132 



Quantative Analysis 
Chemical Process Principles I 
The Economic Process 
Reading for Discovery 
Calculus I, II 
General Physics 
Military Science II 

or 
Air Science II 
Physical Education 



Organic Chemistry 
Physical Chemistry 
Chemical Process Principles II 
Unit Operations I 
Engineering Mechanics A, B 
Strength of Materials A 
Contemporary Civilization 
Electives 



Unit Operations II 

Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

Unit Operations Lab I, II 

Seminar 

Chemical Engineering Projects 

Chemical Process Engineering 

Elements of Electrical Engineering 

Metallurgy 

Contemporary Issues I and 

Electives in Humanities 

Electives 



Credits 


4 








4 





3 


3 





4 


4 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 


9 


19 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 








3 


2 


2 





2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


18 


19 


4 





4 





3 


3 


1 





2 








3 





4 





3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



20 



19 



100 



ENGINEERING 

— — — PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Typical Projiiani 

Credits 

("H 101 Special Topics in Inorjjanic Chemistry 3 

CHE 525 Process Measurements and Control 3 

CHE51ti (hemical Reaction Hates 3 

CHE 570 Chemical Ennineerinfj Projects 2 2 

CHE 610. 613 Heat Transfer I. Distillation 3 3 

CHE 660 Chemical Ennineerinji Seminar 1 1 

PY 107 Introduction to Modern Physics 3 

Elect ives 3 3 



GRADUATE STUDY IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Regulations Goveniinji' the Professional Program are Shown on Pages 
132-133. 

Graduate work is offered in Chemical Engineerinji- leading to the de- 
grees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Engi- 
neering. Superior students who can do so are strongly encouraged to 
spend one or more years in advanced study and research since the demand 
of the chemical industry for persons with training beyond the bacca- 
laureate is continually increasing. 

The Chemical Engineering staff and research facilities provide unusual 
opportuniites for basic and applied work in such important fields as fluid 
flow, heat transfer, distillation, diffusional operations, plastic technology, 
etc. Of current interest are special programs in thermal properties of 
materials at both high and low temperatures, in process measurement 
and control, and in the use of radioactive tracers in chemical engineering- 
research. 

For general regulations, the Graduate School Catalog should be 
consulted. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Professor R. E. Fadum, Head of the Departmeut 

Professor Emeritus C. L. Mann 

Professors W. F. Babcock, C. R. Bramer, Carroll L. Mann, Jr. 

Associate Professors C. R. McCullough, N. L. Xkmerow, C. Small- 
wood, M. E. Uyanik 

Assistant Professors A. G. Farkas, C. M. Lambe 

histriictors M. R. Damro.v, Jr., C. P. Fisher, Jr.. C. H. Kahn. L. F. 
Spaine, H. B. Wynoiiam, Jr. 

Teaching Assistants L. S. Agnew, Jr., J. C. Smith 

Research Assistants J. C. Coss, E. J. Salmon, E. J. Struzeski, Jr. 

— — — — — — — — — — _ — _— —CURRICULA 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers two four-year undergrad- 
uate curricula: the one, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Civil 
Engineering; the other, to the degree Bachelor of Civil Engineering 
Construction Option. A fifth-year professional program leading to the 
degree Civil Engineer and a graduate program leading to the degree 
Master of Science in Civil Engineering are also offered by the Depart- 
ment. 

101 



ENGINEERING 

The Civil Engineering curriculum has been accredited by the Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development. It is a well-balanced program of 
study providing academic discipline in the fundamental physical sciences, 
the humanities and social sciences and in the professional fields of civil 
engineering including structural, transportation, and sanitary engi- 
neeiing. 
FACILITIES — — — — _ ______ ____ 

The Department of Civil Engineering is located in the Civil Engi- 
neering Building. This building provides offices, drafting rooms, and 
classrooms as well as laboratory facilities for testing structural ma- 
terials, soils, and bituminous products; for hydraulic experiments; for 
studies in airphoto interpretaton and photogrammetry; for analysis of 
structural models; for chemical and biological tests pertaining to sanitary 
engineers; and for the investigation of transportation problems. In 
addition, the facilities of the Civil Engineering Building include a com- 
fortable student study room, an auditorium, and a departmental library. 
All of these facilities have been designed to provide for effective teaching 
and laboratory instruction and to create a scholarly environment. 
OPPORTUNITIES— — — _ ______ ____ 

Civil Engineering is one of the broadest of the various fields of engi- 
neering. It deals with the planning, design, and construction of buildings, 
bridges, dams, harbor works, water works, water power facilities, sewage 
disposal works, and transportation facilities including highways, railways, 
waterways, airports, and pipe lines. The civil engineer's services are in 
demand by public agencies as well as by private enterprise. The activities 
of the civil engineer are such that opportunities are available for office- 
type as well as field-type employment and for employment in small com- 
munities as well as in large industrial centers. The breadth in scope of 
civil engineering and the variety of types of employment open to the 
civil engineer are such that a student who does not have a strong pre- 
dilection for some special branch of engineering may be safely advised to 
study civil engineering. 
CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING ____ ____ 

FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 

Credits 
CE 201, 202 Surveying I, II .3 3 

EM 311 Engineering Mechanics I 3 

MA 201, 202 Calculus I, II 4 4 

PY 201, 202 General Physics 5 5 

Humanities 3 3 

MS 201. 202 Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221. 222 Air Science II 2 2 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 1 1 

18 21 

CE 305, 306 Transportation Engineering I. II 3 3 

CE 321, 322 Materials Testing Labortorv I. II 2 2 

CE 324 Analysis of Structures I 3 

CE 344 Soil Mechanics 3 

CE 382 Hydraulics 3 

EM 312 Engineering Mechanics II 3 

EM 321 Strength of Materials I 3 

MIG 120 Physical Geology 3 

SS 301. 302 Contemporary Civilization 3 3 

Air or Military Science or 

Elect ives 3 3 



20 20 



102 



ENGINEERING 



Credits 

CE 425 Anahsis of Slructures II 3 

CE 427. 428 Structural Dosimi 1. II 4 3 

CE 481 Hvdrolouv and Drainayt' 2 

CE 482 Water and Sewaue \V«»rks 3 

CE 492. I9;i Professional IVattice I. II 11 

EE 320 Elements of Elect rical Enjjineerinj; 4 

ME 301 Env:ineerinK Thermodynamics I 3 
SS 491 Contemporary Issues I and 

Elective in Humanities 3 3 

Air or Military Science or 

Elect ives 3 3 

19 17 

— — — — — — — ___ —CONSTRUCTION OPTION 



I'rofatsior Carroll L. Mann. Jr., In Charge 

The curriculum in Civil Eiifiineering- Construction Option is a new 
curriculum being- otfered for the first tinie in September, 1954. It is de- 
signed to suit tlie needs of students who are especially interested in the 
construction phases of civil engineering-. It includes the core course 
requirements in the physical sciences and the social sciences and hu- 
manities as established for all engineering- curricula offered at North 
Carolina State College. It differs from the Civil Engineering curriculum 
in that special emphasis is given to the construction aspects of civil 
engineering. To this enil the curriculum iticludes a four-semester sequence 
of courses in estimates and costs and construction planning and organi- 
zation. The courses unique to this curriculum are designed to provide 
academic discipline in the engineering, planning, and management as- 
pects of construction. 

— — — — — — CURRICULUM IN THE CONSTRUCTION OPTION 

FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR. REFER TO I'.V(;E 97. 

Cr**dits 

Construction Surveying I, II 3 3 

Engineering Mechanics A 2 

Calculus I. II 4 4 

(Jenera! Physics ') ."> 

Humanities 3 3 
Alilitary Science 

or 

Air Science 2 2 

I'hvsical Education 1 1 



CE 211. 


212 


E.M 341 




MA 201. 


202 


PY 201, 


202 


MS 201. 


202 


or 




AS 221. 


222 


PE 201. 


202 


CE 321. 


322 


CE 334 




CE 361. 


362 


EC 312 




FE 320 




E.M :U2 




EM 313 




.ME 301 




SS 301. 


302 



18 



Materials Testing Laboratory I. II 
Elements of Structural Analysis 
Estimates and Costs I, II 
Accounting for Engineers 
Elements of Electrical Engineering 
Engineering Mechanics li 
Strength <if Materials A 
I-jigini-ering Thermodynamics I 
( 'ontcmporary Civilisation 
Air or Military Science or 
Elect ives 



2 


2 





.3 


3 


.3 





3 


1 





•) 





2 








3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


19 


20 



103 



ENGINEERING 



CE 4.33. 131 Klements of Structural Design I. II 
CE 4 l.'» Foundations 

CE 461. 462 Project Planning and Control I, II 
CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 

CE 485 Elements of Hydraulics and Hydrology 

CE 492, 493 Professional Practice I. II 
IE 301 Engineering Economy 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I and 

Elective in Humanities 
Air or Military Science or 
Electives 



Credits 



3 


3 





3 


3 


3 





3 


3 





1 


1 


2 





3 


3 


3 


3 


18 


19 



CONSTRUCTION 



The Construction curriculum, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Construction, is being replaced by the curriculum leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineering Construction Option. The 
Construction curriculum will, however, be continued until those students 
enrolled on or before September, 1953, have completed the requirements 
for the degree. 



CURRICULUM IN CONSTRUCTION 

To be terminated June, 1957. 



FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 



Credits 



CE 321, 322 
CE 334 
CE 357, 358 
CE 485 
EC 401, 402 
EE 341 
EM 343 



CE 325. 328 
CE 367, 368 
CE 443 
CE 464 
EC 432 
ENG 231 
IE 301 



Materials Testing Laboratory I. II 

Elements of Structural Analysis 

Estimates and Costs A. B 

Elements of Hydraulics and Hydrology 

Principles of Accounting 

Industrial Electricity 

Strength of Materials A 

Humanities 

Air or Military Science or 

Electives 



Elements of Structural Design A. B 

Project Planning and Control A. B 

Foundations 

Legal Aspects of Contracting 

Industrial Relations 

Basic Speaking Skills 

Engineering Economy 

Humanities 

Air or Military Science or 

Electives 



2 


2 





3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


3 


4 





2 





3 


3 


3 


3 


20 


20 


3 


3 


3 


3 





3 





3 


2 





3 





2 





3 


3 



19 



18 



104 



ENGINEERING 

— — — — — — PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Fifth-year projrranis of study leading to the professional (leK'ree Civil 
Engineer are offered in the followinjr specialty fields: sanitary engineer- 
infr. soil iiieeiianics and foundation enfrineering. structural enuineering, 
and transportation enjrineerintr. The fifth-year curricula, which are made 
up of advanced course work, are offered as a continuation of the four- 
year undergraduate projrrani and are desijrned for students who are 
desirous of becoming; technically proficient in one of the specialty fields 
of civil enyineerinfr. The following curricula are illustrative of the fifth- 
year prog:ranis of study. It is to be understood, however, that a curricu- 
lum for a jriven student is designed in consultation with his advisory 
committee to suit his particular interests. 



Regulations Governing the Professional Program are Shown on Pages 



CURRICULUM IN SANITARY ENGINEERING 



Credits 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Sewage Treatment 3 
CE 572 Unit Operations and I'rocesses in 

Sanitary Engineering 3 

CE 573 Analysis of Water and Sewage 3 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 2 2 

CE 671 .\dvanced Water Supply and Sewage I 

CE 672 Advanced Water and Sewage Treatment 4 

Elect ives 3 (j 

15 13 

CURRICULUM IN SOIL MECHANICS AND FOUNDATION ENGINEERING 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I 3 q 

CE 524 .\nalysis and Design of Masonry Structures 3 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering 3 

CE 54S Soil Testing for Engineering I'urposes 3 

CE 621 Advanced Structural Analysis I 3 Q 

CE 641 Advanced Soil .Mechanics 3 q 

CE 643 H>draulics of (iround Water 3 

MA 401 Differential Equations 3 q 

Electives 3 3 

15 15 



CURRICULUM IN STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 



CE 521, 522 Advanced Structural Design I. II 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering 

CE 621. 622 Advanced Structural Analysis I, II 

EM 551 Advanced Strength of Materials 

EM 602 Theoretical and Applii'd Elasticity 

MA 101 Differential Equations 
Electives 



:i 


3 





3 


3 


3 


3 








3 


3 





3 


3 



15 

105 



ENGINEERING 



CURRICULUM IN TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING 



CE 515 Transportation Analysis 

CE 516 Transportation Planning; 

CE 601, 602 Advanced Transportation Engineering I, II 
CE 603, 604 Transportation Engineering Design I, II 
Electives 



3 








3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6 


6 



15 15 



GRADUATE STUDY IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 



Graduate work is offered in Civil Knjrineering leading to the degree of Master of Science 
in Civil Engineering. Facilities are available for research in airphoto interpretation, 
sanitary engineering, soil mechanics and foundation engineering, structural engineering, 
and transportation engineering. The Graduate School Catalog should be consulted for the 
requirements for the Master of Science degree. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



Professor G. B. Hoadley, Head of the Depart tiietit 

Professor Emeritus William Hand Browne, Jr. 

Professors V. S. Carson, R. S. Fouraker, W. F. Gauster, J. H. Lampe, 

W. D. Stevenson, Jr. 
Visiting Professor J. L. Beaver 

Associate Professors W. J. Barclay, K. B. Glenn, E. W. Winkler 
Assistant Professors A. J. Goetze, E. G. Manning, R. J. Pearsall 
Instructors H. MOTT, H. D. RANDOLPH 

OBJECTIVES— — — — _ ______ ____ 

The purpose of the undergraduate curriculum is to train young men 
for active work in a wide and diversified field. The electrical industry 
demands, above all else, a thorough preparation in the sciences under- 
lying all branches of engineering, a broad foundation in fundamental 
electrical theory, and a clear understanding of the characteristics of 
electrical machinery and systems. These factors are essential for success, 
whether it be in the design and manufacture of electrical equipment, in 
power production and utilization, or in the fields of communication and 
electronics, since in all of these branches of the industi'y technical ad- 
vances ai-e being made with inci'casing rapidity. 

CURRICULUM ____ ______ ____ 

With this object in view, the curriculum in Electrical Engineerig in- 
cludes comprehensive training in mathematics and physics — the funda- 
mental sciences — and adequate training in allied branches of engineering. 
All courses are accompanied by coordinated work in the laboratory and 
intensive drill in the application of theory by means of carefully planned 
problems. In the senior year, the student is offered a choice of Power, 
Communications, oi- Controls. 

The curriculum includes a thorough drill in the preparation and de- 
livery of technical reports. 

Each student is required to spend at least six weeks in satisfactory 
industrial employment before receiving his degree. 

106 



ENGINEERING 



— — — — — — — — ______ _ FACILITIES 

The Departnu'iit is housed in Daniels Hall. It maintains the following 
laboratories: Dynamo, Communications and Electronics, Industrial Elec- 
tronics and Control, Sophomore. Standards, and Photometry. In addition, 
there are an instrument room, a shop, and a number of research rooms. 

— — — — — — — — — DEPARTMENTAL STUDY ACTIVITIES 

Close coordination with the work of the professional electrical enjii- 
neering societies is maintained throuuh the AIEE-IRE Joint Student 
Branch which meets twice a month. Faculty advisers assist the students 
in bringing to these meetings practicing engineers. The Joint Student 
Branch also sponsors departmental activities such as picnics for new 
students and departmental paiticipation in the Engineering Fair. 

An active chapter of Eta Kappa Xu, the national honorary Electrical 
Engineering fraternity, undertakes numerous important projects in 
ad(lition to holding two initiation bancjuets yearly. 

— — — — — — — CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 

Credits 

2 KE 201, 202 Elementary ( ircuits and Fields 4 1 

ENG 205 Reading for Discovery; and 

EC 20.5 The Economic Process 3 3 

MA 201. 202 Calculus I. II 4 4 

F»V 201. 202 General I'hvsics 5 5 

MS 201. 202 -Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 2 2 

PE 201. 202 Physical Education* 1 1 

19 19 

O EE 301. .302 Intermediate Circuits and Fields 4 3 

FE 305, 306 Electrical .Machinery 4 4 

EE 414 Electron Tubes 4 

EM 341, 342 Engineering Mechanics. A. H 2 2 

M.V 401 Differential Equations 3 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 3 3 

Electives 3 3 

19 19 

A EE 411, 412 Electrical Engineering Pro-Seminar 
FE 501. 502 .Advanced Circuits and Fields 
EM 343 Strength of Materials .V 

EM 430 Fluid Mechanics 

ME 301. .?03 Engineering Thermodynamics 
SS 191 Contemporary Issues I 

Departmental Electives^ ^* 

Elective in the Humanities or Social Sciences 

Electives' 

19 19 

• StudenU excused from Military or Air Science and/or Ph.VHical Kducation will schedule 
equivalent credits in courses outside their department. 
•• The Junior and Senior Electives may be taken in advancetl Military Science. If not. 
they are free electives. subject to the approval of the student's adviser and the 
Department Head. 
••♦For these S credit*, students may choose the 8e<iuence ER .511. 512. Electric Com- 
munication, or EE 513. 514. Electric Power Enitinerinir. or P'E 515 Industrial Elec- 
tronics and EE 516 Fundamentals of Servomechanisms. 

107 



1 


1 


3 


3 


2 








2 


3 


.3 


3 








3 


3 


3 



ENGINEERING 



PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING- _ _ _ _ 

A fifth, or professional, year of study is offered in Electrical Engineer- 
ing? as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate program. This fifth 
year of study offers specialized and advanced course work leading to the 
degree of Electrical Engineer. 

Each student taking this fifth year work has his program of courses 
planned to meet his individual needs. The following curricula are illus- 
trated only, and are printed merely to show the sort of program a pro- 
fessional student might follow. 
Regulations Governing the Professional Study are Shown on Pages 



CURRICULUM 
Typical Programs 



EE 605 
EE 635, 636 

EE 637, 638 
EM 531 
EM 554 
MA 511, 512 
ME 401. 102 



ELECTRIC POWER 

Electrical Engineering Seminar 
Dielectric Theory and 
High Voltage Engineering 
Power System Analysis 
Hydraulic Machinery 
Vibration Problems 
Advanced Calculus I, II 
I'ower FMants I, II 



Credits 



3 


3 


3 


3 


2 








3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



15 



15 



COMMUNICATIONS 

EE 605 Electrical Engineering Seminar 1 

EE 611, 612 Communications Network 4 4 

EE 615 Electromagnetic Waves 4 

EE 616 Advanced Radio Engineering 4 

MA 511, 512 AdvancedCalculusI.il 3 3 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics 3 

PY 544 Vibration, Wave Motion, and Acoustics 4 

15 15 



GRADUATE STUDY IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Electrical Engi- 
neering are the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering and the 
Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering. 

At North Carolina State College, the graduate offering in electronics 
and communications includes courses in Electric Communications, Com- 
munication Networks, Advanced Radio Engineering, Radiation and An- 
tennas, and Vacuum Tube Design. These courses are supplemented by 
experimental work carried on in various special departmental labora- 
tories, such as the high-vacuum laboratory and the microwave laboratory. 
These special laboratories, together with a number of small laboratories 
in which graduate students carry on individual research problems, are in 
the newly constructed Daniels Hall addition. 

Graduate students specializing in electric power have the opportunity 
of taking courses in Electric Transmission, Power Network Calculations, 
Theory and Design of Electric Machines, Industrial Electronics and Con- 
trol, High Voltage Engineering, and Power Systems. In this case also 



108 



ENGINEERING 



there are special laboratories such as the high-voltage laboratory and the 
servomeehanisms laboratory, in whieh laboratory instruction related to 
these courses is given, and there are individual research rooms for thesis 
work. 

For further information concerning graduate study in Electrical Engi- 
neering, the current Graduate School Catalog of North Carolina State 
College should be consulted. 



ENGINEERING MECHANICS 



I'n)f(ssor (J. Wallace Smith, Head i>t ih, Dipditnniif 
Professor Adolphus Mitchell 
Associate Professor L. W. Long 
Assistant Professor G. W. MiDDLETON 
histritctors MAURICE H. CLAYTON, G. A. Eason 

— — — — — — — — — __ -UNDERGRADUATE STUDY 

The Department of Engineering Mechanics teaches and administers 
the courses in theoi-etical and applied mechanics, strength of materials, 
and fluid mechanics. These courses are fundamental to the professional 
and design courses of the sevei-al Engineering curiicula. The student is 
expected to acquire a basic knowledge of the physical properties of ma- 
terials and the laws that govern their use in engineering design. 



-------- — ____ GRADUATE STUDY 

A student who is interested in investigation and research, ami who has 
the proper prerequisite, may take a course of study ofll"ered by this de- 
partment whihc leads to the degree of Master of Science in Engineering 
Mechanics. For general regulations of the Graduate School, the Graduate 
School Catalog should be consulted. 



— — -THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING RESEARCH 

N. W. Connor, Director 

Research Professor of Ceramic Etigineerint/ W. C. Bell 

Research Associate Professor of MetuUnrgn H. H. Stadelmaier 

Research Associate Professor of Mechoiiieal Engineeriiig PATRICK H. 

McDonald, .Jr. 
Research Associate KiNc. R. Brose, LAWRENCE B. McGee. Robert A. 

McLean, Frances M. Richardson 
Research Assistants DoRIs Bethune. Robert G. Garvin, Harold A. 

Lamonds, Arthur E. Lucier, .Joseph G. Lundholm. Jr., Ja.mes P. 

Smyly, James T. Tanner, Jr., Charles Terrell, Maynard G. 

Thorne, Elizabeth M. Whitener 
Research Eiigiiieerx .Mason K. Banks, .Alex A. Carlyle. Eucene E. 

Erickson. E. H. Tompkins 
Mineral Dressing Engineers \V. A. FaUST, W. G. VVells 
■Chemist P. N. Sales 
Chief Techniciat: Wade E. Grikfin 
Technicians ALLEN D. Ferguson, R. F. Penny 

109 



ENGINEERING 



OBJECTIVES— ___— ______ ____ 

Research and teaching- are the two responsibilities of the true univer- 
sity. The School of Engineering has a clear appreciation of the obligation 
of education to further man's understanding of the world in which he 
lives and of the contribution of research to effective teaching. Within the 
School, research programs are conducted in many fields of engineering; 
these activities are given strong encouragement and support through the 
Department of Engineering Research. 

As a unit of North Carolina's Land-Grant College, the School of Engi- 
neering is obligated to serve the industrial life of the state. Functioning in 
this capacity, it offers a broad program of service and experimental aid 
through the Department of Engineering Research. Many industries in the 
state have brought problems to the School; association with the industri- 
alists of the state is being sought and strengthened constantly. This 
service is further strengthened through close cooperation with the North 
Carolina Department of Conservation and Development. Particular en- 
couragement and assistance are granted those investigations that give 
promise of new industry to North Carolina. 

FACILITIES _____ ______ ____ 

The Department of Engineering Research, established originally in 
1923 as the Engineering Experiment Station, maintains laboratories 
and a full-time staff devoted exclusively to experimental work. Its opera- 
tions are carried out in close cooperation with the administration and 
faculties of the teaching departments. The abilities of the various de- 
partments of engineering ai-e combined through the Department so that 
the complete research capacity of the School of Engineering is available 
for experimental work in any field. The Department also acts as the 
administrator for the School in negotiations involving research programs 
done for private industry and for governmental agencies. 

The Minerals Research Laboratory in Asheville is engaged in the 
expansion of North Carolina mineral production through facilities for 
the development of improved processes of mineral concentration, or 
examination and appraisal, and chemical analysis. 

The Industrial Experimental Program was created by the 1955 Gen- 
eral Assembly acting upon a request from the School of Engineering. 
Its objective is to provide technical assistance to the State's small 
industry and to promote utilization of its natural resources. 



RESEARCH PROGRAMS — — ______ ____ 

Today the lesearch capacity of the nation is being called upon as a 
resoui-ce for national security. Research facilities of colleges and univer- 
sities are prominent in this defense capacity, and the School of Engineer- 
ing at North Carolina State College is now strong in its abilitv to serve 
among the leading engineering schools of the country. Several i-esearch 
programs sponsored by the services have been in progress for several 
years; the School's capacity for expanded service is large. 

Research currently in progress includes work being done for the Air 
Material Command of the U. S. Air Force, the Office of Ordnance Re- 
seai'ch, the Bureau of Ships, the Wright Air Development Center. Red- 
stone Arsenal, and the Texas Company. Work is included in the fields of 
structural clay products, radiant heating, stress analysis, rotational speed 
deviation measurements, tannin extiaction, recovery from fish waste, 
erosion of plastics, fuel oils, precipitation hardening and diffusion in 
alloys, and electronics. 

Upon their conclusions, results of the engineering investigations are 
published as bulletins so that the information obtained may be made 

110 



ENGINEERING 



available to the public and be contributed to the total field of technical 
knowledge. A complete list of the bulletins published to date or any other 
information pertaining to the operation or availability of the facilities of 
the Department will be furnished upon request. 

— — — — — — — — ___ —RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS 



To assure wider benefits for both Kiaduate and undergraduate students 
from the engineering research activities, the Department offers several 
Research Fellowships and employs some of the more promising and 
deserving students as assistants in the laboratory on a part-time basis. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 



Professor R. G. Carson, Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor E. S. Johnson 

Associate Professor R. D. Furlong 

Assistant Professors R. L. Cope. J. A. Nattress 

Instructors C. W. Maddison. R. D. Kelley 

Visiting Lecturers Rudolph Willard, S. A. Derry 

— — — — — — — — — — — — —— _ OBJECTIVES 

Industrial Engineering is a relatively new branch of the engineering 
profession. Its growth has been steady over the past ten years. As a col- 
lege curriculum, it is the result of a demand by industry for graduates 
who are trained in the fundamentals of engineeiing and who have ac- 
quired a knowledge of how industry is organized and operated. 

— — — — — — — — ______ CURRICULUM 

It is the industrial engineer's job to transform plans, specifications and 
blueprints into plant, equipment and personnel to create the product. 
He is concerned also with controls and plans for the profitable and con- 
tinued operation of an existing plant. 

The Industrial Engineering program at North Carolina State College 
has been planned with this viewpoint in mind. After the first year, which 
is common with all other branches of engineering, the curriculum includes 
courses in Industrial Organization and Management, Motion and Time 
Study, Plant Layout, Quality Control, Job Evaluation, Accounting, Per- 
sonnel and Labor Relations and Production Control together with other 
specialize<l courses which help develop a background and technique for 
understanding our modern industrial system. 

The Industrial Engineering curriculum has been inspected and ac- 
credited by the Engineers' Council for Professional Development. 

Student organizations within the department include a student chapter 
of the American Institute of Industrial Engineers. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — OPPORTUNITIES 

North Carolina has many types of manufacturing in which industrial 
engineers may be employed. Whether the graduate goes into manu- 
facturing, marketing and sales, or business, he is prepared through his 
training to understand the relationship between organization functions. 
This understanding is conducive to a higher efficiency of individual per- 
formance and more rapid preparation for managerial positions. 

m 



ENGINEERING 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING— — — 
FOK THi: FRESHMAN YEAR. REFER TO PAGE 97. 



IE 206 

IE 217, 218 

MA 201. 202 
I»Y 201. 202 
FSY 200 

MS 201, 202 

or 
AS 221, 222 
PE 201. 202 



EC 401 
EM 341. 342 
ENG 321 
IE 301 
IE 328 
IE 332 
IE 343 
ME 301 
ST 361 
SS 301, 302 



Industrial Organization and Management 

Machine Tools and 

Metal Forming 

Calculus I. II 

General Physics 

Introduction to Psychology 

Humanities 

Military Science 

or 
Air Science 
Physical Education 



Principles of Accounting 

Mechanics A. B (Statics, Dynamics) 

Scientific Waiting 

Engineering Economy 

Manufacturing Process 

Motion and Time Study 

Plant Layout and Materials Handling 

Engineering Thermodynamics I 

Introduction to Statistics for Engineers 

Contemporary Civilization 

Military, Air Science or Electives 



Credits 







3 



1 


1 


4 


4 


5 


5 


3 





3 


3 


2 


2 


T 


1 


9 


19 





3 


2 


2 





3 





2 


3 





4 








4 


3 





2 





3 


3 


3 


3 



20 



20 



EE 320 


EM 


1 343 


EM 


430 


IE 


408 


IE 


430 


IE 


443 


IE 


451, 



SS 491 



452 



Elements of Electrical Engineering 

Strength of Materials A and 

Fluid IMechanics 

Production Control 

Job Evaluation and \Vage Administration 

Quality Control 

Seminar 

Group I Elective 

Technical Elective 

Contempt)rary Issues I and 

Elective in Humanities 

Military. Air Science or Electives 



2 




2 


3 












3 


3 







1 




1 





3 


or 2 





3 


or 4 


3 




3 


3 




3 



19 



18 



Group I F^lective; one of the following: 

EC 426 Personnel Management 

EC 431 Labor I'roblems 

EC 433 Industrial Relations 

PSY 337 Industrial Psychology I 

PSY 438 Industrial Psychology II 



112 



ENGINEERING 



— — — — — PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

A fifth, or professional, year <>t' study is olVcred in Imiustrial Kii.u'iiHHM- 
inp: as a continuation of tiie four-year under^rraduate program. This fifth 
year of study offers specialized and advanced course work leadintr to the 
dejri'i'o of Industrial Engineer. 
Regulations Coverinir this Degree are Shown on Pa^es l.'}2-i;?:?. 

Typical I'roiiram 

IE 12;"> Sales and Distribution Methods 

IE 515 Process Enj^ineerinjj 

IE 517 Automatic Processes 

IE 543 Standard Data 

IE 551 Standard Costs for Manufacturing 

IE 581. 582 Project Work 
IE (i35 Planninj^ for Production 

IE 671. 672 Seminar 
Electives 



GRADUATE STUDY IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 



(rt 


'difs 





2 


A 





:i 





3 








3 



For j;eneral regulations, The Graduate School Catalog- should be con- 
sulted. Graduate work is offered in Industrial Engineering leading to the 
degree of Master of Science in Industrial Engineering. 



— -FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT 

I'rofifisor E. Su;URD JoilNSON, In Charm 

— — — — — — — — ______ _ OBJECTIVES 

Any curriculum in the School of Engineering has as an aim the prep- 
aration of men capable of handling the technical problems arising in the 
jobs which they undertake. Where industiy is already equipi)e(l with 
qualified engineer?, the new employee wth a basic engineering education 
can he given on-the-job iraining in analyzing and solving the special 
|)roblems peculiar to the particular plant or industry. 

In the case of the furnituie industry, piactically no experienced engi- 
neers exist. To be of service the College must emphasize to a greater 
extent the application of engineering principles to the problems of the 
furniture industry. This can be done effectively only if the instructional 
staff is aware of the problems of the intlustry from direct contact and not 
merely from academic discussion and the available literature. Conse- 
quently the program has been worked out in conjunction with representa- 
tives of the manufacturers. Their viewpoint is based on a suivey made 
among the entire membership of the Southeiii Furniture Manufacturers' 
Association. Results of the survey indicate an overwhelming interest in 
college training to prepare men for work in this industry. 

— — — — — — — — ______ CURRICULUM 

It is the purpose of the curriculum offering the <legree of IJachelur of 
Science in Furniture Manufacturing to prepare graduates for technical 
and, eventually, executive positions in the furniture industrv. The cur- 
riculum will emphasize the application of engineering to furniture manu- 
facturing. Related subjects covering management, laboi- relations, ac- 
counting, marketing and sales will stress the technical as well as the 
human side of modern production methods and techniques. 

113 



ENGINEERING 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



The Industrial Engineering Department sponsors the Furniture Club, 
whihc is operated by the students. All students in the curriculum are 
eligible for membership in the organization. The club brings in speakers 
from industry and holds social gatherings for the students. 



FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 
FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 



ENG 211 Business Communications 

EN'G 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

FOR 202 Engineering Properties of Wood 

FOR 303 Wood-Moisture Relations 

IE 206 Industrial Organizations and Management 

IE 224 Wood Working Equipment 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 

TX 271 Upholstery Fabrics 

Humanities 

MS 201, 202 Military Science 

or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 



Credits 



3 








3 










2 










3 




4 









3 




2 




1 



19 



18 



EC 401 Principles of Accounting 

FOR 433 Gluing and Plywood 

FOR 443 Wood Finishing 

IE 322 Furniture Design and Construction 

IE 326 Furniture Manufacture and Processing 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for Engineers 

Technical Electives 

Military or Air Science or Electives 






3 


3 








3 


2 








3 


4 





3 





3 


3 





3 


9 


2 


3 


3 



20 



20 



EC 


432 


FOR .563 


IE 


341 


IE 


408 


IE 


430 


IE 


451, 1 


SS 


491 



452 



Industrial Relations 

(Quality Control in ^^ Ood Product 

iNlanufacturing 

Furniture Plant Layout and Design 

Production Control 

.lob Evaluation and Wage Administration 

Seminar 

Contemporary Issues I and 

Elective in Humanities 

Technical Electives 

Military or Air Science or Electives 



3 





3 





3 








3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


6 


3 


3 



19 



18 



114 



ENGINEERING 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



I'rofissor H. A. FisHER, Hrad of the Dv part mint 

Profcsstnii R. C. BUI.I.OCK, J. \V. CELL, J. M. CLARKSON, JaCK LEVINE, 

C. G. MuMFoRD. H. M. Nahikian. H. v. Park, H. Page Williams, 

L. S. WiNTON 

Associate Professors P. E. LEWIS, C. F. Strobel, G. C. Watson 
Assistant Professors E. J. CanADAY, H. C. CookE, ANNA Mae HARRIS, 

C. F. Lewis, D. M. Peterson, V. R. Brantley, C. H. Little. Jr., 
A. R. NOLSTAD. H. A. Petrea 
lustrxctors H. E. Speece, Ruth B. Honeycutt, C. X. Anderson, G. C. 

Caldwell. Martha J. Garren, A. R. Marshall. Carlotta P. 

Patton, W. C. Turner, D. P. Wylie 



________ ______ —OBJECTIVES 

There is great need both in industry and in the field of teaching for 
people trained in applied mathematics. The increasing use of both dik'ital 
and analojr computeis and the shift to automation in industry have 
jriven rise to requirements for mathematics analysts. The Department 
of Mathematics offers opportunities in the elementary and advanced 
courses for the student to leain impoitant concepts in mathematics and 
to apply these to situations in engineering and the sciences. 

________ ______ -CURRICULUM 

The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Mathe- 
matics has been set up to provide the student with a sound foundation 
in mathematics, and at the same time to give enough flexibility to permit 
the student to carry out a rather thorough study in some field of Engi- 
neering. The number of required courses has thus been held to a mini- 
mum in Older that the individual needs of students may be met more 
readilv. It will be the duty of the student's individual adviser to direct 
the student in the choice of a sound program of electives. The curriculum 
is designed especially to meet the needs of students who wish to go into 
positions in industry requiring a good mathematical background and who 
therefore will require mathematics plas a knowledge in some branch of 
application. 

The program for the Master's Degree in Applied Mathematics pre- 
supposes either an undergraduate degree in engineering, or a degree in 
applied mathematics, or a Bachelor of Arts degree with proper emphasis 
in physics or equivalent background material. The student's program 
will be planned by his graduate advisory committee. A minor is required 
in one or two fields of engineering or in statistics. 

_____ CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 

FOR THE FRESHMAN YKAK. REFER TO I'\(;K 97. 

Credits 

4 4 

5 5 

3 3 



2 2 
1 1 

3 3 

18 18 

115 



MA 201, 202 


( aUulus I. 11 




PY 201. 202 


(Jenerai Physics 




ENG 205 


Reading for Discovery 


and 


EC 205 


I'he Ikononiic Process 




MS 201, 202 


.Miiitar> Science II 




or 


or 




AS 221. 222 


Air Science II 




PE 201, 202 


I'hysical Education 
Electives 





ENGINEERING 



MA 401 Differential Equations and 

Mathematics'"' * 
ST 361 Introduction to Statistics 

for Engineers 
SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 

Engineerinp:'-'"' 

Electives, Military or Air Science 

Elect ives" 



20 



19 



MA 511, 512 Advanced Calculus I, II 3 3 

MA 535 An Introduction to Computers and 

Mathematics '•'■' 3 3 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I and 

Elective in Humanities 3 3 

Engineering'" 3 3 

Electives, .Slilitary or Air Science 3 3 
Statistics'-"" or EC 555 Introduction 

to Linear Programming 3 

Electives* 5 

18 20 



* Elective courses are to be chosen subject to approval of the student's adviser and the 
Department Head. A year i6 credits) of a foreign language is recommended and more 
may be taken, e.g. ML 103, 104: 403, 404. 
'* A minimum of 12 credits of work in one or two Departments in Engineering is 



reiiuire the approval of the stu- 
chosen from the following are 



reciuired. This sequence of engineering courses \vi 

dent's adviser or Department Head. Sequences 

recommended : 

E 201. 202; 301, 302; 511, 512. 

EM 311, 312 ■ 322, 430 

CHE 301. 302; 411, 412: 415 

ME 351, 352; 453 

PY 401. 402. 403, 404; 407, 410 

The courses in Mathematics and Statistics may be selected from the following subject 

to approval of the student's adviser and the Department Head: 

MA 402, 403, 404; 501, 502: 514; 522; 532; 541 

ST 515, 516, 521, 522 



CURRICULUM FOR MASTER OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS — 



Prerequisites: 



Drawing 

Mechanics 

Strength of Materials 

Physics 

Differential Equations 



Credits 
4 
6 
3 
4 
3 



3 or 3 



Kequircd Courses: 
MA 511, 512 
MA 541 
MA 602 
MA 611 
MA 632 

A miinmum <jf I'i ad<litional ciedits is re<iuired to be selected in consultation with an 
advisory committee. At least '.I of these 12 hours will be chosen from one or two fields allied 
to mathematics: such as engineei-ing, physics, mechanics, or statistics. Rei)resentative9 
of the departments concerned will serve as members of the advisory committee. 



Advanced Calculus 

Vector Analysis 

Partial Differential Equations 

Complex Variables and .\pplicati<»ns 

Operational .Mathematics 






3 


3 





3 






116 



ENGINEERING 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



I'n)fissu)s K. P. Hans»)N, Head of the Department 

rnifcssors Enicritiiti H. U. Briggs, E. G. Hoefer, L .L. VaU(;iian 

Professors J. S. DooLiTTLE, V. M. Faires, R. B. Knight, J.F. Lee, R. M. 

PiNKERTON, R. B. Rue 
Associate Professors \\ . E. ADAMS, W. S. BRIDGES, T. C. BrowX, P. E. 

Moose 
Assistant Professors J. J. C'LEARY, M. L. English, Lee Harrisberger, 

T. B. Ledbetter, P. B. Leonard, T. J. Martin, J. K. Whitfield 
Instructors D. C. Brown, Malcolm Lewis, H. K. McMillan. T. L. Nash, 

E. H. Stinson 

— — — — — — — — —_ — ___ —OBJECTIVES 

The Mechanical Engineerinjj; Department offers a four-year bachelor's 
progiam in Mechanical Engineering' and in Aeronautical Engineering as 
an option in the Mechanical field. The cuiricula in both Mechanical En- 
gineeriiig and the Aeronautical option are accreditetl by the Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development. 

The mechanical engineer is primarily a designer and builder of ma- 
chines and othei- equipment foi- use in manufacturing processes, trans- 
portation, and the generation of power. He is responsible for the conser- 
vation and economical use of the power-producing lesources of the world 
through the aplication of the proper equipment in each field of pioduc- 
tion. He is called upon to take charge of the management of the manu- 
facturing and power industries. For the mechanical engineer to be well 
grounded in his profession, he must be thoroughly familiar with both the 
science and the art of engineering. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — __ CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in Mechanical Engineering begins with a tiiorough 
training in mathematics, physics, and chemistry, as a foundation for the 
technical work which is later developed along several parallel lines. The 
student is taught how these fundamental sciences are applied to the 
physical properties of the materials of construction and to the transfor- 
mation of heat energy into work and power. This is accomplished by 
means of courses in theory and through instruction in the mechanical 
laboratories. 

The curriculum in Aeronautical Engineering (option under Mechanical 
Engineering) embodies the same basic studies as the Mechanical Engi- 
neering program, specializing in Aeronautical sciences in the junior and 
senior years. Graduates of this curriculum are prepared to take their 
places in the fields of design, production, and research in the .Aeronautical 
industries. 

The primary objective of the Aeronautical Option is to provide general 
training in subjects fundamental to Aeronautical Engineering. In gen- 
eral, the professional subjects are directed toward aerodynamics, struc- 
tures, and airplane design with special emphasis on tlie fundamental 
treatment of aeronautical science; to familiarize the student with the 
principles of flight and with the general criteria of design and construc- 
tion as applied to the airplane. Classroom work is supported by experi- 
mental activities in the aeronautical laboratory which offers facilities 
in wind tunnel, structural, and instrument studies. The first three years 
of study are, for the most part, devoted to fundamental subjects, the 
strictly professional work being deferred until the fourth year. 

Through the training offered in this department, it is hoped that the 
young graduate, after gaining some experience in industry, will be 
qualified to accept the responsibilities which will be imposed upon him 
in Mechanical and Aeronautical industries. 

117 



ENGINEERING 



CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING — — 
FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 



ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 

HI 205 The Modern Western World 

EM 311 Engineering Mechanics I (Statics) 

IE 217, 218 Machine Tool; Metal F^orming 

MA 201, 202 Calculus I, II 

FY 201, 202 General Phvsics I, II 

MS 201, 202 Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 
Elective 



Credits 



3 








3 





3 


1 


1 


4 


4 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 






19 19 



3 








3 





2 


3 





3 


3 


1 


1 


3 








3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



EM 312 Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics) 

EM 321 Strength of Materials I 

EM 430 Fluid Mechanics 

MA 401 Differential Equations 

ME 301, 302 Engineering Thermodynamics I, II 

ME 305, 306 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I, II 

ME 311 Kinematics 

ME 312 Dynamic Analysis 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 

Electives, Military or Air Science 

19 
SUMMER REQUIREMENT: Six weeks' industrial employment 

EE 331, 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering 

ME 401 Power Plants 

ME 405, 406 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III, IV 1 

ME 411, 412 Machine Design I, II 

ME 441 Technical Seminar 

ME 502 Heat Transfer 

MIM 421, 422 Metallurgy I, II 

MIM 423 Metallurgy Laboratory 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I; and 

Elective in Humanities 
Electives, Military or Air Science 



4 


4 


3 





1 


1 


3 


3 


1 








.3 


2 


2 





1 


3 


3 


3 


3 



20 20 



CURRICULUM IN AERONAUTICAL OPTION — — — 
FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 



118 



Reading for Discovery 

The Modern Western World 

Engineering Mechanics I (Statics) 

Machine Tool; Metal Forming 

Calculus I, II 

General Physics I, II 



Credits 



EN 


G 20 


5 


HI 


205 




EM 


311 




IE 


217, 


218 


MA 


201, 


202 


PY 


201, 


202 



3 








3 





3 


1 


1 


4 


4 


5 


5 



.{ 








3 


3 








3 


3 





3 


3 





3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



ENGINEERING 



MS 201, 202 Militury Science II 

or «»r 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 2 2 

VK 201. 202 Physical Kducation 1 1 

Elective 3 

19 19 

.MK 351 Klemcnts of Aeronautical Knyineerin^ 

."NIK 352 Aerodynamics 

EM 312 EnjjineerinK Mechanics II (I)vnamics) 

EM 321 Strength of Materials I 

MA 401 Differential Equations 

ME 301, 302 Enjfineerinjj Thermodynamics I. II 

ME 305, 306 Mechanical Enjjineerin^j Laboratory I, II 

ME 311 Kinematics 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 

Electives, Military or Air Science 

19 19 

SUMMER REQUIREMENT: Six weeks' industrial employment 

ME 441 Technical Seminar 

ME 459 Aircraft Structures 

MFj 455, 156 Aeronautical Laboratory I, II 

ME 461. 462 Airplane Design I, II 

ME 536 Aircraft Engines 

EE 320 Elements of Electrical Enfjineerinp 

MK no .let Propulsion 

MIM 121. 122 Metallurjjv I. II 

MIM 423 Metallurgy Laboratory 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I; and 

Elective in Humanities 

Electives, .Military or Air Science 

20 19 



— — — — — —HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 

Professor R. B. Knkmit, In Charyr 

— — — — — — — — — — _ — — — OBJECTIVES 

The objective of the projrram in Heating and Air Conditioning offered 
by the Mechanical Engineeiing Department is to train young men in this 
specialized field and piepare them to take positions in iiulustry in the 
design, construction, and operation of heating, ventilating, and air con- 
ditioning systems as well as in the management of such industries and as 
sales representatives of companies manufacturing equipment for the 
trade. 

— — — — — — — — — ____— CURRICULUM 

The curriculum has the first year in common with the regular engi- 
neering program and starts specialization in the second year. Sufficient 
basic science courses are required in the first years to establish a firm 
foundation for the more technical courses in the later years. Training is 
accomplished by lecture, recitation, and demonstration work with a liberal 
inclusion of laboiatory work illustrating the theory and drawing atten- 

119 



1 





3 





1 
3 


3 





3 


1 








3 


2 


2 





1 


3 


3 


3 


3 



ENGINEERING 



tion to the practical aspects of the subject. Provision is made for the more 
liberal aspects of college education throug:h the humanities courses. 
Electives in the junior and senior years for those who do not choose 
advanced Military Science allow further liberal or technical education 
in any group of courses which will meet with the objectives of the 
individual. 

DEGREES— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 

The four-year program in Heating and Air Conditioning leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Heating and Air Conditioning. 

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING CURRICULUM — — — — — 
FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO I' AGE 97. 

Credits 

O EC 205 The Economic Process; and 

^ ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 3 3 

EC 312 Accounting for Engineers 3 

ENG 211 Business Communications 3 

EM 341 Mechanics "A" (Statics) 2 

lA 2i5 Sheet Metal 1 

n: 269 Welding and Pipe Shopwork 1 

MA 201 Calculus I 4 

ME 271. 272 Air Conditioning Drawing I, II 2 2 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 4 4 

MS 201, 202 Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 2 2 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 1 1 

20 18 

O CE 351 Details of Building Construction 

** EE 341, 342 Industrial Electricity I. II 

EM 342 Mechanics "B" (Dynamics) 

EM 343 Strength of Materials A 

EM 430 Fluid Mechanics 

ME 371, 372 Elementary Heat Power I. II 

ME 375, 376 Air Conditioning Laboratory I, II 

ME 381 Air Conditioning I 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 

Electives, .Military or Air Science 

20 19 

SUMMER REQUIREMENT: Six weeks' industrial employment. 

A EC 407 Business Law I 

IE 206 Industrial Organization 

IF) 425 Sales and Distribution Methods 

ME 379 Mechanical Equipment of Buildings 

ME 382 Air Conditioning II 

ME 473 Refrigeration 

MF: 475, 476 Air Conditioning Laboratory III. IV 

ME 481, 482 Air Conditioning Design I. II 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I; and 

Elective in Humanities 

Electives. .Military or Air Science 

18 19 

120 



2 





4 


4 


2 





2 








2 


3 


3 


1 


1 





3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






3 


2 








3 





3 


3 





3 





1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



ENGINEERING 



— — — — PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

A fifth, or profi'ssional year of study is orti-red in Mechanical Enjri- 
neerinj;, as a continuation of tlie four-year undergraduate program. This 
fifth year of study offers specialized and advanced work leading to the 
de^rree of Mechanical Engineer. 

Regulations Coverinu this Decree are Shown on Pa^es V.i'Z-V.y.i. 



ClRRICl LIM 



Typical I'rojjrams 



MK 103 
MK 501 
ME 502 
ME 545. 516 

ME 601 
ME 60.'. 
ME 601 
ME 641. fiJJ 



HEAT-POWER 

Internal Combustion Engines 

Steam and Gas Turbines 

Heat Transer 

Project Work in Mechanical 

Enijineerinjr I. II 

Advanced Enjrineerinj; Thermodynamics I 

Advanced Power Plants 

Nuclear Power i'lants 

Mechanical En^rineerinj; Seminar I. II 

Approved Klectives 



Credits 






2 


:i 








3 


2 


2 


3 





.3 







1 


3 
1 


1 

3 


1 

1 



15 



DESIGN 

KM 551 \'il)rati(ui Problems 

MA 101 Differential Equations 

MF]515 Experimental Stress Analysis 

ME 517 Lubrication 

ME 521 Advanced Physical Metallurgy I 

ME 545, 546 Project Work in Mechanical 

Knjrineerintj I. II 

ME 611. 612 Advanced Machine Desijrn I. II 

MF) 611, 612 Mechanical Enji^ineerinK Seminar I. II 






3 


3 





3 








3 


3 





2 


2 


3 

1 


3 
1 



15 



15 



M E 453 




M E 562 




ME 502 




ME 552 




ME 554 




ME 545. 


546 


ME 611. 


612 



AERONAl TI( AL 

Applied Aerodynamics 

Advanced Aircraft Structures 

Meat Transfer 

Aircraft Applied Loads 

Advanced \erod.\ namics 

Project \N<»rk in Mechanical 

Enuineerinji I. II 

Mechanical Enjrineerinji Stminar I. II 

Approved Electives 



3 








3 


3 


3 


3 


(1 




•> 


3 


1 
.3 


1 
6 



15 



121 



ENGINEERING 



GRADUATE STUDY IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING — — _ — — 

Graduate work leading: to the decree of Master of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering; is offered in three specific fields: Heat-Power, Design, and 
Aeronautics. Graduate staff members in these fields are men of national 
reputation for their achievement and competency. Active research pro- 
grams in the fundamentals and applications of Mechanical Engineering 
provide excellent oportunities for graduate students to gain competency 
in their selected field of study. 

For general regulations, the Graduate School Catalog should be 
consulted. 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



Professors W. W. Austin, Head, W. C. Bell, I. Ferenczi, W. W. Kriegel, 

J. M. Parker, III 
Associate Professors W. C. Hackler, E. L. Miller, Jr., H. H. Stadel- 

MAIER 
Instructors R. B. MoFFITT, W. E. MoODY 

OBJECTIVES— — — — — ______ ____ 

The primary objectives of the Department of Mineral Industries are 
the training and professional development of qualified technical and 
administrative leaders for those industries concerned with the location 
and utilization of mineral resources. Included within this scope of opera- 
tion are the fields of Geological, Ceramic and Metallurgical Engineering. 

CURRICULA— ____ ______ ____ 

Complete four-year undergraduate curricula in Geological, Ceramic, 
and Metallurgical Engineering are available in the Department. Fifth 
year professional programs are also available for advanced work and 
specialization in each of these fields, an dgraduate programs leading to 
the Master's and Doctor's degrees in Ceramic Engineering, and to the 
Master's degree in Geological Engineering are offered. 

FACILITIES _____ ______ ____ 

The facilities of the Department of Mineral Industries are housed in 
Page Hall and the Ceramic Building. Located in Page Hall are depart- 
mental offices, drawing rooms, classrooms and extensive laboratory 
facilities for instructional work and research in the three areas of study 
covered by the department. Typical of the numerous well equipped 
laboratories in the building are those established for instruction in the 
following areas of study; ceramic operations and processes, dielectric 
measurements, ceramic microscopy, physical geology, mineralogy, min- 
eral dressing, petrology, physical metallurgy and metallography. Other 
laboratory facilities particularly kilns and furnaces are housed in the 
Ceramic Building next door. Important additional facilities for instruction 
and research are located in the Engineering Research Department's 
Ceramic and Metallurgical Research Laboratories. Here equipment and 
instrumentation are available for advanced work in high temperature 
technology, X-Ray diffraction, radiography, electron microscopy, and 
photomicrography. 

DEPARTMENTAL STUDENT ACTIVITIES ___— ____ 

The Student Branches of the American Ceramic Society and the 
American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers (Rockhound 
Society) through their monthly meetings provide an effective medium 
for the professional growth of the student engineers. Programs include 
presentation of student papers, guest speakers and social contact between 
student and staff. Participation acquaints the student with parliamentary 

122 



ENGINEERING 

and org:anizational proceduit's which ari' of great importance to pro- 
fessional, iiulustriai, aiui civic life. Students are encouraged to attend 
Southeastern Section and National meetings of their respective societies. 
Keramos, the oldest professional engineering fraternity, has an active 
chapter on the campus. This fraternity is dedicated to the promotion of 
scholarship, mental achievement and general service to ceramic engineer- 
ing students. It carries on various projects, one of which is the "Kig 
Brother Project" to help freshmen in their orientation in college life. 

— — — — — — — — ____ CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

The undergraduate curriculum in Ceramic Engineering is the result of 
years of study and development and is designed to meet the challenge 
of modern civilization. The program of study encompasses a thoiough 
grounding in the basic physical sciences and the fundamental disciplines 
of engineering. Processes and operations peculiar to ceramic engineering 
are developed from the viewpoint of interpreting and applying the under- 
lying scientific laws, rather than empirical methods of procedure. The 
phenomena studied include crushing, grinding, classification and packing 
of particles, rheological properties of plastic masses, suspensions and 
slurries, drying of solids, combustion, heat transfer, and high tempera- 
ture chemical reactions. Production at lowest possible cost and improve- 
ment of processes and operations are emphasized throughout the 
program. Attitudes of research, experimentation, and originality of 
thought are fostered. 

Because the Department is dedicated to training young men for leader- 
ship, and because of the recognition that responsible leadership should 
be vested in thinking, well-oriented men, the curriculum includes a 
planned program of social and humanistic studies. This program is 
designed to prepare the student for an understanding and appreciation 
of his responsibilities to society, his profession, and himself, to the end 
that he will lead a fuller, more productive and satisfying life. 

— — — — — — — — __ _ ___ OPPORTUNITIES 

Professional training in ceramic engineering provides opportunities for 
employment in an industry producing a wide variety of essential products 
including glass in all its forms, enamels and protective coatings for 
metals, structural clay products such as brick and tile, refractories for 
furnace linings, thermal insulators, electrical insulators, dielectic com- 
ponents, Portland cement, gypsum products, abrasives, dinnerware, art 
pottery, bath fixtures and hundreds of other items. In addition to these 
"end products" ceramics are finding ever increasing applications in the 
electronic, aviation, guided missile, automotive and atomic energy fields. 
A continuing shortage of qualified personnel in ceramic engineering has 
resulted in far more employment offers than there are graduates. Initial 
employment upon graduation may he in the fields of research and devel- 
opment, in plant operation and control, and in technical sales and service. 
Such employment may lead to positions as directors of research, consult- 
ing and design engineers, sales directors, plant superintendents, produc- 
tion managers and finally administrative officers. 

_________ — — GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 



Geological engineering is a technical field in wliich geological fads 
are combined with engineering techniques for the solution of problems 
concerned mainly with mineral raw material supply and with engineer- 
ing projects. Many major engineering undertakings, such as construfiion 
of large dams and reservoirs, tunnels, and large buildings, depend for 
success in part on an exact knowledge of their geological setting. On 
the other hand, such geological problems as the economical development 
of mineral resources require the use of the precise methods of engineer- 
ing. In the field of geological engineering, then, geology contributes 

123 



ENGINEEPiNG 



data concerning- the constitution, structure, and history of the earth; 
engineering' supplies quantitative, analytical methods whereby physical 
and chemical laws may be controlled for mankind's benefit. The Geological 
Engineering curriculum combines those fundamental disciplines regarded 
as basic to all engineering with training in the aspects of geology that 
are of most practical application to human affairs. 

OPPORTUNITIES — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 

A graduate in this curriculum may follow one of two broad fields of 
engineering, either in the United States or in foreign countries: one, 
the application of geology to engineering work: the other, the application 
of geology in the mineral industries. Geological engineers are currently 
employed and in demand by oil companies and quarrying concerns; 
exploration companies; construction firms; railroads, public utilities, 
banks and insurance companies; iron, steel, and other metal producers; 
manufacturers using non-metallic mineral raw materials, as for ceramics, 
cement, and abrasives, municipal, state, and federal government agencies; 
schools, colleges, museums, and research institutes. The southeastern 
United States off'ers excellent opportunities for geological engineers. 
There is a growing need for the application of geological science to 
engineering construction in connection with highways, foundations, ex- 
cavations, and in water supply problems. The mineral industry of the 
southeast has expanded substantially in the last decade; known deposits 
in the region, as yet only partially developed, include iron, nickel, copper, 
chromite, molybdenite, feldspar, mica, kaolin, cyanite, sillimanite, pyro- 
phyllite, talc, barite, spodumene, sulphur (pyrite), coal, phosphate, 
granite, limestone, and marl. 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING — ___ — — -__- 

The undergraduate curriculum in metallurgical engineering is a 
standard four-year program designed to produce technically trained 
leaders for those industries and agencies associated with the develop- 
ment, production, and fabrication of metals and alloys. The major 
emphasis is on the application of the principles of physical and mechan- 
ical metallurgy to engineering problems encountered in these industries. 
Major sequence courses for the development of this emphasis are offered 
during the third and fourth years of the curriculum and are preceded by 
a well rounded program of basic and engineering sciences, and humani- 
ties. Because of this arrangement it is possible for a student to complete 
the first two years of his training at a suitably qualified liberal arts 
college and to transfer to North Carolina State College for the final two 
years. While such an arrangement is encouraged it is nevertheless ad- 
visable for the prospective transfer student to seek the guidance and 
counsel of the Engineering School Administration at the beginning- of 
his college career, in order to minimize difficulties associated with the 
transfer of credits. 

OPPORTUNITIES — — — — —— — — — — — — — — 

Opportunities open to graduates in metallurgical engineering ^ire 
virtually unlimited. Each year the demand for men with metallurgic-il 
traning becomes more urgent, and the number of positions presentlv 
available is several times greater than the number of graduates. A 
graduate metallurgical engineer mav thus choose from a wide selection 
of companies, locations and tvpes of work. Among the more important 
job opportunities open to metallurgical engineers are those in reseirch 
and development of new alloys so desperately needed as materials of 
construction in the rapidly exnanding fields of chemical, mechanical, 
aeronautical, and nuclear technilogy. With the rapid industrialization of 
the South and particularly the State of North Carolina, new opportuni- 
ties are constantly developing for metallurgical engineers who will play 
a vital role in maintaining the forward progress of the State and region. 

124 



EDUCATION 

— — — — — — — CURRICULUM IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

FOR THK FKKSHMAN YKAK, RlAKli TO I'ACJi: 97. 

Credits 

2 ^^^' 205 The Kconomit- Process 3 
ENG 205 lii'adintr for Discovery 3 
MA 201. 202 Calculus I. II " 4 4 
FY 201. 202 (Jfiu-ral Physics 5 5 
CH 215 (Qualitative Analysis 4 
MIM 201 Structure and Properties of 

Kn^ineerinfj Materials 3 

MS 201. 202 Military Science II 

or or 

AS 211. 212 Air Science II 2 2 

i'K 201, 202 Physical Education 1 1 

18 !9 

* Transfer students who have satiscfactorily completed the equivalent of all first and 
second year courses except MIM 201, and who can piesent acceptable electives in lieu 
of this course will be admitted as third year students in ceramic enRineerinK. Thi.-y 
will be permitted to take this course in addition to the regular third year proKram, 
substitutinjr it for throe ciedits of electives i>ermitted in the third year. 

3 EM 343 Strenjrth ol Materials 2 
•* EM 341. 342 KnjrineerinK Mechanics .V. B 2 2 

CH 531. 532 Phvsical Chemistrv 3 3 

MIG 120 Physical Geolo^v 3 

MIC 301. 302 Ceramic Operations I. II 4 3 

MIG 330 .Mineralo>,'y 3 

SS 301. 302 Contemporary Civilization 3 3 

MIC 312 Ceramic Process Principles I 4 

Fleet ives 3 3 



21 20 



Summer Requirement: Six weeks' industrial employment 

EE 320 Electrical En>;ineerin>r 

MIC 505 Research and Control .Methods 

MIG 531 Optical Mineralogy 

.MIC 113 Ceramic Process Principles II 

.MIC 415, 416 Ceramic Engineering Resign 

.MIC 420 Industrial Ceramics 

.MIC 113 Senior Thesis 

MIC 425 Seminar 

SS 191 ('(tntemporary Issues 

Humanities Elective 

Electives 






4 





3 


3 





4 





2 


2 


3 








3 


1 





3 








3 


3 


3 



19 18 



— — — — — PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

A fifth, or professional, year of study is otlered in Ceramic Engineer- 
in);, as a continuation of the four-year underjrraduate protrram. This 
professional year of study offers specialized advance<i course work leadinj; 
to the de^it'e of Ceramic FZn,<rineer, and is especially desitrneil for those 
planning a career in industrial production activities. Each pro^rram of 
study is desijrned to suit the needs of the individual student. The curri- 
culum shown helow is typical of these proRrams. 

125 



ENGINEERING 



REGULATIONS COVERING PROFESSIONAL STUDY ARE SHOWN 
ON PAGES 132-133. 



Typical Professional Program in Ceramic Engineering 



MIC 507, 508 Advanced Ceramic Experiments 
MIC 511 Advanced Studies in Firing 

MIC 527 Refractories in Service 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 

IE 408 Production Control 

Electives 



Credits 



3 


3 


3 








3 


3 


4 


3 





6 


5 



15 



15 



CURRICULUM IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERNG 



FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 



EC 205 
ENG 205 
MA 201, 202 
PY 201, 202 
CH 215 
MIG 120 
MS 201, 202 

or 
AS 211, 212 
PE 201, 202 



The Economic Process 
Reading for Discovery 
Calculus I, II 
General Physics 
Quantitative Analysis 
Physical Geology" 
Military Science 

or 
Air Science 
Phvsical Education 






3 


3 





4 


4 





.) 





4 


3 





2 


2 


1 


T 



18 



19 



* Transfer students who have satisfactorily completed the e(|iiivalent of all first and 
second year courses except MIG 120, and who can present acceptable electives in lieu 
of this course will be admitted as third year students in geological engineering. They 
will be permitted to take this course in addition to the regular third year program, 
substituting it for three ci-edits of electives permitted in the third yeai". 



EM 341, 342 Mechanics 

EM 343 Strength of Materials 

CH 531, 532 Physical Chemistry 

CE 201 Surveying 

MIG 222 Historical Geology 

MIG 372 Elements of Mining Engineering 

MIG 330 Mineralogy 

MIG 442 Petrology 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization 
Electives 



2 


2 





2 


3 


3 


3 





3 








4 


3 








3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



20 



20 



Summer Requirements: Six weeks' industrial employment. 
Or summer camp in Geological Engineering 



EE 320 Electrical Engineering 

EM 130 Fluid Mechanics 

MIG 351 Structural Geology 

MIG 531 Optical Mineralogy 

MIG 411, 412 Economic Geology 

MIG 452 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 



4 








2 


3 





3 





3 


3 


3 






126 



ENGINEERING 



Credits 

.MK; l(i2 (Jfoloniral SurveyinvT 3 

MK; ISl. 1S2 Senior Seminar 1 1 

SS 491 ("ontemporary Issues 3 

Humanities Klective 3 

Klectives 3 3 

20 18 

— — — — PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

A fifth, or professional, year of study is olfered in Geological Enjii- 
neering, as a continuation of the fourth-year undergraduate program. 
This fifth year of study offers specialized and advanced work leadinj)- to 
the degree of Geological En.yineer. 

Regulations Governing Professional Study are Shown on Pages 132-1:}.'J. 

Typical Professional Program in Geological Engineering 

JC MIG 461 Engineering Geology :i q 

^IIG 522 I'etroleum Geology 3 

-AUG 552 Geophysics 3 

MKi 571, 572 Mining and INlineral Dressing 3 3 

-MIG 581 Geomorphology 3 q 

MIG 611, 612 Advanced Economic Geology 3 3 

F'lectives 3 3 

15 15 

— — — — — CURRICULUM IN METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 
FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 

2 EC 205 The Economic Process 
ENG 205 Reading for Discovery 
MA 201. 202 Calculus I, II 
PY 201, 202 General Studies 
CH 215 Quantitative Analysis 
MIM 201 Structure and Properties of 

Engineering Materials 3 

MS 201. 202 Military Science 

or or 

AS 211, 212 Air Science 2 2 

PR 201, 202 Physical Education 1 1 

18 19 

♦Transfer students who have satisfactorily comi.leted the e.|uivnlent of nil first nn.l 
second year courses except MIM 201. iin<l who can present acceptahle electives in lieu 
of this coui-se will be admitted as third year students in metal lurjfical enRineerinR They 
will be permitted to take this coui-se in addition to the regular third year projfram 
substitutinif it for three credits of electives permitted in the third year. 

3 E.M341.342 Engineering Mechanics 
•* E.M 343 Strength of Materials 

MK; 120 Physical (iecdogv 

CH 531, 532 Physical ( hemistrv 
IE 217, 218 .Machine Tools .Metal Forming 
.MIM 331. 332 Physical Metallurgy I. II 
SS 301. 302 Contemporary Civili/ation 
Electives 

18 20 



127 






3 


3 . 





4 


4 


5 


5 





4 



2 


2 





2 


3 





3 
1 


.3 
1 


1 
3 


1 
3 


3 


3 


3 


6 



ENGINEERING 

Summer Employment: Six weeks' industrial employment. 



EE 320 Electrical Engineering 

EM 430 Fluid Mechanics 

MIG 330 Mineralogy 

MIM 401, 432 Metallurgical Operations 

MIM 431, 432 Metallography 

MIM 451 Seminar 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues 

Humanities Elective 

Electives 



Credits 






4 


2 





3 





3 


3 


4 


4 





1 


3 








3 



20 20 



PROFESSIONAL STUDY IN METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING _ _ _ 

A fifth, or professional, year of study is offered in Metallurgical En- 
gineering, as a continuation of the four-year undergraduate program. 
This professional year of study offers specialized and advanced course 
work leading to the degree of Metallurgical Engineer, and is especially 
designed for those planning a career in industrial production activities. 
Each program of study is designed to suit the needs of the individual 
student. The curriculum shown below is typical of these programs. 

REGULATIONS COVERING PROFESSIONAL STUDY ARE SHOWN 
ON PAGES 132-133. 



Typical Professional Program in Metallurgical Engineering 



MIM 521, 522 Advanced Physical Metallurgy 

MIM 523, 524 Metallurgical Factors in Design 

MIM 445, 446 Experimental Engineering 

PY 407 Modern Physics 

CHE 502 Electrochemical Engineering 

ME 502 Heat Transfer 

ME 515 Experimental Stress Analysis 

MIM 651 Metallurgical Engineering Seminar 



THE PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 



Credits 



3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 








3 


3 








3 


1 


1 



15 15 



ProfcsHur Clifford K. Beck, Head of the Department and Director of 

Nuclear Reactor 
Professor and Graduate Adiiiinistrator in the Department, A. C. 

Menius, Jr. 
Professor and DepHfi) Director of the Nuclear Reactor, R. L. Murray 
Professors F. W. LANCASTER, J. S. Meares, R. H. Snyder, Newton 

Underwood 

Associate Professors R. F. StAINBACK, ARTHUR WALTNER, W. D. WHITE- 
HEAD 

Assistant Professors J. H. Barrett, E. J. BROWN, J. T. Lynn 
Research Assistant Rachel Hackney, H. A. Lamonds, J. G. Lundholm, 

Jr., C. W. Terrell 
Instructors A. B. ALTER, F. R. Crownfield, Clyde B. Fulmer, Minnie 

C. Harris 

128 



ENGINEERING 



OBJECTIVES 



Physics is one of the basic sciences upon which Agriculture, En^jineer- 
injr, and other branches of technology are based. The Department, there- 
fore, offers several general physics courses adapted to the needs of other 
departments anti a number of advanced courses in specialized fields of 
physics available as electives to graduates and undergraduates of all 
departments. 

In addition to its program of service instruction in support of and in 
cooperation with programs of training in other technical fields, tlie 
Physics Department otfeis under its own guidance coherent instructioiial 
programs in two applied fields: Engineering Physics and Nuclear Engi- 
neering. Curricula have been developed \n each of these fields at both the 
undergraduate and graduate levls. 

Organization of an integral course of study in Nuclear Engineering, 
first accomplished in li>50. represented a pioneering educational venture 
into this new area of engineering experience. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — CURRICULA 

ENGINEERING PHYSICS 

The curricula in Engineering Physics are designed to provide a student 
with foundation training in and a working knowledge of both general 
physics and basic engineering. It is anticipated that such a program will 
develop men with the ability to use the skills and methods of engineering 
in applying the principles of physics in the pursuit of research objective's 
or in the practical solution of engineering problems. A combination of 
both theoretical and applied courses is specified, together with the usual 
requirements in humanities (at the undergraduate level ). and some lati- 
tude in program orientation to particular interests through the inclusioii 
of course electives. 

There is a rapidly growing demand for men with practical skill aiid 
strong scientific foundation to pursue the multiplying problems in the 
borderline fields between engineering and pure physics. The Engineering 
Physics program is designed to meet this need. 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

The Nuclear Engineering Curricula are offered in response to the 
rapidly growing demand of industry and research organizations for 
engineers equipped with the basic knowledge and technology of radio- 
activity and nuclear processes. The field of nuclear engineering practice 
is so broad that practically all branches of science and engineering are 
involved; hence one could not hope in four or even five years to become 
proficient in all phases. The general curriculum is planned, therefore, to 
include a basic core of required courses and a number of technical elective 
courses which are to be scheduled, with the assistance of an adviser, in 
one or two of several general fields of interest. In the sophomore or junior 
year the student in Nuclear Engineering selects, according to his interest, 
the engineering field in which he wishes broader training: Chemical. 
Electrical, Mechanical, etc. The technical elective courses relating to this 
field of interest are then scheduled. 

A Bachelor of Nuclear Engineering degree is awarded upon satisfac- 
tory completion of the prescribed four-year curriculum. For those desir- 
ing further trainine. graduate programs terminating in a Master's or a 
Doctor's degree in Nuclear Engineering are offered. 



129 



ENGINEERING 



CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS - _______ 

FOR THK FHKSH.MAN VKAH. REFER TO PAGE 97. 

Credits 

2 EM 341 Mechanics A (Statics) 2 

Humanities 3 3 

IE 227. 228 Machine Tool Laboratory 1 1 

MA 201, 202 Calculus I. II 4 4 

FY 201, 202 General Fhvsics 5 5 
MS 201, 202 Military Science 

or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science 2 2 

TE 201, 202 Physical Education 1 1 

Technical Electives 3 

19 IS 

O EE 331, 332 Principles of Electrical Enp:ineerinjj 4 4 

•* EM 342, 343 Mechanics B (Dynamics); 
Strength of Materials A 
MA 401 Differential Equations 

PY 401, 402 Intermediate Physics I 
PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics 

SS 301, 302 Contemporary Civilization " 

Electives, Military or Air Science 



EM 430 Fluid Mechanics 

ME 301 Enjjineeringj Thermodynamics I 

PY 403. ;04 Intermediate Physics 11 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I and 

Elective in Humanities 

Technical Electives 

Electives, Military or Air Science 



2 


2 


3 





4 


4 





3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



19 19 






2 


3 





4 


4 


3 


3 


6 


8 


3 


3 



19 20 






2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


5 



CURRICULUM IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING _ _ _ _ 
FOR THE FRESHMAN YEAR, REFER TO PAGE 97. 

O EM 341 Engineering Mechanics A (Statics) 

Humanities 
MA 201, 202 Calculus I, II 
PY 201. 202 General Phvsics 
MS 201. 202 Military Science 

or or 

AS 221. 222 Air Science 2 2 

PE 201. 202 Physical Education 1 1 

Technical Electives 3 

18 17 

O EM 342 Engineering Mechanics IJ (Dynamics) 2 

** EM 343 Strength of Materials A 2 

MA 401 Differential Equations 3 

<" Advanced Calculus or Advanced 

Differential Equations) 3 

130 



ENGINEERING 



MK 30 r 




I'Y 101. 


102 


V\ tOH. 


101 


I'V 107 




I'Y MO 




SS 302 





Knpini'i'rinjr Thermodynamics I 
Intermediate Thysies I or 
Intermediate Physics II 
Introduction to Modern I'hysics 
Nuclear I'hysics I 
Contemporary Civilization 
Klectives. .Military or Air Science 



EE 320 I!lements of Electrical Knv:ineerinjr 

EM 130 Fluid Mechanics 

I'Y 419 Introduction to Nuclear Ennineerinf; 

TY ;)1S Radiation Hazard and Protection 

PY 520 Physical Technolojjy in Radioactivity 

PY 530 Elementary Nuclear Reactor Theory 

SS 491 Contemporary Issues I and 

Elective in Humanities 

Technical Electives 

Electives, Military or Air Science 



Credits 





3 


4 


1 


3 








4 


3 


3 


3 


3 



20 20 



1 








2 


2 





3 








3 





3 


3 


3 


5 


8 


3 


3 



20 20 



GRADUATE STUDY 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 



The Master of Science program in Engineering Physics and in Nuclear 
Engineering is so designated that a fully prepared student should be able 
to qualify for the degree in one year. "Full preparation" is interpreted to 
mean possession of a working knowledge of the material specified in the 
undergraduate program listed above. 

Where students transfer into Engineering Physics after an under- 
graduate program in pure science or tingineering. which, incideiitially. is 
frequently done and has been found to result in commendable cumulative 
training experience, an extra term and sometimes two of preparatory 
work is required. 



— CURRICULUM FOR MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS 

Credits 

Mathematics (above JOO level) fi 

PY 601. 602 Advanced (;eneral Physics 6 

PY 670 Seminar 2 

PY 690 Research "j 

Electives* 12 

30 

* CHE 415. Chemical Ensrincerintr ThermcHlynamica, may be substituted. 
•• The elective courses should form a coherent pattern. At least .S semester h<nii-8 must 
be selecte<l in one lor two closely related! fields of enirineerinK or enicineerinK and 
mathematics. 



131 



ENGINEERING 

CURRICULUM FOR MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Mathematics (above 100 level) 6 

At least three of the following courses 9 

Credits 
PY 518 Radiation Hazard and Protection 

PY 610 Advanced Nuclear Physics 

PY 611 Quantum .Mechanics 

PY 619 Heterojreneous Reactor Design 

I*Y 630 Homogeneous Reactor Design 

PY 670 Seminar 2 

PY 690 Research 4 

Electives* 9 

30 

* Of the technical elective courses 6 semester hours must be selected to form a coherent 
sequence in a selected field of engineering. In general, selection is made from such fields 
of apiilication as : 

Mechanical-Metallurgical 
Heat Transfer-Power Generation 
Chemistry-Chemical Engineering 
Instrumentation. Control Mechanisms 
Theoretical : Mathematics. Reactor Design 
Biological Sciences. Biochemistry. Physics 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

In the spring of 1950 the Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North 
Carolina granted authority to the Physics Department of State College to enroll students 
for training to the doctorate level. In addition to the resources and facilities of the Physics 
Department, those of other departments at State College and of the Physics and Mathe- 
matics Departments of the University of Noith Carolina at Chapel Hill are available 
to these advanced students as their particular programs may i-etiuire. Facilities are most 
extensive for work in the general fields of applied nuclear physics and solid state physics. 
The usual rules and regulations of the Graduate School apply to students enrolled in the 
doctorate pi-ogram in Physics. For general regulations, the Graduate School Catalog 
should be consulted. 



THE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING — — 

The School of Engineering offers fifth-year professional curricula 
leading to the degrees Ceramic Engineer, Civil Engineer. Chemical 
Engineer, Geological Engineer, Industrial Engineer and Mechanical 
Engineer. These curricula are tailor-made to fit the particular needs of 
each student with a view that upon completion of a program the student 
will be prepared to pursue a professional career in engineering. 

It is the intent of the fifth-year program to emphasize professional 
course work rather than research. To this end, a curriculum is comprised 
of 30 semester credits of course work requiring of the student a minimum 
of one academic year in residence; neither a thesis nor a reading knowl- 
edge of a foreign language is required. Samples of curricula that met 
the requirements of the fifth-year program may be found under the 
appropriate Departmental cuiricula. These curricula are to be considered 
illustrative; the actual programs of study will be especially designed to 
fit the needs of the individual student. 

ADMISSION ______ _________ 

Applicants who hold the bachelor's degree in engineering from recog- 
nized colleges will be admitted to the professional program of the School 
of Engineering upon presentation of official credentials. For uncondi- 
tional admission, these credentials must show the completion, with a 
minimum average grade of 25 quality points (C+), of an amount of 
undergraduate work in the proposed field of professional study corre- 

132 



ENGINEERING 

spondence to that norniallv required for a bachelor's degree in th it 
field. 

Admission on a professional basis may be granted applicants who <lo 
not meet the formal requirements. In case of insufficient preparation, 
prerequisite courses will be prescribed in addition to the normal fifth- 
year course requirements. 

Applications for admission, accompanied by full credentials in the form 
of transcripts of academic records, should l)e filed in the office of the 
Dean of Engineering at least thirty days in advance of the semester in 
which admission is sought. 



______ _ __ _ — —GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The following regulations of the School of Engineering will be observed: 

1. An undergraduate enrolled at North Carolina State College, who 
plans to undertake a professional program and who has fulfilled all re- 
quirements for the bachelor's degree except one or two courses, may be 
permitted to enroll in certain courses and later obtain credit toward the 
professional degree provided the student gives notice of his purpose to 
the Dean of the School of Engineering. The maximum credit to be ob- 
tained in this way is 6 semester course credits. 

2. Credit for professional work to be applied toward the requirements 
for the professional degree, not to exceed 6 semester credits, may be 
transferred to North Carolina State College from recognized institutions 
of university grade ofi'cring advanced work in engineering and related 
fields. Such a transfer of credit must be recommended by the head of the 
department in which the student does his major work and it must be 
approved by the Dean of Engineering. 

'A. Fifth-year students are classified as post-baccalaureate students 
and are subject to rules and regulations as established and administeretl 
by the Dean of Engineering. 

4. Grades for each completed course are reported to the Dean of En- 
gineering and to the Office of Registration. A minimum grade of C must 
be made in each course to obtain credit. A quality point average of 2.5 
(C-|-) in all course work must be attained to satisfy requirements for a 
professional degree. 

5. Work completed more than six years prior to the date on which the 
professional degree is to be granted may not be used as credit toward 
the professional degree, unless approved by the head of the department 
concerned and the Dean of Engineering. 

6. Each fifth-year student will be assigned to a committee consisting 
of his department head and the professor in charge of the work in which 
he is majoring. The function of this committee is to assist the student 
in preparing a program of study and to counsel him in his academic 
work. The student will be required, with the assistance of his committee, 
to prepare a complete plan of study before mid-semester of his first 
semester in residence. This program of study is subject to the approval 
of the Dean of Engineering. 



133 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



RICHARD J. PRESTON, DEAN 

Professor J. V. Hoffmann, Director Eincrifus and Manager Sorth Caro- 
lina F'orestry Foioidation 

Professors J. S. Bethel, R. C. Bryant, R. M. Carter, C. E. Libby, T. E. 
Maki, G. K. Slocum, L. Wyman 

Professor E»ieriti(s L. Wyman 

Associate Professor W. D. MILLER 

Assistant Professors A. C. Barefoot, C. A. Hart. R. G. Hitchings, 
B. J. Zobel 

Special Lecturer H. O. Cook 

Geneticist R. L. McElwee 



INTRODUCTORY 



While forestry ha sbeen recognized and practiced for centuries in 
Europe, this profession is relatively new in the United States, datinjr 
from about the bejiinning- of the present century. Durinjr the period of 
rapid expansion and development of our country the forests were badly 
neglected and abused. Now, however, with our timber suplies depleted 
and the value of timber products increasing, sound forest practices have 
been accepted as economically desirable and feasible. Increasing the 
productivity and quality of our forests is basic to the welfare of the 
Southeast. The importance of the forest resource in the economy of 
North Carolina is brought out by the fact that sixty-two per cent of 
the land area is in forest, with wood products industries ranking next 
to textiles as a source of industrial employment. 

Through a program which offers a broad training in the physical and 
biological sciences as well as a sound cultural background the School of 
Forestry prepares students for service in the two major professional 
fields of forest maagement and wood utilization. 

CURRICULA ______ _________ 

The School offers undergraduate instruction leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in the two major professional fields of forest manage- 
ment and wood utilization, the latter including Wood Technology, Pulj) 
and Paper Technology, and Wood Products Merchandising. All curricula 
have a common freshman year thus enabling the student to postpone 
selection of a major fiekl until he has had an opportunity to become 
acquainted with its scope and possibilities. 

Forest Management deals with all phases of the management of wild 
lands and includes such related sui)jects as water-shed protection, wild- 
life management, and recreation. In order that the student may be ade- 
quately piepared for work of such diverse nature, the curriculum pro- 
vides training in such subjects as silviculture, timber estimating, manage- 
ment, fire prevention and control, foiest pathology, insect control, forest 
soils, economics, and other aspects of land use. 

The course of study in Wood Technology, which is concerned with the 
technical aspects of utilization, includes training in all types of wood 
using and wood manufacturing industries. It incorporates technical and 
practical principles of logging, milling, seasoning, gluing, preserving, 
finishing, fabricating, and machining. 

134 



FORESTRY 



Pulp and Paper Technologry trains men for work in pulp and paper 
plants. Students are iriver thoroutrh traininn in chemistry, mathematics, 
physics, wood structure and properties, pulping processes, and engineer- 
injr subjects related to pulp and paper manufacturing- 
Wood Products Merchandisinj; covers the distribution, selling, and use 
of lumber and of products made from wood. This curriculum combines 
a broad background of business administration with a sound knowled>re 
of the product bein^r handled. 



— — — — — — — — — ______ -DEGREES 

The Bachelor of Science deprree is conferred upon completion of any 
of the four-year curricula in the areas mentioned above. 

Professional preparation beyond the four-year curricula is desirable, 
and qualified students are urged to plan a five-year program leading to 
the Master's degree. For students desiring a thorough professional back- 
ground, the School offers the degree of Master of Forestry or of Master 
of Wood Technology; the degree of Master of Science in these two fields 
is offered for those desiring specialization in the fields of scientific 
research. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in several fields in 
forestry. 

Further information regarding graduate study is contained in the 
Graduate School Catalog which may be obtained from the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

— — — — — — — — — — —FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS 

The School of Forestry is housed in Kilgore Hall on the west side of 
the campus. This new forestry building provides outstanding classroom 
and laboratory facilities. 

WOOD PRODUCTS LABORATORY 

The Wood Products Laboratory, housed on the first floor of the new 
Forestry Building and in separate buildings on Western Boulevard, con- 
tains general wood shop equipment, a veneer lathe and clipper, glue 
mi.xers and spreaders, tape machine and hot presses, testing equipment, 
preservation tanks, a modern dry kiln, and two portable sawmills. This 
equipment, available for teaching, student experience and research, pro- 
vides an unexcelled laboratory for practical production processing of 
dimension stock, furniture, plywood and other wood products. 

PULP AND PAPER LABORATORY 

The recently completed Pulp and Paper Laboratory located on Western 
Boulevard provides modern offices and classrooms as well as laboratories 
for pulping, paper making, paper and pulp testing, coloring, and fiber 

analysis. 

SCHOOL FORESTS 

The School of Forestry, with more than 82,000 acres of forest land 
available and three permanent field camps, has facilities unexcelled in 
many respects for field instruction and research. 

The Hofmann Forest, owned and operated by the North Carolina 
Forestry Foundation for the benefit of the School of Forestry, consists 
of approximately 78,000 acres located in Jones and Onslow counties in the 
southeastern portion of the state. Pond and loblolly pine together with 
hardwood and cypress swamps characterize this tract. Part of the spring 
semester of the Senior year is spent in the permanent camp located in 
this forest. 

The George Watts Hill Demonstration Forest is a tract of 1,500 acres 
located sixteen miles north of Durham. This typically piedmont forest of 
rolling terrain contains stands of loblolly, shortleaf and Virginia pines 
along with numerous hardwoods. The permanent sumer camp for sopho- 
mores is located in this area. 

135 



FORESTRY 



The Wayah Recreational Area in the North Carolina National Forest 
near Franklin is located in a typical mountain forest. Facilities at this 
area have been leased from the Government. Portions of the spring 
semester of the Senior year and of the sophomore summer camp are held 
in permanent quarters on this mountain tract. 

The Richland Creek Farm Forest of .'300 acres located four miles north- 
west of the campus is beinji- developed into a model farm forest and is 
used for field instruction near the campus. 

The Hope Valley Forest is a 1700-acre tract located five miles south- 
east of Chapel Hill and is used for instruction and research. 

The School nursery, located on the campus, is fully equipped for 
instruction puii)oses and the production of planting stock. 
FIELD INSTRUCTION AND EXPERIENCE 

All students are requiied to present a minimum of one summer of 
acceptable work experience in ordei to meet the graduation requirements. 
Students are required to consult with their advisers regarding the types 
of employment that will be acceptable. 

The ten-week Sophomore summer camp is a general requirement for 
students in the Forest Management, Wood Technology, and Wood Prod- 
ucts Merchandising curricula. Students in the Forestry Management 
curriculum are also required to attend camp during the last half of the 
spring semester of the Senior year. Permanent, well-equipped camps are 
maintained in coastal, piedmont, and mountain forests. A "C" average is 
required for admission to these camps. 

Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative wood 
industries are required of all students as a part of their class assign- 
ments. To cover the costs of this off -campus training, all students en- 
rolled in the School of Forestry pay a field laboratory fee of $10.00 each 
year at the time they first register for the school year. Room rent of 
$20.00 is charged for both the summer and spring camps. 

OPPORTUNITIES— — — — — _________ 

A wide and rapidly expanding field of employment possibilites is avail- 
able in the Southeast to young men trained in forestry. Until recent 
years most job oportunities were with government agencies in managing 
public forests, and this still constitutes a major source of employment. 
These agencies include state and federal forest services, extension 
services, and other groups such as the Soil Consrvation Service and the 
Tennessee Valley Authority. 

In recent years job opportunities with private industries have expanded 
greatly. Increasing numbers of technically trained young men are enter- 
ing a wide variety of professional positions in the fields of forest land 
management, watershed management, logging, sawmilling, veneer and 
plywood manufacturing, pulp and paper making, kiln drying, wood 
preservation, and the manufacture of wood products such as furniture, 
dimension stock, and various prefabricated items. 

The merchandising of lumber and lumber products offers numerous 
oportunities for students qualifid for sales, business administration, or 
small building construction. Sawmills and lumber yards, plywood and 
paper manufacturers, and flooring, wallboard, and other forest products 
plants need trained men. 

Exceptional students will find oportunities for employment in research 
or teaching. This type of work ordinarily requires a graduate degree. 
There has been an increasing demand for well-trained woodlands man- 
agers and wood technologists, as well as for research workers in govern- 
ment experiment stations and laboratories. 

Over eighty per cent of the graduates of the School of Foresti'y are 
now employed in some field of forest or wood products work. The few 
students who have not followed the forestry profession have found their 
college education sufficiently broad to provide a sound basis for a 
wide vp.riety of work. 

136 



FORESTRY 



_________ ____ -SHORT COURSES 

In cooperation with tlie College Extension Division and ollui- ilei)arl- 
ments of State CoIle«:e, short courses are offered to personnel in wood- 
usiny: industries. These courses vary from a few days to a few weeks in 
length and cover such subjects as aerial photo interpretation, lumber 
merchandising, seasoning and kiln drying, lumber grading, gluing, wood 
preservation, and quality control and wood finishing. Additional courses 
in other fields of forestry will be offered as the need arises. In addition to 
the faculty of the School of F^orestry, experts from the trade associations, 
federal laboratories, and private inclustry are called in to furnish instruc- 
tion. Class and laboratory facilities of State College are available for 
these courses. These vocational courses provide to men in industry an 
opportunity to keep abreast of modern developments in methods and 
equipment. 

_ _ _ _ _ FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

A number of undergratluate scholarshii)s, ivsearcli assistantshijjs, and 
teaching fellowships are available to qualified students. Students in- 
terested in applying should write to the Dean of the School of Forestry. 

The Hofmann Loan Fund was established by alumni of the School of 
Forestry to honor Dr. J. V. Hofmann, the first Director of the Division. 
Loans to worthy students are available through the Student Loan Fund 
established by the State College Alumni Association. 

Many students help pay their expenses through part-time work at the 
College or in town. The Self-Help Secretary of the College Y.M.C.A. 
assists in locating employment. 

_____ COURSES OF STUDY IN THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

FOR ALL F0RP:STRY CURRICULA 

Credits 
1 HO lOL 102 General Botany 3 3 

CH 101. 103 General Inorganic Chemistry; General 

or and (Qualitative Chemistry ; or 

CH 203 (Jeneral and Organic Chemistry 4 4 

ENGni.112 Composition 3 3 

FOR lOL 102 Introduction to Forestry 2 2 

MA in, 112 .\lgebra and Trigonometry; .\nalytic 
(Jeometry and 

Calculus .\ 4 4 

MS 101. 102 Military Science I 

or or 

AS 121, 122 Air Science I 2 2 

PK 101. 102 Physical Kducation 1 1 

19 19 

• Students with a mnthemalics ileficiency or low plnfement test score will start chemistry 
durinx the sprinK semester and will take a science course in place of chemistry durintr 
the fall semester. 

Students in Forest Management, or Woo<l Products Merchandisintt will take CH 20:?. 
Organic Chemistry, the second semester; students in Pulp and Paper Tifhnolojty or 
WimmI TechnoloKy will take CH \0:i. Qualitative Analysis. 

______ — — — FOREST MANAGEMENT 

Professor T. E. Maki, /*( Charyc 

_________ ______ OBJECTIVES 

Forest Management is the application of sound forestry principles in 
the woods. The Forest Manager considers individual trees, stands, types, 
and the entire forest. It is necessary, then, that he have a knowledge of 

137 



FORESTRY 



the biological relationships within the forest and of the methods of con- 
trolling' and usinjj these relationships. He must have also a knowledge 
of the economic factors concerned in the business side of forestry and 
of the methods of measuring' forest products and forest stands. 

CURRICULUM _____ _________ 

The curriculum in Forest Manasement is orjjanized to provide a broad 
basic training- and also to permit limited specialization. To accomplish the 
latter goal, the curriculum includes 18 elective credits. At the beginning 
of his junior year, the student selects one of the five areas of speciali- 
zation listed and chooses courses listed under this field for his elective 
credits. 

The curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forest 
Management. A minimum of 157 ci-edits is required for graduation. 

OPPORTUNITIES ____— _________ 

Students who complete the curriculum are trained for positions with 
pulp companies, lumber companies, and othei private landowners; fed- 
eral and state forest services; agricultural extension; and for private 
enterprise as consultants, forest landowners, or sawmill operators. 

CURRICULUM IN FOREST MANAGEMENT— _ — ___ — _ 



SUMMER CAMP 



SUMMER CAMP 



Credits 



SOI 200 




Soils 





4 


BO 211, 


212 


Dendrology 


2 


2 


CE 217 




Forestry Surveying 





4 


EC 201 




Economics 


3 





FOR 201 




Wood Structures and Properties 


3 





FY 211 




General Physics 


4 









Social Science Electives 


3 


3 


ZO 102 




General Zoology 





3 


MS 201, 


202 


Military Science II 






or 




or 






AS 221, 


222 


Air Science II 


2 


2 


PE 201, 


202 


Physical Education 


1 


1 



19 



FOR S204 


Silviculture 




2 


FOR S214 


Dendrology 




2 


FOR S224 


Forest Mapping 




2 


FOR S264 


Protection and Utilization 




2 


FOR S274 


Mensuration 




2 
10 


BO 421 


Plant Physiology 


4 





BO 441 


Plant Ecology 


3 





ENG 321 


Scientific Writing and English Elective 


3 


3 


ENT 301 


Introduction to Forest Insects 


3 





FOR 361 


Silvics 





3 


FOR 372 


Mensuration 


3 





PP 318 


Diseases of Forest Trees 





3 




Social Science Elective 





3 




Electives 


3 


6 



19 



18 



138 



FORESTRY 



Credits 



FOU 


tot 


FOR 


to.-» 


FOR 


t06 


FOR 


407 


FOR 


423 


FOR 


511 


FOR 


512 


FOR 


531 


FOR 


553 


ST 311 



Manaut'ment I'lans (Camp) 

Forest Inventory (Camp) 

Fort'st Industries (Camp) 

Field Silviculture (Camp) 

L»)Ujiinn and Millinjj (JS Weeks) 

Silviculture 

Forest Kconomics 

Forest Manaj^ement (8 Weeks) 

Forest Photojrrammetry (8 Weeks) 

Introduction to Statistics 

Klectives 






3 





2 





2 





2 





3 


3 





3 








3 





2 


3 





9 






18 



r 



— — — — — FOREST MANAGEMENT, FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION 

A student should select one of the following fields of specialization 
and choose elective courses from those listed under each fiedl. 



GENERAL FORESTRY 



Credits 



FOR 422 
FOR 452 
FOR 462 
FOR 472 
FOR 501 
GEE 120 
RS 301 
ZO 312 



Forest Products 

Forest (Jrazinp 

Artificial Forestation 

Forest Policy and Administration 

Forest Valuation 

Physical Geolojjy 

Soci»>loji:y of Rural Life 

Game iManajrement 



3 





2 








2 


2 





3 





3 


or 3 


3 


or 3 


3 






UTILIZATION 



421 
433 



FOR 303 
FOR 401 
FOR 
FOR 
FOR 441 
FOR 442 
FOR 443 
FOR 481 



Wood-.Moisture Relations 

Wood ("reservation 

Loji and Lumber (Jrades and Specifications 

Gluing and Plywood 

Mechanical Properties of Wood 

Furniture Construction and Assembly 

Wood Finishinjj 

Pulping Processes and Products 






2 





2 





2 


3 





3 





3 








3 


2 






FOREST WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 



FOR 452 
ZO 101 
ZO 252 
ZO 301 
ZO 521 
ZO 522 
ZO 544 
ZO 551. 552 



Forest (Jrazinn 

General Zoology 

Ornithojojiy 

Animal Physiology 

Limnology 

Animal Ecology 

Mammolony 

Wildlife Management 



3 or 3 



3 or 3 



3 








3 





3 


3 


3 



FOREST NIRSERY PRA( Tl( E 



AGE 321 
SOI 341 
EC tit 
HO 412 



Irrigation, Drainage & Terracing 
Soil Fertility & Management 
Weeds and Their Control 
General Macteriology 



t 













4 

3 


4 


or 


4 



139 



FORESTRY 



HO r)32. 533 Advanced Plant Physiology 

KC 101, 402 Principles of Accounting 

P2NT 571 Forest Entomology 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 

HRT 301 Plant Propagation 

HRT 311 Nursery Practice 

HRT 481 Breeding of Horticulture Plants 

PARKS AND RECRKATION 

BO 203 Introduction to Systematic Botany 

GEE 120 Physical Geology 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 

RS 301 Sociology of Rural Life 

SOC 202 Man and Society (General Sociology) 

ZO 101 General Zoology 

ZO 252 Ornithology 

ZO 544 Mammalogy 

GRADUATE OR RESEARCH 

BO 203 Introduction to Systematic Botany 

CH 103 General and Qualitative Analysis 

CH 215 Quantitative Chemistry 

MA 211, 212 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B, C 

ML Foreign Language 

FY 212 General Physics 



WOOD TECHNOLOGY — - 

I'yofessor R. M. Carter, hi Charge 



2 


2 


3 


3 


3 





3 


or 3 


3 


or 3 


3 





3 











3 


3 


or 


3 


3 


or 


3 


3 


or 


3 


3 


or 


3 


3 


or 


3 







3 







3 






3 


4 


or 4 


4 


or 4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



CURRICULUM — ___— _________ 

The Wood Technology Curriculum trains men for many assignments 
in manufacturing wood products. It involves a basic knowledge of the 
sciences combined with business economics. Experience in wood manu- 
facturing methods is gained by student operation of modern production 
equipment in the Wood Products Laboratory. In addition, all students 
graduating from this curriculum must have a minimum of one summer's 
acceptable work experience. 

An opportunity for student selection of courses to meet special interests 
is provided through 26 elective credits. At the beginning of the Junior 
year, each student selects one of the three listed fields of specialization 
and chooses for his elective credits courses listed under this field. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Wood 
Technology. A minimum of 158 credits is required for graduation. 

OPPORTUNITIES — _ — — — ____ — — — — — 

A career with wood industries offers a variety of opportunities for 
young men trained in wood properties, manufacturing operations, and 
business methods. The application of new processes and materials in the 
conversion of timber into the thousands of wood products has created a 
demand for technically trained men. Comi)anies manufacturing lumber, 
veneer and plywood, hardwood dimension stock, furniture, millwork, 
flooring, pianos, caskets, wood turnings, adhesives, preservatives, finish- 
ing materials and composition boards are types of industries interested in 
employing graduates. 

140 



FORESTRY 

CURRICULUM IN WOOD TECHNOLOGY 

( redits 



("H 203 Orjranic Chemistry 

V.C 201 Kcoiunnics 

KOK 201 W(»u(l Striuturo and I'roperties 

FOR MV.i Wood-Moisturo Itelations 

IK 221 \V«)od Workinj; l-.tiuipmont 

y\\ 211. 212 Analytic- (Jeonutry and Calculus M. (' 

MK 101 I'.njiinoerinn (Jraphics 

I'Y 211, 212 (Jenerai I'hysios 

MS 201. 202 Military Science II 

or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 

TE 201, 202 Physical Education 






3 


3 





3 








3 





3 


3 


3 


•> 

1 




1 


2 
1 


2 
1 



18 19 



SUMMER (AMI' 

FOR S204 Silviculture 2 

FOR S214 Uendrolojiv 2 

FOR S221 Forest Mapping 2 

FOR S264 Protection and Utilization 2 

FOR S274 Mensuration 2 

10 



ENTf 231 Basic Speaking' Skills 

FOR 421 Lor and Lumber (Jrades and Specification^ 

FOR 423 Lonjrinjr and Millinji 

FOR 433 (;iuinK and Plywood 

FOR 141 Mechanical Properties of Wood 

ST 3fil Statistics and Eal)orator.\ 

Social Science Elect ives 

Electives 



English Elective 
FOR 101 Wood Preservation 

FOR 102 Foundations of Forest Mananemenl 

FOR 112 Furniture Construction and Asseml)l\ 

FOR 113 Wood Finishinj: 

FOR r)12 Forest I'.conomics 

FOR 533 Advanced \\ mtd Structure and 

FOR r)63 Identification 

(Quality ( ontrol in Wood I'roduct 

Manufacture 

Social Science Elective 

Electives 






3 





2 


3 





3 





3 








3 


3 


3 


fi 


8 



18 19 






3 





2 


•) 





3 








3 


3 






3 








3 


ti 


B 



19 17 



• StudenU with comparable experience, upon faculty approval, mny substitute one ad- 
ditional summer's work experience for Summer Camp. After completion of 12 weeks 
of plant experience and presentation of a satisfactory report, three hours of academic 
credit will i>e granted. 

141 



FORESTRY 



WOOD TECHNOLOGY, FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION- _ — _ — — 

A .studi-nt should select one of the following fields of specialization. 
Courses marked with an asterisk (■) are required. Technical electives 
should be scheduled from the remaining courses listed in the field of 
specialization. 



HARDWOOD DLMKNSION AND LLMBKR 

EC 401, 402* Principles of Accounting 

EC 425 Industrial Management 

EC 426 Personnel .Management 

EC 431 Labor Problems 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 

EC 504, 505* Principles of Cost .\ccounting 

EE 350 Electrical Applications in Wood Products 

ENG 211* Business Communications 

FOR 372 .Mensuration 

FOR 422 Forest Products 

FOR 431* Dimension Stock .Manufacturing 

IE 322 Furniture Design and Construction 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 

IE 341 Furniture Planning, Layout and Design 

IE 408* Production Control 

PSY 337 Industrial Psychology I 

VENEER AND PLYWOOD 

CHE 543 Technology of Plastics 

CH 215 Quantitative .\nalysis 

CH 425. 426 Organic Chemistry 

EC 40r Principles of Accounting 

EC 426 Personnel Management 

EC 504* Principles of Cost .Accounting 

EE 350* Electrical Applications in Wood Products 

FOR 422 Forest Products 

FOR 431 Dimension Stock .Manufacturing 

FOR 432 .Merchandising Forest Products 

FOR 481 Pulping Processes and Products 

FOR 513* Tropical Woods 

IE 332 Motion and Time Study 

IE 408 Production Control 

IE 430 Job Evaluation and Wage .Vdministration 

ME 304* Fundamentals of Heat I'ower 

PSY 337 Industrial Psychology I 

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 

BO 410 Plant Histology and Microtechnique 

CHE 301, 302 Elements of Chemical Engineering 

CHE 543 Technology of Plastics 

CH 351 Introductory Biochemistry 

CH 125. I2r) Organic Chemistry 

EE 350 Electrical .Vpplications in Wood Products 

FOR 422 Forest Products 

FOR 481 Pulping Processes and IVoducts 

FOR 513 Tropical Woods 

FOR 542 Fiber Analysis 

M.A 401 Differential Equations 

ME 304 Fundamentals of Heat Power 

ML .Modern Languages 

PY 401, 402 Intermediate Physics I 

ST 515, 516 Experimental Statistics for Engineers 



Credits 



3 


3 


3 








3 


2 or 


2 


2 or 


2 


3 


3 





3 


3 or 


3 





3 


3 





3 





2 








4 


3 





3 





3 or 


3 





3 


4 or 


4 


3 


3 


3 








3 


3 





3 





3 





3 





2 





2 








2 





4 


3 








4 


3 





3 or 


3 


3 





3 


3 





3 


3 





3 


3 





3 


3 





2 








2 





2 


3 





3 





3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 



142 



FORESTRY 

PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY 

I'lofcssur C. E. LlBBY. /// Chdiyc 
— — — — — — —CURRICULA 



The pulp and papcM- tochnolojiy curriculum offered by the School of 
Forestry at North Carolina State College is designed to train men for 
work in connection with the mechanical and chemical utlization of woods 
in the mills of pulp and ])aper comiianies. This curriculum developed in 
cooperation with the Departments of Chemistry and Chemical En>i:i- 
neeriny emphasizes the basic sciences essential to technical traininj? in 
pulp and paper manufacture. It includes a thorough study of the wood 
pulping- processes, chemical arid by-product recovery, pulp bleaching" and 
the various papermakiny- operations such as refininjj-, sizing;, filling, color- 
injr, coatinji", and converting'. (Jraduates are qualified for work in mill 
laboratory and quality control departments and for general plant produc- 
tion jobs. High scholarship students are urged to undertake graduate 
study after obtaining the Bachelor's degree, continuing either at this 
college or elsewhere in schools of papermaking, chemistry, or chemical 
engineering. 

The program has received widespread interest and help from the pulp 
and paper industry. Fifty-eight of the majoi- companies in the South are 
giving active support and have established the Reuben B. Robertson 
Distinguished Professorship as well as several scholarships. Two com- 
mittees of pulp and paper executives have worked with the faculty in 
establishing an approved curriculum which has been designated by tlie 
Southern Regional Education Board as the four-year undergraduate 
program for the Southeast. 

All students majoring in this curriculum are excused from the sopho- 
more summer camp required of other forestry students, but are required 
to spend this summer working in a pulp or paper mill where the arrange- 
ments have been made by the College for such employment. Three hours 
of academic credit are granted the student after completion of 12 weeks 
of mill work and presentation of a satisfactory rei)ort covering this 
work experience. In addition to this minimum work reciuirement, students 
are urged to work in mills the remaining summers between academic 
years because of the great value of practical experience in this industry. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pulp 
and Paper Technology. A minimum of 157 credits is required for 
graduation. 

— — — — — CURRICULUM IN PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY 

Credits 



CH 21.") Ouiintitativf Anahsis 

KN(; 231 Basic Speaking Skills 

EN(; 321 Scientidc Writing 

FO!{ 201 \\ Ood Structure and I'roperfies 

MA 211, 212 Analytic (;e«»metrv and ( alcuhis B, C 

MK 101. 102 Kngineering (Jraphics I. II 

BY 211. 212 (Jeneral Physics 

PSY 200 Introduction to (Jeneral Psychology 

MS 201. 202 Militar\ Science II 

or or 

AS 221. 222 Air Science II 

PE 201. 202 I'hysical Education 



4 








.3 





.3 









.3 

•> 





1 



19 



143 



FORESTRY 



FOR 591 



Forestry Problems — Mill Experience 



CHE 301, 302 Elements of Chemical Engineering 

CH 425, 126 Oriianic Chemistry 

CH 531, 532 Physical Chemistry 

EE 350 Electrical Applications in Wood Products 

Manufacturing 
FOR 321. 322 Plup and Paper Technology 
FOR 533 Advanced Wood Structure and 

Identification 
FOR 542 Fiber Analysis 

ME 304 Fundamentals of Heat Power 

Electives 



Ci 


r edits 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


3 


2 








2 


3 





9 


9 



19 



19 



EC 201 Economics 

FOR 403 Paper Technology Laboratory 

FOR 411, 412 Pulp and Paper Mill Equipment 
FOR 413 Paper Testing Laboratory 

FOR 451 Paper Coloring Laboratory 

FOR 461 Paper Converting 

FOR 463 Plant Inspections 

FOR 471 Pulp Technology Laboratory 

FOR 482 Pulp and Paper Mill Management 

FOR 591, 592 Research Problem 
TC 511 Chemistry of Fibers 

General Electives 
Social Science Elective 



3 








2 


3 


2 


2 








2 


1 








1 


4 








2 


1 


4 


2 





3 


3 





3 



19 



19 



WOOD PRODUCTS MERCHANDISING 



Professor R. M. CARTER, hi Charge 



CURRICULUM 



The distribution of lumber and other wood products and their proper 
utilization comprises the third curriculum of the wood technology- 
utilization branch of forestry. It is intended to fill the need for personnel 
trained both in business methods and in the basic characteristics and 
properties of the products and structures made out of wood. Methods 
of manufacturing, merchandising, business administration, preparation 
of plans and specifications, and a i\nowledge of other building materials 
form an intet^ral part of the curriculum. 

An opportunity for student selection of courses to meet special in- 
terests is provided through 24 elective credits. At the beginning of the 
Junior year each student selects one of the three fields of specialization 
listed and chooses for his elective credits courses listed under this field. 

This curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in W^ood 
Products Merchandising. A minimum of 158 credits is required for 
giaduation. 



144 



FORESTRY 



OPPORTUNITIES 



This cuiriculuni trains men in lijrht buildinjr construction, wood prod- 
ucts manufacturinjr and nuMchandisin^r for a wide variety of production 
and inarkitinjr positions with sawmills; retail and wholesale lumber 
yards, or brokerage firms; plywood and paper manufacturers; roofing' 
felt, wallboard, flooring and furniture plants; and industries providing 
trade outlets for other wood products and associated materials. 



CURRICULUM IN WOOD PRODUCTS MERCHANDISING 



(redils 



( K 217 Forestry Surveying 

K(" 201 Kconomics 

ENG 231 l?asic Speaking Skills 

FOR 201 Wood Structure and Properties 

FOK 303 Wood Moisture Relations 

lEl 224 >N'ood Working Equipment 

ME 101. 102 Engineering Graphics I. II 

PY 211. 212 (;eneral Physics 

MS 201. 202 Military Science 

or or 

AS 221. 222 Air Science 

FE 201, 202 Physical Education 



SIMMER CAMP 



19 



FOR S204 Silviculture 

FOR S214 Dendrology 

FOR S221 Forest Mapping 

FOR S2r)4 Protection and Utilization 

FOR S274 Mensuration 



10 



EC 202 Economics 

EC 315 Salesmanship 

V,C 407 Business Law 

EC 411 Marketing Methods and Sales Management 

English Elective 
FOR 421 Lou and Lumber (Jrades and Specifications 

FOR 423 Louuinu and Milling 

F'OR 433 Gluing and Ply»ood 

Elect ives 



3 








2 





3 


3 








3 





2 


3 





3 





6 


8 



18 



EC 101 i'rincipits »if Accounting 

EC 410 Manufacturinu Accounting' 

EC 42.5. 426 industrial Management and Personnel 

Management 
FOR 401 Wood Preservation 








3 


3 



3 
2 



145 



FORESTRY 



Credits 

FOR 402 Foundations of Forest Management 2 

FOR 432 Marchandisinp Forest Products 2 

FOR 441 Mechanical Properties of Wood 3 

FOR 453 Lumber Structures 3 

FOR 512 Forest Economics 3 

Elect ives 3 7 

19 18 

* Students with comparable experience, upon faculty approval, may substitute one ad- 
ditional summer's work experience for Summer Camp. After completion of 12 weeks 
of plant experience and presentation of a satisfactory report, three hours of academic 
credit will be granted. 



WOOD PRODUCTS MERCHANDISING, FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION— — 

A student should select one of the following fields of specialization. 
Courses marked with an asterisk (■) are required. Technical electives 
should be scheduled from the remaining- courses listed in the field of 
specialization. 



BUILDING MATERIALS 



CE 351''' Details of Building Construction 

CE 361* Estimates and Costs I 

EC 415=- Advertising 

EC 420 Corporation Finance 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 

EC 501 Advanced Economic Theory 

EE 350 Electrical Applications in Wood Products 

ENG 332* Argumentation and Persuasion 

FOR 422 Forest Products 

TECHNICAL SALES AND SERVICE 

CHE; 205 Chemical Process Principles I 

CHE 543 Technology of Plastics 

EC 415* Advertising 

EC 420 Corporation Finance 

EC 521 Office Management 

EE 350 Electrical .Applications in Wood Products 

ENG 332* Argumentation and Persuasion 

FOR 422* Forest Products 

FOR 443 Wood Finishing 

FOR 481 Pulping Processes 

FOR 563 Quality Control 

M.\ 211. 212* .Analytic Geometry and Calculus B, C 

ME 301 P'undamentals of Heat Power 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for Engineers 

LUMBER AND PLYWOOD 

EC 415* Advertising 

EC 420 Corporation Finance 

EC 432 Industrial Relations 

ENG 332* Argumentation and Persuasion 

FOR 422* Poorest Products 

FOR 443 Wood Finishing 

FOR 513 Tropical Woods 

146 



Credit;' 



2 







3 







2 


or 


2 


3 







2 


or 


2 







3 







3 


3 







3 













4 







3 


2 


or 


2 


3 







3 


)r 


3 







3 


3 







3 












3 


2 







3 







3 




3 


3 







3 


or 


3 



2 


or 2 


3 





2 


or 2 


3 





3 








3 





2 



GENERAL STUDIES 



Credits 
FOR 533 Advanced \> Ood Structure and 

IdentiJication 2 

FOU ofiS (Quality ( ontrtil in Wood Products 

Manufacturinji 3 

ST 3B1 Inlroduttion to Statistics for Knjjineers 3 or 3 

• Students with compiii Hl>le e\|«fiifiiio. uixm riiciilty approval, may siilmtitute one ad- 
ditional summer's work experience for Summer Camp. After completion of 12 weeks 
of plant experience and \)resentation of a satisfactory report, three houi-s of academic 
credit will lie granted. 



SCHOOL OF GENERAL STUDIES 



C. ADDISON HICKMAN, DEAN 



INTRODUCTORY 



When it became the Land-Grant CoUetre of North Carolina. State 
Colleg:e inherited a lonjr tradition of education, callinjr for furnishing 
maximum service to all the citizens of the state. Its projjress from the 
first, therefore, embraced the finest technical traininjr based on the 
most thorousrh research, coupled with the humane and social studies 
necessary in developing individuals of the highest character and civic 
responsibility. From the be^rinniuK, State Collejre, like other Land-Grant 
colleges, has taken as its tioal this two-fold function: training: men of 
professional and technical leadership who are at the same time men of 
social leadership, whole men able to live as enlightened free citizens 
in our democratic state. 

With the consolidation of State College into the University of North 
Carolina in li):55. this double function was given further recognition. A 
Basic Division was formed which, without granting degrees in liberal 
arts, was to form a bioad base on which all technical education was to 
he built. Specifically, the Basic Division was charged with instruction in 
the fields of humanities and social sciences, physical education and recre- 
ation, and was committed to provide the opportunities in general edu- 
cation necessary for a well-rounded i)rogram in all the technical fields 
pursued by Stiite College students. In this, the Basic Division was in 
effect an integral part of all the technical schools, since it brought to 
bear on all students of all academic years the impact of instruction in 
the area of the humanities and social sciences to implement instruction in 
technical and professional subjects in the degree-granting Schools. That 
this instruction was deemed significant at State College is sliown by the 
fact that the portion of curricular time devoti-d to these studies grad- 
ually increased until more than one-fourth of class instruction was done 
in the area.•^ embraced by the Basic Division. P'urther recognition of the 
importance of the general education of technical students came with 
the action of the Board of Trustees in May. Iit52. when the Basic Division 
was renamed the School of General Studies and placed on an equal basis 
with the technical schools of State College. 

147 



GENERAL STUDIES 



OBJECTIVES 



The over-all objectives of the School of General Studies have become 
clear through the years. Its purposes are: to develop the student's com- 
munication and reading skills through the study of language and litera- 
ture; to increase his understanding of the complex economic, social, po- 
litical, and philosophical world in v/hich he will live and work; to develop 
in him a sense of social responsibility as a scientist and technical leader 
in the world of technology and science; to teach him to think critically 
and scientifically in the social world of men as he does in the material 
world of his profession; to quicken his appreciation of the role played 
by both science and the arts in human affairs. Beyond the fundamental 
training in these fields as required by the technical curricula of the 
Schools, the School of General Studies also provides additional elective 
work in these areas so that each student may pursue further his own 
interests. 

ORGANIZATION — _ — — _ _________ 

The School of General Studies includes the Departments of Economics, 
English, History and Political Science, Modern Languages, Philosophy 
and Religion, Physical Education, Social Studies, and Sociology and An- 
thropology. The Dean and the department heads constitute the Adminis- 
trative Board of the School of General Studies. This Board works with 
the School Faculty in matters of policy and instruction. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 



Professor Clark Lee Allen, Head of the Department 

Professors C. Addison Hickman, R. O. Moen, C. B. Shulenberger, 

' T. W. Wood 
Associate Professors E. A. Fails, Cleon W. Harrell. J. A. Lyons 
Assistant Professors A. J. Bartley, C. D. Clark, M. M. Gaffney, B. M. 

Olsen, V. S. PiKNER, O. G. Thompson 
Lecturers D. R. DiXON, j. A. LYONS 

Ivstriietors CATHERINE W. Abruzzi, Allisone M. Clarke, Newell B. 
Ham, Tom Martinssk 

The Department of Economics seeks to help students understand the 
economic process, the nature and functioning of our economy, and use- 
ful a])proaches and methods of economic analysis. In pursuance of this 
end, the department has a representative offering of courses in the major 
fields of economic theory, applied economics, and business operation. 
Athough most of the courses offered by the department are primarily or 
exclusively for undergraduate students, many courses are open to grad- 
uates, and several courses have been designed primarily for students 
working toward advanced degrees in the technical schools. Members of 
the department are also engaged in extension work, as well as in 
research. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



Professor LoDWICK Hartley, Head of the Department 

Professors J. D. Clark, A. M. Fountain, A. I. Ladu, R. P. Marshall, 

J. W. Shirley 
Associate Professors P. H. Davis, H. G. Kincheloe, E. H. Paget, A. B. R. 

Shelley, R. G. Walser, R. B. Wynne, D. J. Rulfs, L. H. Swain 

148 



GENERAL STUDIES 

Assistant f^rofcssors WILLIAM Barmiart, F. H. MooRE, P. J. RuST. J. 
SUBERMAN, L. R. WHUHARD 

histrxctois L. H. Antokak, H. G. Eldridce. Jr., A. S. Kxowles, Jr.. 

L. F. Ladd, B. G. Koonce. Jr.. Jai k Porter. G. F. Provost. X. G. 

Smith, Huldah B. Turner. P. Williams, Jr.. R. L. Zimmerman 
\'iiiitiiiy Professor SADIE J. Harmon 

The Department of English has as its primary objective teaching the 
student to read, think, write, and speak clearly and effectively, an 
objective which it accomplishes through basic courses in composition, 
in speech, and in advanced writing. As a secondary aim. the department 
seeks to give the stuiient an awareness of his cultural heiitage and of th' 
development of the civilization of which he is a part. This aim it attempts 
to achieve through courses which stress the development of Western and 
American thought as expressed in literature. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND 
— — — — —POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Professor PreSTON W. Edsall, Head of the Department 

Associate Professors L. W. Barnhardt, S. Noblin, P. M. RiCE, L. W. 

SEEGERS. 
Assistant Professors M. L. Brown, Jr., A. HoLTZMAN, C. F. KoLB, L. F. 

Reitzer 
Iiijitriictor B. F. BEERS 

An understanding of the historical background of our times and of 
political principles and governmental systems is expected of the educated 
man. This department, by giving specially designed courses, both elective 
and required, seeks to aid students in gaining this understanding. While 
most courses offered in history and political science are designed for 
undergraduates, the department offers a few graduate courses which may 
be built into the programs of students working for advanced degrees. It 
also cooperates with the College Extension Division in making selected 
courses available to adults who are not resident on the State College 
campus. 



— — — THE DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

Associate Professor George W. Poland, Head of the Departmott 

Associate Professor S. T. Ballenger 

Assistant Professors F. J. .Allred, Rl'TH B. HALL 

The Department of Modern Languages provides instruction in French. 
German, Spanish, and Italian, as well as special instruction in English 
for foreign students. It also offers courses in the literature and culture 
of these language areas. 

The Department cooperates with graduate and research programs by 
offering special courses for graduate stu<lents in connection with lan- 
guage requirements for advanced degrees and by providing translation 
service. Through a special feature of instruction, graduate students en- 
rolled in technical and scientificate courses translate projects in their 
field of major interest. Upon satisfactory completion of these projects, 
the students submit them as evidence of reading ability in the particular 
laniruage. The translations are then made available to interested in- 
dividuals or agencies. 

149 



GENERAL STUDIES 



THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION- — 

I'ldfissor W . X. Hicks. Head of the I)('i)ait))ictit 

Assistant F^rofcssors P. A. Bredenberg, W. L. Highfill, J. L. MiDDLETON 

Instructor \V. C. FITZGERALD, Jr. 

The primary function of the department is to provide basic courses in 
religion and philosophy especially designed to serve students in the 
several degree-granting schools of the College — courses that are funda- 
mental in the sense that the utility of critical inquiry and the nature of 
faith are stressed and related to student experience. 

Creeds and metaphysical issues persist in human affairs because a 
sense of immediate direction in daily living, and something of rational 
explanation of existence, are abiding human needs. 

In matters religious and philosophical, no universally acceptable final 
answer has yet been achieved. It is imperative, therefore, that able and 
systematic and free examination of creedal beliefs and metaphysical 
assumptions in all areas of man's life be vigorously and unceasingly 
continued. By this means faith can be kept vital, insidious provincialism 
thwarted, and the significant intellectual achievements of the past and 
present conserved and advanced. 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion has no monopoly on these 
things; however, it is especially dedicated to the task of reminding, 
should others forget. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION _ _ _ 

Professor Paul H. Derr, Head of the Department 
Professor J. F. MiLLER 
Associate Professor W. E. SMITH 

Assistant Professors J. B. Edwards, Jr., H. Keating, J. F. Kenfield 
Instructors H. O. Floyd, Jr., A. HocH, W. R. Leonhardt, J. H. Little, 
F. J. Murray, W. Sonner 

The purpose of the Department of Physical Education is to make a 
maximum contribution to the general welfare of the student by providing 
programs and conditions in which he may develop and maintain physical 
strength and stamina, relax tensions, acquire an appreciation for the 
impoi'tance of healthful living, and develop knowledge and skills for 
recreation. The programs also provide situations in which the student 
may develop qualities of cooperation, leadership, and social poise. 

To achieve these aims, the department serves two functions: it provides 
instruction and supeivision for the participant in physical education in 
regular classes; and it offers opportunities for all students to participate 
in beneficial forms of physical exercise through the program in intra- 
mural athletics, which is administered by the department. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL STUDIES- — — _ _ 



Professnr GE(»P(;e A. Gullettk. Head of the Depart nietit 

Professors C. I. FOSTER, A. K. F. McKeon 

Associate Professors E. M. Halliday. J. R. LAMBERT, jR. 

Assistant Professors P. A. BREDENBERG, H. Collins 

Instructors J. L. CoLE, R. N. Elliott, F. R. Place, S. Venturella 

The Department of Social Studies draws its staff from the various 
fields of the humanities and the social sciences. It contributes to the train- 
ing of men whose professional competence is devoted to the public 
interest by offering courses especially designed to emphasize the close 
interconnections that bind liberal studies to the world of science and 
technology. 

150 



TEXTILES 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 
— — — AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



I'mfcssor Sankokh K. Winston, Hctiil of the Dvintrt iiuiit 
Associate I'rofcssor E. H. JoHNSON 
Assistant I'rofcssor H. D. Rawls 
Instractor Margery Clark 

Courses offered by the ilei)artnu'nt fall into three overla|)pin>; areas: 
(1) courses concerned with the jit'neral education of the student; (2) 
supporting courses in those curricula in which a knowledKe of society 
and human behavior is (ieemed esential; and (.{) courses jriven in con- 
junction with other departments which help prepare the student for 
lather specific types of professional activity upon y:raduation. 

The general objective of courses in the department is to encourag:e the 
student as a citizen and as a professional person to see himself as a part 
of his society. It is believed that the student must understand something 
of the characteristics and functioninji- f^roup behavior within the urban- 
industrial milieu of western civilization. He is shown that the human 
beinji- operates within a social world which is the result of lon^ cultural 
development: and he is encouraued to see his relationship within the 
framework of society with the result that he conceives of his behavior 
as a part of a larger social framewoik. The importance of adjustment 
to life is emphasized in all classroom teaching as well as in conferences 
on individual problems. 



SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 



MALCOLM E. CAMPBELL, DEAN 



INTRODUCTORY 



Food, clothing, and sh.elter are recognized as the three basic needs of 
man, and as a corollary of this fact the manufacture of textiles has 
become one of the world's leading industries. From early beginnings as 
an occupation governed by tradition and rule of thumb the textile in- 
dustry has advanced to a highly complex, technical stage. North Carolina 
has risen steadily with the giowth of textiles until it now ranks first in 
the nation in terms of employment and manufacture i products. There 
are at present more than 1»0() textile plants located throughout the state 
producing a variety of commodities ranging from coarse cotton yarns 
and fabrics to the finest of laces and wearing apparel, fiom experimental 
synthetic fibers to finished fabrics woven of these man-made yarns. The 
current trend indicates that constant research an dthe application of its 
results are continuing to attract more maunfacturers to the state along 
with even more diversified phases of the textile industry. 

Because of the tremendous expansion in the scope of textiles it has 
become necessary to utilize the talents of the chemist, the physicist, the 
engineer, the businessman, as well as the traditional weaver, spinner, 
and dyer. The field of textiles, although as old as man hinuself, has all 

151 



TEXTILES 



the vigor of a young industry; and because it encompasses such a di- 
versity of activitiy, offers limitless opportunity to a man whatever his 
specific int'.rest may be. 

The School of Textiles offers technical instruction, both undergraduate 
and graduate, in the applied sciences underlying the production and 
finishing of textile products. Textile research, which is an important 
function in its operation, supplements and supports graduate study 
through applied and fundamental investigations. 

The purpose of the School is fourfold: to educate men and women for 
professional service in all phases of the textile industry; to develop their 
capacities for intelligent leadership; to aid in the economic development 
of the textile industry; and to cooperate with the textile industry in im- 
proving, through scientific research, manufacturing efficiency and the 
quality and value of manufactured products. 

For Administration, the School of Textiles is organized into five de- 
partments: 

Professor E. B. Grover FIBER AND YARN TECHNOLOGY 

Professor W. E. Shinn KNITTING TECHNOLOGY 

Professor B. L. Whittier FABRIC DEVELOPMENT 

Professor H. A. Rutherford TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 
Professor W. A. Newell TEXTILE RESEARCH 

Curricula 

Two four-year curricula. Textile Technology and Textile Chemistry, 
are offered. The freshman program is identical in each. Seven options in 
the Textile curriculum enable a student to specialize in some particular 
phase of textiles. Each option includes 20 semester credits in related 
courses. The options, which ai'e listed following the curriculum, are: 
General Textiles Technology, Textile Management, Yarn Manufacture, 
Weaving and Designing, Knitting, Synthetics, Quality Control. 

Selected courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Textiles 
are offered to graduates of universities and standard colleges. These are 
arranged in accordance with the professional aim of the student and the 
credits presented. If the student presents enough acceptable credits for 
courses required in a curriculum, he may be graduated with a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Textiles in one year. It should not take more than 
two years plus one or two summer schools to complete work for a degree. 

A minimum of 160 semester credit hours, and net quality points equiva- 
lent to the number of credit hours earned, are required for graduation. 
Degrees 

Upon the completion of any of the options in Textile Technology, the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Textiles is conferred. Upon the com- 
pletion of the curriculum in Textile Chemistry, the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Textile Chemistry is conferred. 

The degree of Master of Science in Textiles or of Master of Science 
in Textile Chemistry is offered for the satisfactory completion of one 
year of graduate study in residence. Candidates for the degree of Master 
of Science enter and are enrolled in the Graduate School of the College. 
For general requirements, consult The Graduate School Catalog. 

FACILITIES — — — — __ _________ 

The Textile Building, erected in 19."^) and greatly enlarged in 1950, was 
designed to harmonize teaching and laboratory facilities. It houses one 
of the most modern and best-equipped textile institutions in the world. 

OPPORTUNITIES — — — __ _________ 

Technological advances in textile fibers and manufacturing techniques 
have created a tremendous demand for men technically trained in textile 
colleges. For the past several years, the School of Textiles has had a 
demand for graduates greater than it could supply. Its graduates have 
entered the textile industry at salaries equal to or better than those 
offered in many other industries. 

152 



TEXTILES 



Graduates of the School are equipped to enter many fields related to 
textiles, such as niaiuifacturinn-, sales, or research; and alumni of the 
School hold responsible positions in each of these fields. Many are now 
mill presidents or general mana^i'is. 

Some of the specific fields available are: production of yarns. ])roduc- 
tion of woven and knitted fabrics, dyeinn- and finishing, industrial en^i- 
neerinjr, quality control, desijinin^r, styling, merchandising, converting, 
research, cost and production control sales of equipment and materials 
to the textile industry. 

To assist in the placement of students and alumni and to facilitate 
interviews by textile firms, the School maintains a full-time Placement 
Director. 

— — — — — — — — — — ___ INSPECTION TRIPS 

For certain of the textile courses offered, it is deemed advantageous 
for the student to see the manufacturing process under actual operating 
conditions. Therefore, when possible, trins are arranged for student 
groups to visit outstanding manufacturing i)lants. When so arranged, 
such trips are compulsory; transportation costs and other travel ex- 
penses, while held to a minimum insofar as possible, must be paid by the 
student. 

— — — — — — — — — — ___ —SHORT COURSES 

It is the policy of the School to offer short course training for textile 
mill men who have a limited amount of time to spend at the School. These 
courses can be offered when a demand for them exists. The subject matter 
is selected to meet the needs of the group. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — -EXTENSION COURSES 

The staff of the School cooperates with the Extension Division of the 
College in offering textile courses by correspondence to employees of 
textile mills who wish to engage in this type of study. Applications for 
enrollment in these courses should be mailed direct to Edward \V. 
Ruggles, Director, College Extension Division, State College Station, 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 

— — — — — — FIBER AND YARN TECHNOLOGY 



Professor Elliot B. GR()\ER. Head of the Diijurtntcut 

Professor D. S. Hamby 

Assistaut Professors J. S. Parker, W. E. Smith. ,I. E. Pardle 

Instructor W. C. Stuckey. ,Jr. 

Laboratory Technician BARBARA S. Gast 

_ — ____ — __ ______ OBJECTIVES 

The purpose of this Department is to instruct in the theory and practice 
of producing yarns; to conduct experimental processing in the utiliza- 
tion of cotton, wool, and the various synthetic fibers, and combinations 
of these; to study the engineering aspects of the machinery involved; 
and to cooperate with mills in solving manufacturing problems through 
research and experimentation. 

— — — — — — — — — — — ____ FACILITIES 

OPENING AND PICKING 
The opening and picking equipment, located in a sei)arate humidified 
laboratory, consists of two lines of equipment: a completely coordinated 
line consisting of blending feeders, openers, and a one-process picker, 
arranged to allow full scale production with by passes provided for man- 
made staple fibers and experimental work; and individual breaker and 
finisher pickers for processing samples. 

153 



TEXTILES 



CARDING SECTION 

A laboratory equipped for carding, combing, drawing, and related pro- 
cesses is located in one larye humidified laboratory. The machinery 
consists of different types of cards, rejiular and controlled draft drawing, 
and combing machinery suitable for processing a wide range of materials 
from cai'ded cotton to synthetics and wool on the cotton system. 

ROVING SECTION 

A complete group of roving frames, including conventional as well as 
controlled or long draft types is located in another laboratory. 

YARN SECTION 

The yarn section laboratory contains equipment for spinning, twisting, 
and winding. In order to conserve room and to have as many types of 
equipment as possible, the machinery in this section has been built in 
shorter-than-standard lengths, but it is complete in every other respect. 
Practically all industrial types of drafting are represented, both in dem- 
onstration units and operating equipment. Sample installations are avail- 
able of overhead cleaning, Pneumafil, roll buffing, different types of 
spindles, and of many other modern developments. Included in the de- 
partment also are several types of twisters and many of the standard 
types of winders to wind skeins, cones, dye packages, or tubes. 

RESEARCH LABORATORIES 

Three separate laboratories for applied research in fiber processing 
are located in the yarn department. These are described in the section 
under Physical Testing Laboratories. 

CONTINUOUS FILAMENT LABORATORY 

A laboratory completely equipped for the processing of continuous 
filament synthetic yarns from soaking through winding is enclosed in 
another separate humidified room. This laboratory has the complete 
range of equipment necessary for the processing of crepe, voile, and 
hosiery yarn and includes: soaking tub, extractor, dryer, twist-setting 
oven, spooler, upstroke twisters, double twister, quill winder, cone 
winders, and nylon sizing machine, plus supplementary equipment. 

WOOL SECTION 

An entirely new laboratory has been set up for the processing of wool 
and long-staple synthetic fibers and blends. Included in the equipment is 
a Davis and Furber Wool Unit, complete from machinery to handle 
blending through the warping of the spun yarn. A Warner and Swasey 
Pin Drafter has recently been added, and the addition of other modern 
equipment is being planned. Courses in processing wool are included in 
the curricula. 

PHYSICAL TESTING LABORATORIES 

There are th'ee separate air-conditioned laboratories, one of which is 
used for teaching and undergraduate student work and another for in- 
dustrial research and graduate student research. The third laboratory, 
which has a separate air-conditioning unit, is used for fundamental and 
applied research where it is necessary to have atmospheric conditions 
varying from the standard. 

The laboratories are equipped for the physical testing of fibers, yarns, 
and fabrics. Included in the laboratory cquii)ment are the following: a 
complete range of fiber testing equipment, two Instron Testers, several 
torsion and other types of balances, several combination skein and fabric 
bi-eaking machines, inclined plane testers, single strand i)endulum testers, 
Moscrop multiple single strand testers, bursting strength testers, drying 
ovens, abrasion machines, twist testers, densometers, hydrostatic pres- 
sure tester, automatic reels, permeability testers, evenness testers, and 

154 



TEXTILES 



many other typos of laboratory equipment, includinK both commercial 
and special instruments developed at the school. 

The portion in Yarn Manufacture is listed with the other options 



KNITTING TECHNOLOGY 



f'n.fessor WiLLlAM E. Shinn, Head of the Depiirtmeut 
Associate Frofessvr J. G. Lewis 
Assistant Professor H. M. Middleton, Jr. 

~~~~~~ — — — — — — — — — OBJECTIVES 

In recognition of the sreat importance of knittinjr and the other needle 
arts m the industrial life of this section, a Department of Knitting has 
been set up with the objective of making available to this branch of the 
textile industry personnel more adequately trained in the fundamentals 
and practices underlying the production of knitted textiles. 

~Ti,~iT ~7 ~ T r~ ,~ ~ — — — — — — FACILITIES 

The laboratories of the Knitting Technology Department, organized 
and equipped for instruction in many phases of the knit-iroods industrv 
are grouped as follows: " • ' 

SEAMLESS HOSIERY 

Equipment for instruction in seamless hosiery production includes 
representative types of machines arranged in two groups The more 
e ementary types, including ribbers and plain hosierv machines with the 
elementary attachments such as stripers, reverse plating and rubber top 
attachments, are arranged together for beginning students The more 
advanced types are grouped together for advanced students. This line 
includes advanced rib type machines, Komets, Banner Wrap Reverse 
several types of float stitch machines, and machines for the manufacture 
ol hosiery with ornamental wrap patterns. 

NYLON HOSIERY 

This section is equipped with three full-fashioned hosierv knitting 
machines of modern types, in 45-gauge, 51 -gauge, and 54-gauge respec- 
tively. There is provided also a 400-needle women's nvlon hosierv ma- 
chine of the circular type. This equipment forms the basis for instruction 
in the general course in hosiery manufacture and for the more advanced 
instruction in full fashioned hosiery production. Equipment for the loop- 
ing and seaming of hosiery, for preboarding, dyeing, and finishing of fine 
hosiery is provided in separate rooms. 

CIRCULAR KNITWEAR 

A wide assortament of large diameter fabric knitting machines is pro- 
vided for demonstration and instruction in the production of cloth for 
both underwear and outerwear. This group includes both latch needle 
and spring needle types for jersey, rib. interlock, and Jacquard fabric. 

GARMENT CUTTING AND SEAMING 

A laboratory for experimental garment design and manufacture his 
been set up with modern power cutting equipment and manv types of 
industrial sewing machines for producing garments for both 'outerwear 
and underwear. This unit is supplemented by knit goods finishing equip- 
ment located in the hosiery and knitwear finishing laboratory. 

WARP KNITTING, FLAT KNITTING 

The knitting department laboratories include five warp knitting ma- 
chines of the tricot and raschel types. These machines furnish the basis 
for instruction in the design, analysis, and production of a wide rantre 
of warp knitted fabrics. A collection of fabrics and several winding and 
warp preparation machines make it possible to process a wide variety of 

155 



TEXTILES 

materials. Flat machines of the V-bed and links-and-links type are em- 
ployed for instruction in the production of heavier knitwear such as 
sweaters. 

KNIT GOODS FINISHING 

i)i'V()ic;l eHLiiely to experimental work in hosiery and knit ji'oods 
finishing:, this laboratory contains modern equipment for pre-boarding, 
(lyeinjj- and finishing; machinery, a knit goods calender for finishing 
knitted tubing, a fabric brush, and an experimental warp sizing machine 
for the preparation of warp yarns for tricot knitting. 

The option in Knitting- Technology is listed with other options. 

FABRIC DEVELOPMENT— ________ 



Professor Benja.min L. Whittier, Head of the Department 
Associate Professors J. A. Porter, Jr.. W. E. Moser 
Assistant Professors J. B. Gaither, E. B. Berry, J. W. Klibbe 

OBJECTIVES— _____ _________ 

The purpose of this Department is to instruct students in the theory 
and practice of weaving and designing fabrics ranging from simple print 
cloths and elaborate leno and jacquard creations; to cooperate with the 
home economics departments of North Carolina colleges in creating con- 
sumer interest in textile products; to cooperate with mills in solving 
manufacturing problems through research and experimentation. 

FACILITIES _ _____ _________ 

WEAVING LABORATORIES 

These laboratories contain a larger variety of looms than can be found 
in a textile mill, carefully selected so that the student may obtain knowl- 
edge of the different looms made in the United States. On this equipment 
are produced all types of fabi'ics, including print cloths, denims, sateens, 
ginghams, fancy shirting, dobby weave dress and drapery materials, pile, 
leno, and jacquard fabrics, woven from natural and synthetic fibers. The 
weave room is completely humidified. 
WARP PREPARATION 

Tlu' equipment for preparing yarn for weaving is located in a sepa- 
rate depaitment. This equipment includes a modern high speed warper 
and a rayon type slasher as well as auxiliary equipment such as skein, 
cone, and filling winders. There is also a silk type combination warper 
and beamer used for making short warps for student instruction. There 
is a separate room for drawing in warps. 

DESIGNING AND FABRIC ANALYSIS 

Full design board equipment for both single and double cloths is pro- 
vided in the classrooms. In addition to dies for cutting samples, different 
makes of balances and microscopes are provided for the analysis of 
fabrics. Other designing equipment includes an enlarging camera, card 
cutting pianos, and card lacing equipment. 
CLOTH INSPECTION 

Separate facilities are provided where students can learn the technique 
of grading woven materials, using completely modern inspection equip- 
ment. 

The option in Weaving and Designing is listed with the other options. 

TEXTILE CHEMISTRY _________ 



Professor Henry A. Rutherford, Head <,f the Department 
Professor K. S. Campbell 
Associate Professor A. C. HAYES 
\'isiting Professor R. W. JACOBY 

156 



TEXTILES 



— — — — — — — — — __ — __— OBJECTIVES 

The purpose of this Department is to instruct students in the chemis- 
try of natural and synthetic fibers, and in the theory and practice of 
scouring-, bleaching-, dyeing, finishing, and printinjr of yarns and fabrics; 
to conduct laboratory experimental work demonstrating" the principles 
set forth in lecture i)eriods; to cooperate with the mills of the state in 
solvinir problems relating to the wet processing; of textile materials. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — __ CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in Textile Chemistry is listed with the other Textile 
curricula. Chancres in the requirements for students selecting this cur- 
riculum may be anticipated from time to time in order that the academic 
training- may be kept abreast of modern developments in the application 
of chemistry to textile materials. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — FACILITIES 

DYEING LABORATORY 

This is a complete laboratory, modern in every respect, with u'*^'nerous 
provision for bench space, equipment storage facilities, utilities, and steam 
baths. It is used for all laboratory work dealing with chemical proi)erties 
of textiles, dye synthesis, color matching, and all types of dyeing. 

DYE HOUSE 

In this room is assembled one of the finest groups of dyeing and finish- 
ing machinery for instructional and experimental purposes in existence 
anywhere. Obtained over the last three or four years at a cost of over 
$150,000, the equipment includes a singeing machine, a continuous dyeing- 
range of the pad-steam type, a Williams unit, a du Pont-type contin- 
uous bleaching unit, four package dyeing machines, a dye beck, dye jig, 
rotary hosiery dyeing machine, and piece goods dyeing and finishing- units 
utilizing dry cans, and enclosed tenter frame, and a continuous loop drying 
and curing unit supplied with both steam and gas-fired heat sources. 

MICROSCOPY 

Excellent facilities are available for work in textile microscopy. Tlie 
laboratory contains the most modern instruments including micioscopes, 
cross sectioning devices, and equipment for photomicrography. In addition 
to the ordinary monocular microscope, binocular and polarizing: types are 
available. The dark room contains everything: needed for photographic 
work. 

RESEARCH AND TEXTILE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS 

Two laboratories equipped for cliemical lesearch on fibei-s and on textile 
chemical specialties are available for use by advanced undi'rgraduate stu- 
dents working: on special problems and for research. Equii)ment includes 
a reflectometer, a spectrophotometer with all supplementary apparatus, 
colorimeters, and the common testing equipment used for evaluation and 
for determining color-fastness, washfastness, etc., of dyed fibers and 
fabrics. 

— — — — — — — — — — TEXTILE RESEARCH 



Professor William Andrews Newell, Research Coordinator 
Professor J. F. Bor.DAN, Director of Processing Research 
Professor H. A. Kl'TIIKRKoRn, Director, Chemical Research 
Professor D. M Gates, Assistant Director, Chemical Research 

_ — _ — — ___——_____ OBJECTIVES 
Through financial assistance extended by the North Carolina Textile 
Foundation, a program of research has been initiated that is far-ieachinp: 
in its influence on the operations and development of the textile industry 
in North Carolina and in the nation. 

157 



TEXTILES 



The scope of this research embraces applied and fundamental investiga- 
tions in the fields of fibei, yarns, fabrics, textile chemistry, fabrication, 
machinery. 

Research is carried out by a full-time research staff, trained in the 
physical sciences, with the assistance of department heads and the mem- 
hevs of the teaching staff. 

FACILITIES — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 

Equipment for processing- and chemical research is available in eight 
laboratories, four of which are devoted entirely to research. In addition, 
equipment used for instruction can also be employed if needed. Complete 
spinning units are available for manufacture of yarns on the cotton, 
woolen, and worsted systems. 

The research department also carries out the training of students on 
both undergraduate and graduate levels by providing direct participation 
in the instructional program and by furnishing part-time employment 
to these students. 

SYNTHETIC FIBERS DIVISION __ — — — _ — 



OBJECTIVES — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 

The purpose of this Division is to acquaint students with the various 
types of synthetic yarns and to instruct in the basic properties, handling 
methods, and conversion into representative end products of each. The 
Division acts in conjunction with the Knitting, Technology, Fiber and 
Yarn Technology, Fabric Development, Textile Chemistry, and Research 
Departments of the School of Textiles to provide a broad groundwork in 
synthetic yarn fundamentals. 

FACILITIES — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 

Laboratories are coordinated with and are a part of the laboratories 
of the Depaitments of Fiber and Yarn Technology, Fabric Development, 
and Knitting Technology. 

The option in Synthetics is listed with the other options. 

MACHINE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT— _ _ _ _ 



C. M. ASBILL, Jr., Head of Depart nicut 
C. E. Cox, Toolmaker 
J. C. Groff, Equipment Custodiayt 
J. C. Edwards, EqiiipDioit Ciistoflifni 

OBJECTIVES — — — — — —— — — — — — — — — 

The purposes of this department are: 

To develop new types of textile machinery and to improve existing 
types. 

To keep abreast of modern developments in machines and testing 
equipment by a digest of patents and technical articles in the various 
textile publications, as well as by close contacts with mills and machine 
manufacturers. 

To furnish engineering assistance and advice i-elating to patents to 
individuals and organizations interested in the design or development of 
textile machines or related apparatus. 

To place within reach of and at the disposal of interested students 
and the teaching and research staff of the School of Textiles the facili- 
ties of a qualified textile engineering department with means for the 
construction and testing of new and improved equipment. 

158 



TEXTILES 



— — — — — — — — — ______ FACILITIES 

The facilities consist of desinn and draftinj;: equipment toj>:ethei- with a 
completely eciuipped machine shop for the production of both laru"e pro- 
duction machines and smaller ami more delicate testinji' apparatus. 

The establishment of this Department within the School of Textiles 
was made jiossible by the financial assistance of the North Carolina 
Textile Foundation. Its functions extend to all phases of textile manufac- 
turing- and processing, includinn- both the mechanical and electrical fields. 
Patents will be secured on all worthwhile developments and administered 
in accordance with the Patent Policy of the CoUeyre. 

— — — — — — — — — — TEXTILE LIBRARY 

Katherine McDiarmid, Libra nit II 

As a result of a substantial ^ift by the Burlington Mills Corporation, 
the Textile Library was relocated in the Textile Building- in 1J>51. The 
new. enlarjied quarters were designed to incorporate the latest functional 
improvements. 

The library was organized in 1944; in 1945 the entire textile collection 
from the D. H. Hill Library was added to it. There are now about 4.500 
volumes, of which 2,000 are bound periodicals. The library subscribes to 
120 current periodicals, both American and foreign, which are thoroughly 
indexed in Industrial Arts Index, Chemical Abstracts, Natural and Syn- 
thetic Fibers, and Textile Technology Digest. 

In addition to books and periodicals, the librarian and student assistants 
maintain files of pamphlets, reprints, trade catalogs, and patents. Special 
card indexes have been piepared for these collections. 

The holdings of the Textile Library are available on loan not only to 
students and faculty of the College but also to researcii workers and in- 
dustry employees throughout North Carolina. 

— — — — — — — — — CONSULTING SERVICE 

George H. Dunlap, Textile C(»isiilt(tiit 

In recognition of the need for close contact with the textile mills this 
division was organized with the assistance of the North Carolina Textile 
Foundation. It is the function of the Textile Consultant to visit as many 
mills as possible during the year, to discuss with executives their tech- 
nical problems, and assist in their solution. In many cases this involves 
experimental work which may be conductefl in the mill or brought to 
the School for consultation with the staff or for special work in the 
laboiatoiies. 

The Textile Consultant frequently cooperates with the officials of trade 
associations in planning and arranging programs and represents the 
School at these meetings. 

— — — — — — — TEXTILE PLACEMENT BUREAU 

CeoRCE H. DL'.NLAI', Direetur 

The Placement Bureau is a clearing house for students in the gradu- 
ating class and for textile alumni. It is a coordinating agencv for the 
employer and the graduates of the School of Textiles. The Placement 
Bureau tries to keep an accurate file of all textile alumni and the pro- 
gress they have made. Therefore, all alumni are lequested to notif.v 
the Director when they receive a promotion or transfer fi-om ojie organ- 
ization to another. 

— — — — — — — -SPONSORED PROFESSORSHIPS 

Four sponsored professorships are now in ttVei i in the Schodl of Tex- 
tiles. These are made possible by funds contributed to the North Caro- 
lina Textile Foundation. Inc., and especially designated to pay a part 
of the annual salary of the Professor selected to fill the position. 

159 



TEXTILES 

The four professorships, together with the year of establishment 
and the name of the incumbent for each, are as follows: 

Burlington Industries Professorship of Textiles 1946. 

Dame S. Hamby, P)<)t'essor of Textiles, Department of Fiber and Yarn 

Technologij 
Edgar and Emily Hesslein Professorship of Fabric Development 1948. 
Benjamin Lincoln Whittier, Professor of Textiles awrf Head, Depart- 
)ne)it of Fabric Department. 

Chester H. Roth Professorship of Knitting Technology 1948. 
William Edward Shinn, Professor of Textiles and Head, Department 
of Knitting Technology. 

Abel C. Linebergei- Professorship of Yarn Manufacturing 1948. 
Elliott Brow.n Grover, Professor of Textiles and Head, Dei>artment 
of Fiber and Ya))i Technologt/. 



CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY 



FOR ALL TEXTILE STUDENTS 

I CH 101 General Inorganic Chemistry 

CH 103 General and Qualitative Chemistry 

ENG 111, 112 Composition 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 

MA 112 Analytical Geometry and Calculus A 

ME 101 Engineering Graphics 

PS 201 The .\merican Governmental System 

TX 101 Yarn Principles 

TX 151 Fabric Principles 

MS 101, 102 Military Science I or 

or* 

AS 121, 122 Air Science I 

PE 101, 102 Physical Education* 



Credits 



4 








4 


3 


3 


4 








4 


2 








3 


2 











2 


2 


1 


1 



18 



19 



FOR ALL EXCEPT TEXTILE CHEMISTRY STUDENTS 

O EC 201, 202 Economics 

^ HI 252 The United States Since 1865 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 

TX 201 Yarn Manufacture II 

TX 241 Knitting I 

TX 251 Weaving II 

TX 261 Fabric Structure 

TX 281 Fiber Quality 

TC 201 Textile Chemistry I 

MS 201, 202 Military Science 11 or 

or* 

AS 221, 222 Air Science II 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education* 



3 


3 


3 





4 


4 


4 








3 


3 








3 





3 





2 


2 


2 


1 


1 



EC 401, 402 Principles of Accounting 
PSY 200, 337 Introduction to Psychology 
MA 211, 212 chology I or Calculus 
EC 425 Industrial Management 



or 








Industrial 


Psy- 










3 


3 






3 


3 



160 






3 


3 


3 





4 


3 








2 


3 








3 



TEXTILES 

Credits 
EC 426 Personnel Manapement 

Knjrlish'* 
TX 301 Yarn Manufacture III 

TX 323 Textile Testing II 

TX 311 Hosiery Manufacture 

TX 351 Weaving: III 

TX 361 Dobby Design and Analysis 1 

Elect ives 4 4 

Students excused from Military or Air Science and ur Physical Education will 
schedule e<iuivalent credits in coui-ses from the followinK departments : Economics. 
Psycholojty. Rural SocioloRy. Social Studies, or SocioloKV. 

If approved in advance by the Director of Instruction, students who averasre C or 
Ent;lish. History ami Political Science. Modern I.anKuattes, Philosophy and ReliKJon. 
above on Composition. EnK. 111. 112. may substitute 6 creilits of Modern Lan^uaKe. 



4 TX 483 Textile Cost Methods^ - 2 

TX 484 .Mill Ortranization 3 

TX 581 Instrumentation and Control 3 

TC 301, 302 Textile Chemistry II 3 3 

TX 425 Textile Microscopy 1 

Selected Option: 

(20 credits in (ieneral Textiles. Textile 

Management, ^ am .Manufacturing, 

Weavinjj and Designing, Knitting 

Technology, Synthetics or Quality 

Control) See Options 10 10 

Fllectives 3 3 

21 20 

••• Students in Management Option will substitute an approved textile coursi-. 

_______________ OPTIONS 

GENERAL TEXTILES OPTION 

TX 373 Fabric Technology 2 

TX 401 Yarn .Manufacture IV 4 

TX 411 Wool .Manufacture 3 

TX 431 Synthetics I 2 

TX 451 Weaving Laboratory IV 1 

TX 161 Dobby Design and Analysis II 3 

Textile Courses '' 5 

10 10 
TEXTILE MANAGEMENT 

EC 111. 112 .Marketing .Methods and Sales Management 3 3 

EC 504, 505 Principles of Cost .Accounting 3 3 

Textile Courses 4 4 



10 10 



YARN MANUFACTURE 

TX 101 Yarn Manulacture IV 

TX 402 .Mill Technology 

TX 411 Wool .Manufacture 

TX 431 Synthetics I 

TX 4.35 Synthetic Fiber Processing 
'Textile Courses**** 



4 








3 





3 


2 








4 


4 






10 10 

161 



TEXTILES 



WEAVING AND DESIGNING 

TX 373 Fabric Technology 

TX 431 Synthetics I 

TX 451. 452 Weaving IV, V 

TX 461 Dobby Design and Analysis II 

TX 561 Dobby Design and Analysis III 

TX 562 .lacquard Design and Weaving 
Textile Courses'*'"'-' 



Credits 



2 





2 





1 


2 


3 








2 





3 


2 


3 



10 



10 



KNITTING TECHNOLOGY OPTION 



TX 343 

TX 441 

TX 443 

TX 444 

TX 445 

TX 447, 

TX 449 



448 



SYNTHETICS OPTION 

TX 402 
TX 433 
TX 435 
TX 476 
TC 421 



Knitted Fabric Design and Analysis 

Flat Knitting 

Knitting Mechanics 

Garment Manufacture 

Full F'ashioned Hosiery Manufacture 

Knitting Laboratory II 

Tricot Knitting 



Mill Technology 

Synthetics II 

Synthetic Fiber Processing 

Synthetics III 

Fabric Finishing I 



2 





3 





3 








3 





2 


2 


2 





3 



10 



10 



Textile Courses**** 






3 


4 








4 





3 


2 





4 






QUALITY CONTROL OPTION 

ST 361 Introduction to Statistics for Engineers 

TX 424 Development Project 

TX 521 Testing and Quality Control 

TX 522 Textile Testing III 

Textile Courses**'"-' 



10 



10 



3 








2 


4 





3 


4 


3 


4 



•*** Calculus 211. 212 may be substituted for elective coui-ses. 



10 



10 



CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY— _ _ _ 

The freshman year is the same as for the Textile Curriculum* 

CH 211, 212 Quantitative Analysis 
O HI 252 The I nited States Since 1865 

^ MA 211, 212 Calculus 

PY 211, 212 General Physics 
English Elective 

TX 261 Fabric Structure 

TX 284 Textile Processing 

MS 201, 202** Military Science 
or or 

AS 221, 222 Air Science 

PE 201, 202 Physical Education 



Credits 



4 


4 


3 





3 


3 


4 


4 


3 








3 


4 





2 


2 


1 


1 


24 


17 



162 



TEXTILES 



Credits 

I ("H 121. 122 Organic Chemistry 5 5 

KC 201, 202 Ikonomics 3 3 

KNG 321 Scientilic Writin); 3 

ENG 231 Masic Speaking Skills 3 

TX 321 Textile Testing I 3 

TC 303. 301 Textile Chemistry III 4 4 

TX 12.T Textile Microscopy 1 

l-'Iectives 3 5 

21 21 

I EC 425 Industrial Management 3 

EC 426 Personnel Manajjement 3 

TX 581 Instrumentation and Control 3 

TC 403. 404 Textile ( hemistrv IV 4 4 

TC 423 Fabric Finishing II 3 

TC 431 Textile l'rintin>r 3 

TC 511, 512 Chemistry of Fibers 2 2 

Physical Science. Mathematics or 

Textile Courses 3 4 

Electives 3 3 

21 19 

Exceut that PS 2(11 replaces the secoml semester of En({ineerin>r DrawinK iME 102 1. 
Students excused from Military or Air Science antl or Physical Education will sche«lule 
eiiuivalent credits in courses from the foUowinK departments : Ecnomics. English. 
History and Political Science. Modern LanKua^es. Philosophy and ReliRion. Psychology, 
Rural SocioloBy. Social Studies, or SocioloKy. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

_ — — — _— STATE COLLEGE DIVISION 



William Wmatley Pierson, Jr., Dvati, Chain I Hill 
Donald Benton Anderson. Asxun-iutt Dean, Raleigh 

The Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North Carolina 
is composed of three divisions, one at each of the three units of the 
University System. It is administered by the Graduate Dean, the three 
Associate Deans, and a Graduate Council composed of representatives 
of each of the units. 

At State College, jrraduate instruction is oflFered in the fields of Agri- 
culture, EnKineeiin^r. Forestry, Technological Education, and Textiles. 
The dejrree of Master of Science is offered in each of these areas. The 
Professional Master's Degree also offered in some of these fields is in- 
tended for students who are interested in the more advanced applications 
of fundamental principles to specialized fields rather than in the acquisi- 
tion of the broader background in advanced scientific studies which 
would fit tlicm for careers in research. 

163 



COLLEGE EXTENSION 



The desree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the following: fields of 
study: 

Auricultural Economics 

Animal Industry 

Botany (in the fields of physiolopy and ecology) 

Ceramic Kngineerinjr 

Chemical Knjjineering 

Klectrical Engineering 

Engineering Physics 

Entomology 

?"xperimental Statistics 

Field Crops 

Forestry 

Genetics 

Nuclear Engineering 

Plant Pathology 

Rural Sociology 

Soils 

Zoology (in the fields of ecology and wildlife management) 

Students interested in graduate study should consult the Graduate 
School catalog. A copy will be sent upon request. Inquiries should be 
addressed to: 

Associate Dean, GRADUATE School, North Carolina State College, Ra- 
leigh, North Carolina. 



COLLEGE EXTENSION DIVISION 

Edward W. Ruggles, Director 

OBJECTIVES — — — — — ——______ — _ 

The College Extension Division is organized to carry the practical and 
cultural advantages of college studies to pei'sons who cannot attend 
classes on the campus, and to groups and communities which may profit 
by the services offered. 



SERVICES ______ _________ 

Extension courses are organized where at least fifteen persons are 
interested and are willing to take up the same subject. In setting up the 
courses, such matters as distance from the college, nature of the subject, 
and availability of instructors must be taken into consideration. 

Correspondence courses foi college credit are offered in Psychology, 
Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, Poultry, Agricultural Economics, Rural 
Sociology, Education, Economics, English, Geology, History, Architec- 
ture, Ceramic Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, Mathematics, Modern Languages. Sociology, Statistics, Social Stud- 
ies, Safety. The list is being steadily increased. 

Correspondence courses which do not carry credit and which are de- 
signed to stress practical application of the subject matter offered are 
provided in Mathematics, Land Surveying, Engineering Drawing, Build- 
ing and Estimating, Industrial Statistics and Quality Control, Poultry, 
Vegetable Gardening, and Ceramic Engineering. 

Short courses of a practical nature are offered every year by the Divi- 
sion to link the facilities of the several Schools at State College with the 
trades and industries of North Carolina in a permanent educational 

164 



COLLEGE EXTENSION 



program. These short courses are increasinjr in popularity. During the 
present school year the following short courses and institutes are 
scheduled: 

Electrical Meters Engineers, Surveyors, Gas-Plant Operators, Dry 
Kiln Operators, Beef Cattle Conference, Dairy Conference, Statistical 
(Quality Cojitrol, Furniture Finishing, Sawmill Operators, Grain Market- 
ing, Farm Income Tax, Salt Water Sports Fishing Institute, Pest Con- 
trol Operators, Water Works School. Industrial Waste Conference 
Personnel Testing Institute, Industrial Management. Industrial Safety, 
Motion and Time Study, Job Evaluation, Introduction to Quality Control, 
Industrial Relations, Seedmen's Schools, Pesticide School, Farm Mana- 
gers, Freezer Locker Operators, Cotton Classing, Lumber Grading, 
Aerial Photo Interpretation, Commercial Flower Growers School, Beef 
Production, Slate Garden. Schools, Dairy Production, Diary Manufactur- 
ing, Nurserymen's School, Artificial Breeding, Field Crops Production, 
Dairy Herd Testing. Radio. Nutrition School, Fresh Water Sports Fish- 
ing institute. Retail Building Supply Marketing Institute, Quality Con- 
crete Conference, Personnel Testing Institute — Introductory and Ad- 
vanced, Interviewing and Counseling, Management Psychology, Personnel 
Research, N. C. Press Association Mechanical Conference, Industry 
Research Conference, Brick and Tile Institute, and a Safety School. 
Additional courses are offered as the demand arises. 

The Gaston Technical Institute at Gastonia. N. C, offers four one-year 
terminal technical courses; Radio and Television Technology, Electrical 
Technology, Internal Combustion Engines (gasoline-Diesel), and Auto- 
motive Technology. These courses are designed to train young men in- 
terested in the electrical, radio, telephone, metal working, wood-working, 
sheet metal, building, automotive, Diesel, heating and other industries 
where technical training is essential to success. The Institute, a func- 
tional part of North Carolina State College, is operated by the Division 
of College E.xtension under the auspices of the School of Engineering. 
A special catalog is available upon request. 

The North Carolina Driver Training School is conducted by the Divi- 
sion in cooperation with the School of Engineering. Drivers and driver 
training instructors for the Motor Transport Industry are trained in this 
school. A bulletin giving complete information concerning the school and 
its functions is available. 

For additional information, any person interested in extension classes, 
correspondence courses, or any of the various functions of the Division 
may secure bulletins by writing to Edward W. Ruggles. Division of 
College Extetisiu)!, North Carolina State College. Raleigh. North Carolina. 



MILITARY TRAINING 



— -DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor of Militari/ Siioiee iiiid TaeticH CoL. R. R. MiDDI.EBROoKS 
Assistant Professors of Militarif Scietice and Taeties Lt. CoL. JOSEPH 

A. McCULLocH, Lt. Col. Basil I. Mishtowt. Major Vernon B. 

Drum, Major James B. Lyon. Major William J. Rieck, Jr., Major 

Tyrus R. Spinella, Capt. R(»bert A. Tolar. (apt. Edward B. 

Turner, Jr.. and Capt. William A. Whkmard. 

_______ DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 



Professor of Air Scietir': COL. J. W. JoDY 

Assistant Professors of Air Science Lt. Col. S. G. AgNEW, Major H. B. 

McCuLLouGH, MAJ<tR N. S. Hays, Capt. V. L. Nunenkamp, Capt. 

Q. M. Lewis, Capt. J. R. Osborn. Capt. G. P. McSweeney, 1st Lt. 

H. R. Selfridge 

165 



MILITARY TRAINING 



OBJECTIVES ______ _________ 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at State Colegre desig- 
nates those students enrolled for traininjj- in the Department of Military 
Science and Tactics or in the Department of Air Science. These Depart- 
ments are integral academic and administrative subdivisions of the 
institution. The senior Army officer and the senior Air Force officer 
assigned to the College are designated as Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics (P;\IST) and Professor of Air Science (PAS), respectively. 
These senior officers are responsible to the Secretary of the Army, the 
Secretary of the Air Force, and the Chancellor of the College for conduct- 
ing their training and academic program in accordance with instructions 
issued by the respective secretaries and as required by college regula- 
tions. Army officers who are assigned to the College as instructors in 
ROTC are designated as Assistant Professors of Militai-y Science and 
Tactics; Air Force officers, as Assistant Professors of Air Science. Non- 
commissioned officers of the Army are assigned as assistant instructors 
and administrative personnel. Non-commissioned officers of the Air 
Force are assigned as administrative and supply personnel. 

The Army ROTC, in four years of military training, produces junior 
officers who have the qualities and attributes essential to their progres- 
sive and continued development as officers of the United States Army. 

The mission of the Air Force ROTC, as defined by the Department of 
the Air Force, is to select and prepare students, through a permanent 
program of instruction at civilian educational institutions, to serve as 
officers in the regular and reserve components of the United States Air 
Force and to assist in discharging, where necessary, any institutional 
obligations to offer instruction in military training. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION — _ _________ 

Programs of instruction for both Army and Air Force ROTC consists 
of a two-year basic course and a two-year advanced course. The satis- 
factory completion of the basic course in either the Army of Air Force 
ROTC is required for all physically fit male freshmen and sophomores 
unless they are excused by the College Administration.'' A detailed 
description of all mitiary courses is given under each of the departments 
in the section of the Catalog which lists Course Descriptions. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS _________ 

The satisfactory completion of the first year of the Army ROTC course 
is a prerequisite to entering the second year. Enrollment in advanced 
courses is elective on the part of the student. The selection of advanced 
course students is made from applicants wlio are physically qualified and 
who have above average academic and military records. Veterans who 
have one year or more of service in the Armed Forces are eligible for 
enrollment in the Army ROTC Advanced Course upon reaching their junior 
year, provided they are in good academic standing, physically qualified, 
have not reached their 27th birthday and are selected by the PMST and 
the Chancellor. Normally no veteran will be selected by the PMST unless 
he has satisfactorily completed a minimum of one semester of the second 
year basic course. 

The Army ROTC course includes instruction in American Military 
History, Map Reading, Leadership, Military Teaching Methods, Military 
Administration, Operations and Logistcs. These subjects not only prepare 
students to be officers in the United States Army, but also awaken in 
them an appreciation of the obligations of citizenship and secure for 
them personal benefits resulting from practical application of organi- 
zation and responsible leadership. 

♦ All veterans in active service as lonK as six months are excused from this requirement, 
but may enroll in the basic coui-se of Army or Air Force to qualify for later enrollment 
in advanced courses. 

166 



MILITARf TRAINING 



— — — — — — — — —— — — — — AIR SCIENCE 

Enrollment in the Air Force ROTC advanced course is elective on the 
part of the student. Selection of advanced course students is made from 
applicants who are physically qualified and who have above avera^re 
academic and military records. Qualified veterans desirinjr a commission 
through the AF ROTC will be required to take that portion of the basic 
course, with their non-veteran contemporaries, which remains before 
they are dassifietl as academic juniors. All veterans must have completed 
their academic and militar.-' requirements prior to their 28th birthday. 

The Air Force ROTC course of study includes instruction in Global 
Geojrraphy, International Tensions and Security Orjranizations, Instru- 
ments of National Military Security. Problem Solving Techniques, Prin- 
ciples of Leadership and Management, and Applied Air Science in addi- 
tion to other applicable subjects. The Air Force ROTC curriculum is 
designed to prepare the student for his oblifjations of citizenship to his 
country both as an officer in the United States Air Force and as a 
civilian. 



— — — — — — — — — — —UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 

Officer's type uniforms for students enrolled in both basic and advanced 
courses in Army ROTC are provided by the Federal Government. Stu- 
dents enrolled in the basic course in Air Force ROTC are provided Air 
Force type uniforms; for students enrolled in advanced courses in both 
Army and Air Force ROTC the college is furnished a monetary allowance 
by the Federal Government for the purchase of uniforms. Army and 
Air Force equipment for instruction of students is provided by the 
Federal Government. Both uniforms and equipment are issued to the 
College, which is accountable for their care and use. 

— — — — — — — — —— — — — — — — CREDIT 

Credit is allowed for work at other institutions having an ROTC Unit 
established in accordance with the provisions of the National Defense 
Act and regulations governing the ROTC. Record of a student's prior 
training in the ROTC is obtained from the institution concerned. 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — —FINANCIAL AID 

Students enrolled in the advanced course are paid a monetary allowance 
in lieu of subsistence at the daily rate equal to the value of the commuted 
ration ($0.90) for a total period not to exceed 5;)5 days during the two 
years of the course. Students in the basic course receive no monetary 
allowance. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE ROTC 



— — — — — — — — — — — _ — ___ ARMY 

The Army ROTC Unit at State College consists of an Army reginu-iit 
and a Drum and Bugle Corps. The Army regiment, commanded by a 
cadet colonel and staff, consists of a Headquarters Company and three 
battalions. The cadet colonel and all other cadet officers are selected from 
students enrolled in the second year advanced course. Cadet first ser- 
geants and sergeants fist class are appointed from students enrolled in 
the first year advanced course. Certain specially selected students in the 
second year basic course are also appointed as cadet non-commissioned 
officers. Cadet officers and non-commissioned officers obtain invaluable 
experience in leadership by being responsible for conducting all drill 

167 



MILITARY TRAINING 



instruction. They are observed and supervised in this by the officers and 
non-commissioned officers of the Army assijrned to the Collegre. 

AIR FORCE ______ _________ 

The Air Force ROTC unit consists of an Air Force Wing- and a Drill 
Team. The Air Force ROTC Wintr, commanded by a cadet colonel, consists 
of three groups, which are composed of four squadrons each. These 
squadrons are divided into three flights per squadron, each flight consist- 
ing of three squads. The wing, group, squadron, and flight commander 
and their staffs are cadet commissioned officers, and are selected from 
cadets enrolled in the second year advanced course. All other positions are 
held by cadet non-commissioned officers, who are selected from the first 
year advanced and second year basic cadets. Cadet officers and non- 
commissioned officers obtain invaluable experience in leadership by being 
responsible for planning and conducting all drill instruction. They are 
observed and supervised by the officers and airmen assigned to the 
College. 

DISTINGUISHED MILITARY STUDENTS— ________ 



The College is authorized to designate outstanding students of the 
ROTC as Distinguished Militaiy Students. These Students may, upon 
graduation, be designated Distinguished Military Graduates and may be 
selected for commissions in the regular Army, provided they so desire. 
Distinguished Military Graduates are not selected for commissions in 
the regular Air Force, but may apply for a regular commission after 
serving on active duty for twelve months. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE IN RELATION TO THE ROTC ______ 



Enrollment in the ROTC does not in itself defer a student from induc- 
tion and service under the Universal Military Training and Service Act. 
The law provides that "within such numbers as may be prescribed by 
the Secretary of Defense, any person who (A) has been or may hereafter 
be selected for enrollment or continuance in the senior division. Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps, or the Air Force Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps, or the Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps; (B) agrees, in 
writing, to accept a commission, if tendered, and to serve, subject to order 
of the Secretary of the Military Department having jurisdiction over 
him, not less than two years on active duty after receipt of a commission; 
and (C) agrees to remain a member of a regular or reserve component 
until the eighth anniversary of the receipt of a commission in accordance 
with his obligation under subsection (d) of section 4 of this title, shall be 
deferred from induction under this title after completion or termination 
of the course of instruction and so long as he continues in a regular or 
reserve status upon being commissioned, but shall not be exempt from 
registration." 



168 



\Vc have niagnificd results rather 
than iiK'thods ol instnution, the use 
ol knowledge rather than its mere 
a( (iiiisiiioii, and the \alne ol our stu- 
(k'lus (;dunnii) to theinscKcs and to 
our Slate rather than the cost ol the 
eolleoe's e(|uipnient and the ;i;reatness 
ol its laeuUy. 

Wallace Carl Riddicli 
Presideul, I') 1 6- 1 921 



Our aim shall he to comhine m(*re 
eompleteK our natural and human re- 
sourees, to improxc and simplily the 
machinery ol lile. and especially to 
dis(()\er and ma,<;nily the elements ol 
worth in our students and stimulate a 
<;eiuiine passion lor liL^hi lixini;. Such 
a hi<;h aim realized will i;ive a greater 
(ommonuealth and make (iitain a 
greater State College. 

/■.ii^cnf Clyde Brooks 
President, l^l'i-l^'it 



169 




GARDNER HALL RAMP TO THE GREENHOUSES 



170 




IN RANGE 



FROM AGRICULTURE TO TEXTILES 



IV. DESCRIPTIONS OF COURSES 



Alphabetically Pages 

A through B 172-184 

C through D 184-199 

E through F 199-222 

G through H 222-231 

I through L 231-242 

M through O 242-258 

P through R 258-273 

S through Z 274-290 

171 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS _______ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Credits and 
Terms Offered 

AGC 212 ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURE 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 201 

An introduction to the economic principles underlying agricultural production; production 

organizotion in agriculture; supply of resources to farmers; the relationships between 

agriculture and the rest of the economy; dynamic factors in the economy as they affect 

agriculture. 

Staff 

AGC 303 FARM MANAGEMENT I 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

This course is designed to help students understand how basic economic principles can be 
applied in the successful operation of a farm. The course will include practice in the 
development of farm plans with special emphasis on how to deal with major problems 
involved in operating a successful farm business. 

Mr. Pierce 

AGC 311 MARKETING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 3(2-3) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

Morketing from the viewpoint of the farmer; relation of demand and supply characteris- 
tics of farm products to marketing problems; foctors influencing efficiency in the produc- 
tion of marketing services. 

Mr. King 

AGC 322 AGRICULTURAL COOPERATION 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A study of the cooperative business method; principles of cooperation applied to farmers' 
purchasing, marketing, and service cooperatives; the role of cooperatives in our society, 
and problems associated with their organization, operation and management. 

Mr. Homme 

AGC 342 MARKETING FIELD CROPS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

A course in agricultural marketing in which principles and theories are taught through 
practical application to cotton, tobacco; and grain marketing processes ;the marketing 
problems and practices and price-making forces affecting each of these commodities. 

Mr. Martin 

AGC 362 MARKETING DAIRY PRODUCTS 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

Economic problems of ossembly, processing, distribution, and consumption of dairy 
products; fluid milk marketing problems of the South; marketing systems, cost factors, 
pricing and government regulations. 

Mr. Homme 

AGC 364 MARKETING FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

Introduction to marketing with illustrations and particular application to fruits and 
vegetables; buying ond selling decisions faced by farmers; supply ond demand charac- 
teristics of principal fruits and vegetobles; the organization of markets and methods of 
marketing; price ond price discrimination; relation of processing industries to marketing; 
the role of government in the marketing of fruits and vegetables. 

Mr. King 

AGC 372 MARKETING LIVESTOCK 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

An introductory course in the economic aspects of marketing. This course will be devoted 
to a study of the market-price mechanism in order to give the student an understanding 
of the functions performed by the market. Special ottention will be given to the manner 
in which morket organizotion ond marketing morgins ore determined with emphasis upon 
the organization of the livestock marketing industry, (offered even years only, beginning 
1956) 

Mr. Williamson 

AGC 405 AGRICULTURAL LAW 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

Provisions of common low and statutory low pertaining to land tenure, form tenancy, 

employment of farm loDor, buying and selling of form products; consequences of legal 

provisions upon farm organization and production, and upon market outlets for farm 

products. 

Mr. Lindsey and Staff 

172 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGC 413 FARM AND APPRAISAL AND FINANCE 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 303 

The principles of farm appraisal and practical methods used in determining the volue 
of farms of venous types and sizes; credit financing in agriculture, including (1) types, 
sources, and cost of credit; (2) repoyment plans; (3) methods of determining when and 
how credit con be used cffectivolv bv farmers; special problems associated with agricul- 
tural credit 

Mr. James 
AGC 431 INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL PRICES 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

This is on introductory course in agricultural price behavior. Emphasis is placed on the 
interpretation of price information as guides for decisions of producers and consumers. 
The course includes a study of factors affecting prices of form products, reasons for the 
fluctuation of prices in different areas and over different periods of time, and some 
elementary methods of price analysis. 

Mr. Pierce 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGC 501 INTERMEDIATE AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212, or consent of instructor 

This course will deal with the functions of on economic system; theories of demand 
end utility; costs and production; competitive and monopolistic pricing; income distribu- 
tion. (Advanced students outside Agricultural Economics may use this course to prepare 
for specialized graduate courses in Agricultural Economics, Econometrics, or Economics.) 

Staff 

AGC 512 LAND ECONOMICS 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

The importance of land in post and present societies; the significance of land as a factor 
of production in the modern market economy; land resources, their use, and the conserva- 
tion problem in the United States; the institutional setting: tenure, tenancy and the 
fomily farm in the United States and other countries; land policies: background and 
problems in Western counties and in under-developed areas of the world. 

Mr. Toussaint 

AGC 521 ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURAL MARKETING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite; AGC 311, or commodity marketing course 

A study of morketinq firms as producers of marketing services and their role in the 
price-making mechanism, from the viewpoint of attempts to increose the efficiency of 
morketino throuoh research. 

Mr. King 

AGC 523 FARM MANAGEMENT 11 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 303 

The application of economic principles in the solution of production problems on typical 

forms in the state; methods and techniques of economic analysis of the form business; 

opplication of research findings to production decisions; development of area agricultural 

programs 

Mr. Lindsey 

AGC 533 AGRICULTURAL POLICY 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

The ogriculturol policy and action programs of the Federal government in their economic 
and political setting; analysis of objectives, principal means, and observable results under 
short-term ond long-term viewpoints and under the criteria of resource use and income 
distribution, within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of the economy; 
criticism and alternative policy proposals; the effects of commodity support programs on 
domestic and foreign consumption, and the international aspects of United States agricul- 
tural policy; the attempts at work market regulation, and the role of international 
organizations, ogrecments, ond progroms. 

Staff 

AGC 551 AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION ECONOMICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 

Description of the conditions affecting economic decisions concerning whether to form, 
what to produce, what methods to use in production, and how much of each commodity 
to produce; application of the conditions of profit moximizotion in farm planning; factors 
determining the distribution of income to and within agriculture and the transfer of 
resources between agriculture and other industries. 

Mr. Bishop 

AGC 552 CONSUMPTION, DISTRIBUTION AND PRICES IN AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prercqjisito AGC 212 

Basis for family decisions concerning consumption of goods and services and supply of 
productive factors; forces determining prices and incomes; interrelationships between 
economic decisions of the household and the firm. 

Mr. Mortin 

173 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



AGC 561 SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY AGRICULTURAL PROBLEMS Maximum of 6 

Prerequisite; Graduate standing and consent of the Instructor 

Analysis of economic problems of current interest in agriculture, leading to a scientific 

appraisal of particular problems, and of alternative solutions to such problems. 

Staff 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

AGC 602 MONETARY AND FISCAL POLICIES IN RELATION TO AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite or corequisite: AGC 501, or equivalent 

The essentials of monetary theory necessary in interpreting and evaluating monetary 
and fiscal operations and policies as to their effect upon income, employment, and price 
level; the monetary and fiscal structure and the mechanics of monetary and fiscal 
operations in the United States; and the relation of monetary and fiscal policies to 
agricultural income and prices. 

Mr. Tolley or Mr. Williamson 

AGC 611 WAGE, PRICE, AND PRODUCTION POLICIES IN 

RELATION TO AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite; AGC 602 

Theories of wages and employmeni, collective bargaining, and wage differentials; in- 
dustrial organization in the economy; integration, price and production policies; costs 
and prices in the cycle, and government policies and workable competition; direct and 
indirect effects of labor and monopoly policies upon the employment of resources, 
national income and its distribution, price levels, wages, interest rates, and upon 
economic magnitudes in agriculture. 

Mr. Martin 

AGC 612 INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN RELATION TO AGRICULTURE 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 602 

The principles of international and interregional trade; structures of trade relationships 
between countries engaged in the import or export of agricultural products; attempts 
at stobilizing trade and financial transactions. 

Staff 

AGC 621 RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Credits by Arrangement 

Prequisites; Graduate standing in Agricultural Economics, and consent of Graduate 

Advisory Committee 
A consideration of research methods and procedures now being employed by research 
workers in the field of agricultural economics, including qualitative and quantitative, 
inductive and deductive methods of research procedure; choice of projects, planning, 
and execution of the research project. 

Staff 

AGC 631 ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF 

AGRICULTURAL POLICY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite; Consent of instructor 

With respect to agricultural policies and programs, the objectives of this program of 
study are to construct a logical framework for and to examine problems likely to be 
encountered in empirical endeavor in any analysis of policy-making processes; inter- 
dependencies among economic, political, and social objectives and action; to study the 
forces which shape economic institutions and social objectives as well as to determine 
and examine critically the logic, beliefs, and values on which particular policies and 
programs are founded. 

Mr. McPherson 

AGC 632 WELFARE EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: AGC 642 

Descriptions of the conditions defining optimal resource allocation; application of the 
conditions for maximum welfare in appraisal of economic policies and programs af- 
fecting resource allocation, income distribution, and economic development of agricul- 
ture. 

Mr. Bishop 

AGC 641 ECONOMICS OF PRODUCTION, SUPPLY AND 

MARKET INTERDEPENDENCY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite or corequisite: AGC 501, or equivalent 

An advanced study In the logic of and empirical inquiry with regard to: producer be- 
havior and choice among combinations of factors and kinds and quantities of output; 
aggregative consequences of individuals' and firms' decisions in terms of product supply 
and factor demand; factor markets and income distribution; general interdependency 
among economic variables of any economy. 

Mr. Williamson 

174 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



AGC 642 ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION, DEMAND, AND 

MARKET INTERDEPENDENCY 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: AGC 641 

An advanced theory of, and research into, household behavior; aggregative consequences 
of household decisions concerning factor supply ond product demond; pricing and in- 
come distribution; economic equilibrium. 

Mr. King 

AGC 651 (ST 651) ECONOMETRIC METHODS I 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 514; 521; AGC 641 and 642 

Decision making under uncertainty. Stochastic elements in economic theories. Problems 
of model construction. Special techniques for analyzing simultoneous economic relations. 

Staff 

AGC 652 (ST 652) ECONOMETRIC METHODS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites; ST 514; 522; AGC 64) and 642 

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of significance as applied to economic data. 
Empirical sampling methods. Non-parametric methods; sequential testing. Extension of 
least squares methods to research in economics; production surfaces. Special topics in 
variance components and mixed models. Use of experimental designs in economic re- 
search. Elements of multivariate analysis. Techniques for anolysis of time series. 

Mr. Anderson 

AGC 671 ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: AGC 642 

A theoretical framework for analysis of the causal forces and the structural interde- 
pendencies under conditions of economic change; mojor problems likely to be en- 
countered in empirical endeavor. 

Mr. McPherson 



____ — — — AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 101— AED I INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 1 (1-0) f 

A study of the job ahead, in college and os a teacher of vocational agriculture; present 
program in North Carolina. 

ED 102 — AED II OBJECTIVES IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 1 (1-0) s 

Purpose of vocational agriculture in the school program. Relation of objectives and 
evaluation. Financing vocational agriculture. Emphasis on the local school community as 
a setting for a program of vocational agriculture. Advantages of being a part of the 
public school. 

ED 201 — AED III FFA IN VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 1 (1-0) f s 

Purposes of Future Farmers of America (FFA) in vocational agriculture. Relationship of 
FFA to supervised farming program. Developing leadership through FFA. 

ED 313 ORGANIZING PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 3(3-0) s 

Essentials of an effective program of vocotional agriculture. Developing the program in 
the local community. Role of the teacher m developing the local program. 

ED 411 STUDENT TEACHING IN AGRICULTURE 6(3-12) f 

The first seven weeks will be on campus; thereafter in selected schools. These schools 
will be selected and assigned, then visited by the students. Using the program in his 
selected school as a guide, the student will study methods of teaching vocational agri- 
culture, including techniques of teaching, selecting and using reference materials, sup- 
plies, equipment and visual aids; organizing and conducting farming programs, FFA odult 
and young farmer classes and other phases of the vocational agriculture program. The 
student will plon effectively for student teaching in his selected school. 
For the remainder of the semester, the student lives in his selected community. He takes 
part, and gets experience, in all phases of the vocational agriculture program. His 
student teaching is supervised by members of the staff in Agricultural Education and 
the locol vocational agriculture teacher. 

Note: 1. A student must have a "C" overage at the time he registers for this course. 
2. Summer Practice — During the summer prior to the yeor in which students 
register for Student Teoching, they will spend two weeks in o vocational 
agriculture department. It is recommended thot one week be before the foil 
school term begins and the other week immediately following the opening of 
the school term. 



175 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

ED 412 TEACHING ADULTS 2(1-2) f 

Principles of effective teaching applied to odult and young farmers. Experience in 
organizing and conducting groups for discussion of local problems. 

ED 413 DEVELOPING AND USING TEACHING MATERIALS 2(1-2) f 

Developing and using teaching materials for more effective instruction. Experience in 
this area with adult and high school classes. 

ED 430 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (1-0) s 

Prerequisite: ED 41 1 

An analysis of the job of the teacher of vocational agriculture with particular emphasis 

upon current problems. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED S54 PLANNING PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Consideration of the community as a unit for planning programs in agricultural educa- 
tion; objectives and evaluation of community programs; use of advisory groups; school 
and community relationships; organization of the department and use of facilities. 

ED 558 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN TEACHING 3 (3-0) f s 

Opportunities for students to study particular problems in teaching under the guidonce 
of the staff. (Maximum of 6 credits) 

ED 563 EFFECTIVE TEACHING 3 (3-0) f s 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course approaches; 
identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effective learning; relationship 
of learning and doing; responsibility for learnings; evaluation of teaching and learning; 
making specific plans for effective teaching. 

ED 568 ADULT EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Designed to meet the needs of teachers as leaders in adult education. More emphasis 
is being given to working with adults as part of the community program of vo-ag. This 
course will give the teacher an opportunity to study some of the basic problems and 
values in working with adult groups. Particular attention will be given to the problem 
of fitting the educational program for adults into the high school program of vo-ag, as 
well as to methods of teaching adults. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 616 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN TEACHING 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

Group and individual study in current and advanced problems in the teaching and 
administration; evaluation of procedures and consideration for improving. (Maximum 
of 6 credits) 

ED 617 PHILOSOPHY OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 3(3-0) f s 

An examination of current educational philosophies and their relation to agricultural 
education. Principles and practices involved in the leadership of a teacher of agriculture 
and in making his work more effective in o rural community. Study of leaders in the field. 

ED 618 SEMINAR IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 1 (1-0) f s 

A critical review of current problems, articles, and books of interest to advanced students 
in agricultural education. (Maximum of 2 credits) 

ED 621 RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

Individual direction in research on a specific problem of concern to the student. Gen- 
erally, the student is preparing his thesis or research problem. (Maximum of 6 credits) 

ED 664 ADMINISTRATION OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing 

Organization, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of present practices, 
theory, principles and techniques of effective administration in agricultural education at 
different levels. 

176 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



AGE 151 FARM MECHANICS 4(2-6) f 

Prerequisite: Freshman in Agriculturol Engineering or Mechanized Agriculture 
Lecture and loboratory practice in woodworking, concrete, ond mosonry work as applied 
to the design and construction of form buildings, sharpening tools; plumbing; sheet metal 
and cold metol work; and electric ond oxy-ocetylene welding as opplied to fabrication 
and repo;r work around the form. 

Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 201 FARM SHOP WOODWORK 2(1-3) f s 

Lecture and laboratory practice in blueprint reading, sketching, and drawing, making 
bills of moterials, farm shop planning, sharpening and fitting tools, use of hand and 
power tools in repoiring form buildings and appliances. 

Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 202 FARM SHOP METALWORK 2(1-3) f s 

Lecture and laboratory practice in sheet metalwork, cold metalwork, arc and oxy-acetylene 
welding, and form shop planning. 

Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 211 FARM POWER AND MACHINERY I 3(2-2) f s 

A study of modern farm machinery, power units ond equipment with emphasis on 
selection, operation, mointenonce, care, and adjustments from the operator's viewpoint. 

Mr. Bowen 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGE 302 AGRICULTURAL DRAWING 2(0-6) f s 

This IS a course designed to study drawing-board work including sketching, elementary 
mechanical drawing, working drawings, lettering, tracing, blueprint reading, reproduction 
processes, and job oiannmo. 

Mr. Porker 

AGE 321 IRRIGATION, DRAINAGE AND TERRACING 3(2-3) f s 

4(2-6) f 
Prerequisite: CE 201 for 4 credit course 

Needs for irrigotion in the Southeast and methods of accomplishment; methods of 
draining excess woter from agricultural oreas; the use of basic surveying equipment; and 
the need for and methods of accomplishing erosion control by mechanical measures to 
supplement vegetative progroms. 

Mr. Wilson 

AGE 331 DAIRY ENGINEERING 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: PY 21 1 

This course embodies the applicotion and moinfenance of power, heating, ond refrigera- 
tion to equipment and controls used in dairy manufacturing. 

Mr. Parker 

AGE 332 FARM BUILDINGS AND CROP PROCESSING 3(2-3) f 

4(2-6) f 
Prerequisite: EM 341 for 4 credit course 

Construction moteriols, structural features, and design loads. Functional planning of 
form buildings for housing domestic animals ond for storing and hondling form crops. 
Curing and drying of form crops. 

Mr. Parker 

AGE 341 FARM ELECTRIFICATION AND UTILITIES 3 (2-2) f 

4 (2-4) f 
Prerequisite:J Junion standing 

Problems and generol study In the proper selection and use of applicable form electric 
equipment ond ollled util'ties. 

Messrs. Weover, Blum 

AGE 371 SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION ENGINEERING 4(3-3) f 

Prerequisites: CE 201, Soils 200 

(General aspects of agricultural hydrology, including precipitation, clossiflcotion of 
climate, rainfall disposition, methods of estimating runoff, fundamental soil ond water 
relationships, and hydroulics of flow in open chonnels and closed conduits, will be given. 
Included also ore factors affecting erosion, methods of controlling erosion, land use 
clossificotion, droinoge, land cleoring, irrigotion methods, design requirements for portoble 
Irrigotion systems, and economic aspects of Irrigotion In the Southeost . 

Mr. Wilson 

177 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



AGE 401 FARM SHOP ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisites; AGE 201 and 202 

The use and care of power tools; planning of school shops and laboratories; selection 
of tools, materials, and equipment; shop management; and methods of presenting the 
subject matter. 

Messrs. Howell, Blum 

AGE 411 FARM POWER AND MACHINERY IIB 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite; AGE 21 1 

This course is designed to provide students in Mechanized Agriculture with a knowledge 
of the operations of manufacturing and distributing organizations of farm machinery 
and their places in these organizations. Included is a practical course in farm tractors 
and engines with emphasis on familiarizing the student with component parts — their 
application, operation, and maintenance, as well as with the selection of these units 
from the standpoint of power, performance, and ratings. 

Messrs. Bowen, Greene 

AGE 451 CURING AND DRYING OF FARM CROPS 2(1-2) f 

Prerequisite; ME 301, EM 430 or taken concurrently 

Physical properties of air, fuels, and crop products as applied to the design of systems 
for the removal of moisture from crops. Problems involved in handling and storage in 
conjunction with driers. 

Mr. Parker 

AGE 452 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Students will prepare talks in their particular field of interest, presenting them to the 
group. Also, two or three field trips to selected points of educational opportunities will 
be mode during the second semester. Maximum of two credits allowed. 

Mr. Giles and Staff 

AGE 462 FARM POWER AND MACHINERY IIA 4(3-3) f 

Prerequisites; AGE 21 1; EM 321 

A study of the basic principles underlying the functional elements of farm machinery, 
including analysis of operation, functions of various components, basic studies of 
processes, and the service adjustment and operation of current farm equipment. The 
course also includes a fundamental study of internal combustion engines and power 
trains to the various outlets; basic designs and applications of farm tractors, including 
hitches, power lifts, and other integral parts. 

Messrs. Bowen, Greene 

AGE 481 FARM STRUCTURES 4(3-3) s 

Prerequisites; AGE 451 and EM 321 

Space and grouping arrangements, material use, and construction techniques to gain 
optimum efficiency, use, and satisfaction from buildings on the farm. The design of 
walls and wall coverings to impair the transfer of heat and moisture. The design of 
building elements and their connections to withstand their imposed loads. 

Mr. Parker 

AGE 491 RURAL ELECTRIFICATION 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite; EE 320 

A study of the history and development of rural electrification, rotes and costs of 
serving the farm with electricity; farm wiring and lighting; electric motors; water 
systems; feed grinding and other applications of electricity to farming. Also included 
for study are materials and design for rural distribution lines; switches and controls; 
heat and refrigeration; poultry and dairy equipment; and other applicable uses of 
electricity in farm processes. 

Mr. Weaver 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

AGE 551 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite; Senior or Graduate standing in Agricultural Engineering. 

Each student will select a subject on which he will do research and write a technical 
report on his results. He may choose a subject pertaining to his particular interest in 
any area of study in Agricultural Engineering. 

Mr. Giles and Staff 

AGE 552 INSTRUMENTATION FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH 

AND PROCESSING 1 (0-2) f or s 

Prerequisite; PY 403 

Elaboration of the theory and principles of various primary sensing elements. Relates the 
output signal of electrical transducers to wheatstone bridge and potentiometer measuring 
circuits for calibration of the signal with the variable under study. Introduces the 
principles of circuits and mechanisms used for indicating, recording, and/or controlling 
process variobles. Representative equipment will be employedwhenever feasible. 

Mr. Hassler 

178 



AGRICULTURE 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

AGE 651 RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate status in Agricultural Engineering 

Performance of a particular investigation of concern to Agricultural Engineering. The 
study will begin witn the selection of a problem ond culminate with the presentation of 
a thesis. A maximum of six credits is allowed towards a Masters Degree; no limitation 
on credits in Doctorate program. 

Mr. Giles and Staff 

AGE 652 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Elaboration of subject areas, techniques and methods peculiar to professional interest 
through presentations of personal and published works; opportunity for students to 
present and defend their ideas, concepts, and inferences. A maximum of two credits may 
be eorned. 

Mr. Hassler 

AGE 654 AGRICULTURAL PROCESS ENGINEERING 3(3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites; AGE 451 , PY 402, MA 511 

Operations employed during processing for maximizing consumer quality and economic 
gam. Agricultural processing operations are analyzed on a "unit operation" basis, taking 
into consideration physical and chemical changes. Generalized physical theory will be 
presented as it relates to idealizations in agricultural processing. 

Mr. Hassler 

AGE 661 ANALYSIS OF FUNCTION AND DESIGN OF FARM MACHINERY 3 (2-3) f or s 

Prerequisites: AGE 462, MA 401, PY 401, 3 hours of statistics 

Principles and theories for establishing and interpreting the following: (1) functional 
requirements of machine components, and (2) discriminate and indiscriminate mechanical 
selection of agricultural products. 

Mr. Bowen 

AGE 671 THEORY OF DRAINAGE, IRRIGATION AND EROSION CONTROL 4(3-3) f or s 
Prerequisits: AGE 371; EM 430, MA 401, SOI 511 

Emphasis is placed on the physicol and mathematical aspects of problems in conserva- 
tion engineering and an attempt is made to rationalize procedures which have often 
came about through experience rather than through analytical considerations. Examples 
are presented of cases where such an onalytical approach has already improved, or shows 
promise of improving, design criteria and procedures. 

Messrs. van Schilfgoarde, Wilson 

AGE 681 ANALYSIS OF FUNCTION AND DESIGN OF FARM BUILDINGS 4 (4-0) f or s 
Prerequisites: AGE 481 and PY 402 

Functional requirements of form structures with respect to mon, animal and crop, and 
development of the means for providing structures which fulfill the functional require- 
ments. Environmental problems and planning for integration of structural, environmental, 
and economical desiqn. 

Mr. Parker 



AGRICULTURE 



AG 101 AGRICULTURE AND WORLD AFFAIRS 3(2-2) f 

A required course for Freshmen in the School of Agriculture except those in Agricultural 
and Biological Chemistry. This course deols with the agriculture and agricultural regions 
of the United States. It also deals with population trends and densities in relation to 
food production and other natural resources throughout the world. 

AG 301 AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS FOR AGRICULTURE 2(2-0) s 

A study of the major educational and service agencies designed to advance agriculture 
and rurol living The development of ogricultural problems in the United States is 
traced as a background for consideration of the objectives, organization, and procedures 
of these agencies and programs. 

Mr. Sloan 

AG 401 PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF EXTENSION EDUCATION ' (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing iGraduate credit in special coses with permission of 

committee) 
A study of the background, development, and operation of the Agricultural Extension 
Service. Consideration is given to maior evenis leading to the establishment of Agricul- 
tural Extension, its objectives, organization, and philosophy. Major emphasis is placed 
upon the principles underlymq Extension education together with methods of progrom 
building and teaching. 

Mr. Sloan 

179 



ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Al 201 ELEMENTS OF DAIRY SCIENCE 4(3-3 f s 

Fundamental principles of milk production; breeds, selection, feeding and manage- 
ment of dairy cattle; composition, quality end food value of milk products; principles 
of processing and manufacturing dairy products. 

Messrs. Haig, Worren 

Al 202 FUNDAMENTALS OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 4(3-3) f s 

Principles of feeding, managing and marketing meat cnimols. Year to year and seasonal 
price trends end relationships. Relation of slaughter grades to carcass cut-out values. 

Mr. Goode 

Al 301 GRADING AND SELECTING MEAT ANIMALS 2(0-6) s 

Study of breed charocteristics and type by species. Market classes and grades of beef 
cattle, sheep and hogs relating live animal grade to carcass grade and cut-out value. 

Mr. Goode 

Al 303 MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS 3(1-6) f s 

Study of live animal and carcass relationships, dressing percentages and cut-out values. 
Slaughtering, cutting, curing, freezing and handling of meat and meat products for 
commercial and home use. 

Messrs. Blumer, Brown 

Al 305 JUDGING AND SELECTION— DAIRY CATTLE 2(0-6) f 

Breed characteristics, score-card requirements and adaptability to North Carolina of 
the 5 mojor dairy breeds. Practice judging with oral reasons. 

Mr. Murley 

Al 306 ADVANCED JUDGING AND SELECTION — DAIRY CATTLE 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: Al 305 

Advanced judging with emphasis on oral reasons and show-ring requirements, trips to 
leading farms. Only students working for place on judging team will take this course. 

Mr. Murley 

Al 307 ADVANCED JUDGING AND SELECTION — GENERAL LIVESTOCK 1 (0-6) f 

Prerequisite: Al 301 

Advanced course stressing the importance of methods in making rapid and accurate 

observations. Sets up standards of animal excellence and provides practice in orol 

reasons. 

Mr. Gregory 

Al 309 MEAT SELECTION 1 (0-6) f 

Detailed consideration of factors involved in selection of carcasses and wholesale cuts 
of beef, pork and lamb. Practice in identification of wholesale and retail cuts. 

Mr. Blumer 

Al 312 PRINCIPLES OF LIVESTOCK NUTRITION 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CH 351 and ZO 301 

Fundamentals of modern animal nutrition, including classification of nutrients, their 
general metabolism and roles in productive functions. 

Mr. Wise 

Al 401 BEEF CATTLE PRODUCTION 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Al 203 

Fundamental principles of the production of beef; selection, feeding and management 

of breeding herds and feeder cattle. 

Mr. Barrick 

Al 402 SHEEP PRODUCTION 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Al 203 

Study of the factors involved in the feeding, breeding, management and marketing 
of lamb, mutton ond wool. 

Mr. Goode 

Al 403 PORK PRODUCTION 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Al 203 

Study of production, management and marketing practices involved in the successful 
production of swine. 

Mr. Clawson 

180 



ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

Al 404 DAIRY FARM PROBLEMS 3 f2 3\ , 

Prerequisite: Al 201 ' 

Advanced study of procticol doiry form monogement including form records form 
buildings, sonifotion, roughoge utilizotion and herd culling. 

Al 406 ANIMAL INDUSTRY SEMINAR '^V H-'oM 

Review and discussion of special topics and the current literature pertaining to all 
phases of onimol production. a « v^ 

Mr. Pou 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

Al 501 PHYSIOLOGY OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS 4(3 31 ♦ 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 ^^''*' * 

^nirn"!^*^ '" °^'^°'^^^^ physiology of domestic mammols with special reference to farm 

Messrs. Cosody ond Thomas 

Al 502 REPRODUCTION AND LACTATION 4 f3 ?^ . 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 ^ ■" * 

Anatomy and physiology of the reproductive organs and mammary glands with de- 
toiled coveroqe of physiological processes involved and factors controlling and in- 
fluencing them. Specific applications to form animals including artificial inseminotion. 

Messrs. Casady and Myers 

Al 503 ANIMAL BREEDING -n-t -ts t 

Prerequisite: GN 41 1 ^^"•" ' * 

Troits of economic importance in livestock production, and their mode of inheritance 
Phenotypic and genetic relationships between traits. The place of selection inbreed- 
ing and crossbreeding in a program of animal improvement. 

Mr. Dillard 

Al 505 DISEASES OF FARM ANIMALS 3 (3 0) f 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

The pathology of bacterial, virus, porositic, nutritionol and thermal diseases and 

mechanical disease processes. 

Mr. Osborne 

Al 507 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL INDUSTRY Mox 6 f s 

Special problems may be selected or assigned in various phases of Animal Industry 

A maximum of six credits is allowed. 

Staff 

Al 513 NEEDS AND UTILIZATION OF NUTRIENTS BY LIVESTOCK 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Al 312 or equivalent ' 

Measurement of nutrient needs of livestock and fhe nutrient values of feeds Nutritive 
requirements for productive functions. 

Mr. Wise 
COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

Al 600 RESEARCH IN ANIMAL INDUSTRY Credits bv Arrongement f s 

A maximum of six hours ,s allowed toward the Master's degree: no limitation on 
credits in Doctorate progroms 

Stoff 
Al 601 SEMINAR IN ANIMAL NUTRITION | /i.«) < . 

Prerequisite: Permission of seminar leaders 

Orientotion in philosophy of research; organization for research in agriculture and 
generol research methodology. ^ ^.uMule, ana 

Nutrition Stoff 

Al 602 ADVANCED ANIMAL BREEDING 3 fArr-n-.HM 

Prerequisite: Statistics 625 ^ (Arronged) 3 

tfll^^l °V^^!. '°'T influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding ond its effects ond 
olternative breeding plans. cti-ii, ana 

Mr. Legates 
Al 603 ANIMAL NUTRITION. MINERAL METABOLISM a „ a, , 

Prerequisite: Al 312 or CH 452 ^ ^^■"' ' 

Role of minerals in the nutrition of animals with emphasis on ovoilable knowledoe o 
Sended '''°^'""" °'''°''' ""^^ °'"' ^''^^"^^^ '" which .nvest.oa^.ons S to ' b^ 

, Mr. Motrone 

* Offered in odd calendar yeors. 

181 



ARCHITECTURE — BIOLOGY — BOTANY 

Al 621 (CH 621) ENZYMES AND iNTERMEOIARY METABOLISM 4(3-4) f 

Prerequisites: CH 51 1 and permission of instructor 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action; intermediary metabolism of 
carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines and phorphrins; metabolic 
energy relationships. 

Mr. Tove 

Al 623 (CH 623) BIOLOGICAL ASSAY OF VITAMINS 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisites: CH 551 or Al 3 1 2, ST 51 2 

Techniques and designs of biological essays for vitamins. The interrelotionship of 
logical principles, design ond analysis Is emphasized. 

Staff 



ARCHITECTURE 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 101-102 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE 2(1-3) f s 

The application of the basic principles and fundamentals of design to architecture. The 
elements of descriptive geometrv, architectural shades and shadows and perspective. 
ARC 301-302 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I, II 6(3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: Design 202-2 I 2, EM 311, PY 212 

Required of all third year students in Architecture Relationship of exterior and interior 
spoces. Structure as a primary and essential element in construction and design. 

Mr. Caminos and Mr. Adams 

ARC 401-402 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN III, IV 6(3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: ARC 302, CE 339, EM 321 

Required of oil fourth year students in Architecture. A study of architectural design 
process as applied to larger buildings and groups of buildings. Introductory exercise in 
theory and practice of physical city planning. 

Mr. Matsumoto 

ARC 501-502 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN V, VI 6(3-12) f s 

Prerequisites: ARC 402, CE 436 

Required of all fifth year students In Architecture. Archltecturol Research Design. 

Mr. Catalano 



BIOLOGY ____________ 

80 301 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

A survey of the major principles of the biological sciences. A course designed for students 
who have not had a college course in the biological sciences and who do not anticipate 
further study in biology. Not acceptable as a prerequisite for further work in the 
biological sciences. 

Mr. Evers 



BOTANY ____________ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 101 GENERAL BOTANY 3(3-0) f s 

An introductory study of the structure, physiology and ecology of high green plants. 

Staff 

BO 102 GENERAL BOTANY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequpisite: BO 101 

A study of sexual reproduction and heredity in the flowering plants; a survey of the 
life histories of the major groups of non-green and green plants. 

Staff 

BO 203 INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMATIC BOTANY 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: BO 101 

An introduction to the local flora ond the classification of the plonts included therein. 

Messrs. Beol and Wilbur 



182 



BOTANY 

BO 211, 212 DENDROLOGY 2(1-3) f s 

Prerequisites: BO 102 

Must be taken in the order listed except by permission. 
A systematic survey of the principal hardwood (ongisperm) and evergreen (gymnosperm) 
genera and species of North American trees. Emphasis will be upon those of commercial 
importance and particularly those in the eastern United States. 

Mr. Wilbur 

BO 410 PLANT HISTOLOGY AND MICROTECHNIQUE 3(1-6) f 

Prerequisites: BO 102; CH 203 

Studies o fthe principal tissues of Angiospcrms in terms of the theory and practice of 
optical instrumentation, microtechnical preparations, and photomicrography. 

Mr. Ball 

BO 412 GENERAL BACTERIOLOGY 4(2-4) f s 

Prerequisites: BO 102 (or ZO 101); CH 101 

Open to uDperclassmen in Sanitary Engineering with only a chemistry 

prerequisite 
A study of the fundamental concepts and techniques of microbiology; isolation, culti- 
vation, observation, morphology, physiology and nutrition of microorganisms. 

Mr. Borg 

BO 421 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 4 (2-4) f s 

Prerequisites: BO 102; CH 203 

An introductory treatment of the chemical and physical processes occurring in higher 
green plants with emphasis upon the mechanism, factors affecting, correlations between 
processes, and bioloQicol significance. 

Messrs. Anderson, Brun, Scofield 

BO 441 PLANT ECOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 102 

A study of the principles and factors determining the distribution of plants including 
discussion of the major groupings of plants into vegetotional types. 

• _ Mr. Bourdeau 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 512 MORPHOLOGY OF VASCULAR PLANTS 2(1-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 1 02 

A study of comparative morphology, ontogeny and evolution of the vascular plants. 

Emphasis is placed upon the phylogeny of sexual reproduction and of the vascular 

systems. 

Mr. Ball 

80 513 PLANT ANATOMY 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisites: BO 102 

A study of the onatomy of the Angiosperms ond Gymnosperms. The development of 
tissues is traced from their origin by mcristcms to their mature states. 

Mr. Ball 

BO 521 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY OF MONOCOT FAMILIES 3 (0-6) f 

Prerequisites: BO 102, 203 

A comprehensive survey of the systemotics of monocot families with speciol emphasis 

on grosses. Terminalaqy, identification, relationships and economic significance are 

stressed. 

Mr. Beal 

BO 523 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY OF DICOT FAMILIES 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisites: BO 102, 203 

A compresensive survey of the systemotics of dicot families. Emphasis is given to the 
history of systemotics, its significance and relation to other disciplines, the principles of 
plont clossificotion, major systems of classification and the Internationol Rules of 
Botanical Nomenclature. 

Mr. Wilbur 

BO 532, 533 ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 2 (2-0) » s 

Prerequisites: 80 421 or equivalent 

An advanced treatment of metabolism and growth in higher green plonts with emphasis 

upon the theoretical principles which form the basis for interpretations. 

Mr. Brun 

BO 545 ADVANCED PLANT ECOLOGY 3 (2-3) , 

Prerequisites: BO 421, 441 or equivalent 

An advanced discussion of tne principles, theories ond methods of plant ecology. 

Mr. Bourdeau 

183 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING 



BO 573 AQUATIC BOTANY 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisite: BO 102 

A discussion of the taxonomy and ecology of the aquatic plants including the im- 
portant fresh-water algae, aquatic bacteria, fungi, water "ferns," mosses and liverworts, 
and the important genera of flowering plants. 

Mr. Whitford 

COURSES LIMITED TO GRADUATE STUDENTS 

BO 635 THE MINERAL NUTRITION OF PLANTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

Discussion of the accumulation, translocation and utilization of mineral elements by 
higher plants. Emphasis will be placed on the relationships between these processes and 
plant metabolism. 

Mr. Evans 

BO 650 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BOTANY Credits by Arrangement f s 

Graduate students in fields allied to Botany may conduct intensive study of a problem 
in some specialized phase of botany. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 651 RESEARCH IN BOTANY Credits by Arrongement t s 

Graduate student majors in Botany undertake research problems preparatory to writing 
a Master's Thesis or a PhD Dissertation. 

Graduate Staff 

BO 661 BOTANY SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Graduate student credit allowed if one paper per semester is presented at the Seminar. 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING 



^'H»-'J 



MIC 200 INTRODUCTION TO CERAMICS 1 (1-0) f s 

Historical notes and quality characteristics of such ceramic products as glass, enamels, 
pottery, brick, tile and cements. Industrial classification, scientific developments, eceno 



BOURSES FOB UNDERGRADUATES 

MIC 200 INTRODUCTION TO CERAMK 

Historical notes and quality characterist 
pottery, brick, tile and cements. Industr 
^m^and c^^^ral ^^^PQj^ne. ^e^s.^ J^ ^ , i/S^- 3 

MIC 301 CERAMIC OPERATIONS I 4'(3-3T f 

Unit operations pertaining to ceramic product manufacture. Crushing, grinding, particle 

size classif icotion and packing. Colloidal and rheological properties of slips, slurries 
and plastic masses. Lectures and laboratory. 

MIC 302 CERAMIC OPERATIONS II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: MIC 301 and Ph 201 

A ontinuation of MIC 301. Dewatering of slips and slurries. Properties of air and 

air-vapor mixtures, heat transmission, fluid flow, drying, drier calculations. Lectures and 

laboratory. 

MIC 312 CERAMIC PROCESS PRINCIPLES I 4(3-3) f 

Corequisite: MIC 302 

Principles of combustion, heat transfer. Introduction to pyrochemical and physichemical 
changes in ceramic materials. Measurements, controls and calculations of furnaces and 
kilns. Lectures and laborotory. 

MIC413 CERAMIC PROCESS PRINCIPLES II 4(3-3) f 

Prerequisites: MIC 312 and CH 532 

A continuation of MIC 312. Introduction to crystal chemistry and the constitution of 
glass. Consideration of special problems relating to glasses, glazes and enamels, including 
opacity ond color. Applications of the principles of phase equilibria with particular 
reference to refractories. Lectures and laboratory. 

MIC 414 SENIOR THESIS 3(1-6) f s 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester moy be 

elected 
An introduction to research. Literature search, laboratory investigation and written 
report in the form of a thesis. Conference and laboratory. 

MIC 415, 416 CERAMIC ENGINEERING DESIGN 2(0-6) f s 

The methods of ceramic equipment, structures and plant designing. 

MIC 420 INDUSTRIAL CERAMICS 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the various ceramic Industries, including monufacturing techniques, labor 

and professional relationships, and the present and future status of the respective 
industries. Lectures and discussion. 

184 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING 



MIC 425 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

One semester required of seniors in Ceramic Engineering. A second semester may be 

elected 
Literature survey of selected topics in ceramic engineering. Oral and written reports, 
discussions. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MIC 503 CERAMIC MICROSCOPY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 531 

Petrographic techniques for the systematic study of ceramic materials and products. 
Interpretation and representation of results. 

MIC 505 RESEARCH AND CONTROL METHODS 3 (2-3) f s 

Lectures, demonstrations and experiments on instrumental methods of ceramic investiga- 
tion. 

MIC 507, 508 ADVANCED CERAMIC EXPERIMENTS 3(1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 414 or equivalent 

Advanced studies in ceramic laboratory experimentation. 

MIC 511 ADVANCED STUDIES IN FIRING 3(2-3) f s 

Advanced studies of ceramic f ring procedures with emphasis on the design, calculation 
and economic evaluation of kilns and furnoces. 

MIC 522 STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of the structural clay products industries with emphasis on the latest 
developments in the field. 

MIC 526 REFRACTORY TECHNOLOGY 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of refractory manufacture with emphasis on the latest advances in the 

field. 

MIC 527 REFRACTORIES IN SERVICE 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

A study of the physical ond chemical properties of the more important refractories in 
respect to their environment in industrial and laboratory furnoces. 

MIC 532 TECHNOLOGY OF ABRASIVES 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

The methods of manufacture, properties and application of abrasives to industrial 
grinding, cu^tlnn and polishing. 

MIC 535, 536 ENAMELS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of ceramic coatings for ferrous, aluminum and special high temperature 

alloys used for domestic appliances, structural members aircraft parts, etc. 

MIC 540 GLASS TECHNOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

Fundamentals of glass manufacture including compositions, properties and applications 
of the principle types of commercial glasses. 

MIC 543, 544 TECHNOLOGY OF THE WHITEWARE INDUSTRIES 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

Technology of whiteware bodies and glazes. 

MIC 548 TECHNOLOGY OF CEMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 413 

The technology of the Portland cement industry including manufacture, control and uses. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MIC 605, 606 CRYSTAL STRUCTURES 2(2-0) f s 

Basic lows of crystal structure Relation of crystal structure to chemical and physicol 
properties. 

MIC 613 CERAMIC THERMAL MINERALOGY 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIC 605 

Applications of the principles of thermalchemical mineralogy to ceramic problems. 

MIC 650 CERAMIC RESEARCH 1 to 9 credits 

per semester 

An original and independent investigation in ceramic engineering. A report of such an 
investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

185 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



, MrC 660 CERAMIC ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

•4 Reports and discussion of special topics in ceramic engineering and allied fields. 

MIC 661, 662 SPECIAL STUDIES IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 1 to 3 credits 

per semester 

Special studies of advanced topics in ceramic engineering. Credit will vary with the topic. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ________ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 205 CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES I 4(3-2) f 

Prerequisite: PV 201 

Required of sophomores in Chemical Engineering 
The calculation of material and energy balances, stolchiometry, gas laws, vapor pressure, 
humidity, saturation, thermophysics and thermochemistry. Three lectures and one problem 
period. 

CHE 301, 302 ELEMENTS OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 3(3-0) f s 

An introduction to principles of chemical engineering including calculations involved 
in Industrial processes and equipment. The course is designed for students not majoring 
in chemical engineering. 

CHE 311 CHEMICAL PROCESS PRINCIPLES II 3(3-3) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 205 

Required of juniors In Chemical Engineering 
A continuation of CHE 205. One laooratory period is devoted to typical chemical 
engineering measurements. 

CHE 411 UNIT OPERATIONS I 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 31 1 

Required of juniors in Chemical Engineering 
Principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, evaporation, etc., with emphasis on design 
calculations. 

CHE 412 UNIT OPERATIONS II 4(4-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 41 1 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 
A continuation of CHE 41 ] with emphasis or the diffusional operations such as 
absorption, distillation, extraction, drying, etc. 

CHE 415 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 4(3-2) f 

Prerequisites: CH 531 , CHE 31 1 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 
A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical engineering 
problems. Emphasis on the theory, data and approximation methods as applied to 
physical and chemical systems. 

CHE 431, 432 UNIT OPERATIONS LABORATORY I AND II 3(1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 41 1 

Required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 
Laboratory work on typical apparotus involving the unit operations. Experiments ore 
designed to augment the theory and data of the lecture courses and to develop 
proficiency in the writinn of technical reports. 

CHE 453 CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS 3 (3-0) 

Consideration of the unique procedures required for the bulk manipulation of radioactive 
chemicals. Particular attention Is given to remote operational procedures of precipitation, 
centrifugation, conveying, solvent extraction and ion exchange. Design of apparatus 
Involving low maintenance and ease of replacement and cleaning by safe methods is 
considered. Other topics Include decontamination procedures and disposal of wastes. 

CHE 460 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

One semester required of seniors in Chemical Engineering. 

Literature survey of selected topics In chemical engineering. Emphasis on written and 
oral presentation. 

CHE 470 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS 2 Arrange f s 

One semester required of seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Introduction to research through experimental, theoretical ond literature studies of 

chemical engineering problems. Orol and written presentation of reports. 

186 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 525 PROCESS MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL 3 Arrange f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 41 I 

Theory and opplication of methods for measuring, transmitting, recording and controlling 
such process variables as temperature, pressure, flow rote, liquid level, concentration, 
humidity etc. Commercial instruments are utiliezd for study of a wide variety of in- 
dustrial control problems. Recorder-controllers are available for simulating industrial 
control problems of varying difficulty. 

CHE 527 CHEMICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

A study of selected chemical processes with emphasis on the engineering, chemical and 
economic factors involved. 

CHE 540 ELECTROCHEMICAL ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry 

The opplication of electrochemical principles to suh topics as electrolysis, electro- 
analysis, electroplating, metal refining, etc. 

CHE. 541 CELLULOSE INDUSTRIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

Methods of manufacture and application of cellulose chemical conversion products. 
Emphasis placed on recent development in the fields of synthetic fibers, films, lacquers, 
and other cellulose compounds. 

CHE 542 TECHNOLOGY OF PULP AND PAPER 3 Arronge f 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

Fundamentals of pulp and paper manufacture with emphasis on recent advances in the 
field. One laboratory period per week is devoted to topics such as digestion and treat- 
ment of pulp, handsheet preparation and testing, fiber analysis, and chemical ond 
physicol tests. 

CHE 543 TECHNOLOGY OF PLASTICS 3 (3-0 s 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

The properties, methods of manufacture, and application of synthetic resins. Recent 

developments in the field are stressed. 

CHE 545 PETROLEUM REFINERY ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An introduction to the petroleum industry including (1) nature of petroleum and its 
fractions, octane numbers, viscosity relationships, etc., (2) operations of thermal ond 
catalytic cracking, stabilization, olkylation isomerization, crude fractionation, etc., (3) 
problem work covering high pressure phase relationships, and related material. 

CHE 546 CHEMICAL REACTION RATES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 415 

A basic study of the rates of homogeneous reactions, heterogeneous reactions, and 

catalysis. 

CHE 570 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS 3 Arrange f s 

Prerequisite or concurrent: CHE 412 

A loborotory study of some phase of chemical engineering or allied field. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CHE 610 HEAT TRANSFER I 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 4) 1 

An advanced course deolmg primarily with heot tronsfer between liquids and solids, 
optimum operating conditions and design of equipment, conduction, heoting and cooling 
of solids, radiant heat transmission. 

CHE 611 HEAT TRANSFER II 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 610 

An intensive study of recent advances in heat transfer and allied fields. 

CHE 612 DIFFUSIONAL OPERATIONS 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An advonced treatment of mass transfer particularly os applied to obsorption, extraction, 
drying, humidif icaf lon and dehumidif ication. 

CHE 613 DISTILLATION 3(3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Vapor-liquid equilibria of non-ideal solutions, continuous distillation of binary and multi- 
component systems, batch distillation, ozeotropic and extraction distillation. 

187 



CHEMISTRY 



CHE 614 DRYING OF SOLIDS 2(2-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

An advanced course on the mechanism of drying operations with opplicotion to design 
of equipment, such as cabinet, tunnel, rotary, drum and spray driers. 

CHE 615 THERMODYNAMICS I 3(3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 415 

Advanced topics in Chemical Engineering thermodynamics including equilibria of physical 
and chemical systems, high pressure systems, generalized properties of hydrocarbons, etc. 

CHE 616 THERMODYNAMICS II 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: CHE 615 

An intensive study of recent advances in thermodynamics. 

CHE 617 CATALYSIS OF INDUSTRIAL REACTIONS 3(3-0) 

Prerequisite: CHE 546 

A study of the mechanism of catalysis with emphasis on practical application to operation 
and design of Industrial processes. 

CHE 631, 632 CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN 3(3-0} f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Design and selection of process equipment, through solution of comprehensive problems 
involving unit operations, kinetics, thermodynamics, strength of materials and chemistry. 

CHE 641, 642 ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 3 Arrange f s 

Prerequisite: CHE 412 

Advanced laboratory work in a selected field with emphasis on theory, techniques and 

performance of equipment. 

CHE 650 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 1 to 3 credits 

per semester f s 

A study of recent developments in chemical engineering theory and practice, such as ion 
exchange, crystallization, mixing, molecular distillation, hydrogenation, f luorination, etc. 
The topic will vary from term to term 

CHE 660 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1 credit 

per semester f s 

Literature investigations and reports of special topics In chemical engineering and allied 
fields. 

CHE 680 CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 1 to 9 credits 

per semester f s 

Independent investigation of an advanced chemical engineering problem. A report of 
such an investigotion is required as a graduate thesis. 



CHEMISTRY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 101 GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4(3-2) t s 

The language of Chemistry, fundamental chemical laws and theories, limited study of 
selected chemical elements, comoounds, reactions and processes. 

Staff 

CH 103 GENERAL AND QUALITATIVE CHEMISTRY 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

Homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium, oxidation and reduction, metallurgy, funda- 
mental properties of metals, non-metals, their compounds, introduction to organic and 
nuclear chemistry, industrial applications of some metals, non-metals, and their 
compounds. The laboratory work is entirely semimlcro qualitative analysis. 

Staff 

CH 103 L SEMIMiCRO QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisite: 1 year of General Chemistry not including Qualitative Analysis 
Chiefly the laboratory work of CH 103. 

CH 201 GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 5(3-6) f 

Includes content of CH 101 supplemented by additional laboratory work. 

Staff 



188 



CHEMISTRY 



CH 203 GENERAL AND ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4(3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

Chemistry 203 includes a furttier study of the principles of general chemistry as presented 
in CH 101, and also an introduction to Organic Chemistry. The Organic Chemistry 
survey includes the hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, acids and deriva- 
tives, esters, phenols, fats, carbohydrates, ommo acids, proteins, and a selected group of 
natural and synthetic products. 

Staff 

CH 205 GENERAL AND QUALITATIVE CHEMISTRY 5 (3-6) s 

Prerequisite: CH 101 or 201 

Includes content of CH 103 supplemented by additional laboratory work. 

Stoff 

CH 211 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4(2-6) f 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Volumetric onolysis, including the techniques, chemistry, stoichiometry, and basic chemical 
principles of neutralization, oxidation, and precipitation analysis with laboratory applica- 
tion to representative analyses. 

Mr. Hentz 

CH 212 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4(2-6) s 

Prerequisites: CH 21 1 and one semester of General Physics 

Continuation of CH 211 to the study of potentiometric titrations, colorimetry, pH 
measurement, electrodeposition, and gravimetric methods of analysis with representa- 
tive laboratory applications. 

Mr. Hentz 

CH 215 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4(3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

One semester course in Volumetric and Gravimetric analysis. Includes techniques, 
stoichiometry, and principles of neutralization, oxidation, and precipitation methods, 
and the chemistry of representative loboratory determinations. 

Mr. Hentz 

CH 401 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 215 

Structure of matter, periodic system, electronic structure and chemical bonding, acids, 
bases salts, preparation of elements, halogen compounds, hydrides and carbonyls. 

Messrs. White, Jennings, Hentz 

CH 421, 422 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 5(3-6) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 212 

Aliphatic and oromotic compounds, methods of preparation, purification and identifi- 
cation of compounds: emphasis on structure and mechanism of organic reactions. 

CH 425, 426 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 215 

Structure, preporofion, properties, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic substances. 

Mr. Loeppert 

CH 430 ORGANIC PREPARATIONS 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisites: Three years of Chemistry including Organic Chemistry 

Experiments selected to acquaint the student with advanced methods and techniques in 
the preporofion of organic substances. 

Mr. Loeppert 

CH 451 INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 203 

The fundamental biochemistry of living matter. 

Mr. Sotterfield 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 527 ADVANCED SURVEY OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites Three years of Chemistry including Organic Chemistry 

Underlying principles, interpretotion of mechonisms, limitations in the use of organic 

reactions. 

Mr. Reid 

CH 528 QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 3(1-6) f 

Prerequisites Three years of Chemistry including Orgonic Chemistrv 

A study of class reactions functional groups, seporotion, identification and preporofion 
of derivotives. 

Mr. Reid 

189 



CHEMISTRY 



CH 529 QUANTITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisites: Three years of Chemistry including OrganK Chemistry 

Quantitative determination of corbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, the halogens, sulfur end 
various functional groups in organic materials, with emphasis on semimicro methods. 

Mr. Leoppert 

CH 531, 532 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 202, MA 202 

An Intensive study of the states of motter, solutions, colloids, homogeneous and 
heterogeneous equilibrium, reaction kinetics, electrolysis, conductance, oxidation reactions, 
ionic equilibrium. 

Messrs. Sutton, Jennings 

CH 531 L, 532 L PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 215, PY 202, MA 202 

Laboratory course to accompany lecture work in physical chemistry. 

Messrs. Sutton, Jennings 

CH 533 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 532 

An Intensive study of the structure of atoms and molecules, on Introduction to sta- 
tistics and selected subjects In thermodynamics. 

Messrs. Sutton, Jennings 

CH 537 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS 4 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: Three years of Chemistry including CH 532 

Physical methods of chemical analysis, the instruments employed and the theoretical 
basis for their operation. 

Mr. Lott 

CH 542 COLLOID CHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 426 

Adsorption, preparation, properties, constitution, stobility, and application of sols, gels, 
emulsions, foarms and aerosols; dialysis, Donnan membrane equilibrium. 

Mr. White 

CH 543 RADIOCHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: CH 215 or 212, PY 520 

Chemical techniques applied to separation of radioactive elements and preparation for 
counting. Applications of radioactivity to chemistry. 

Mr. Hentz 

CH 551 GENERAL BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 5 (3-6) f 

Prerequisites: CH 422, or equivalent of three years of Chemistry 

The chemical constitution of living matter. Biochemical processes as well as compounds 
are studied, lectures, laboratory. 

Messrs. Peterson, Simmons 

CH 552 PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Digestion, absorption, metabolism, secretions, and excretions. Laboratory will include 
analysis of blood and urine. 

Mr. Satterfield 

CH 555 PLANT CHEMISTRY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Composition of plants, properties, nature, and classification of plant constituents, changes 
occurring during growth, ripening, and storage of plants or plant products. 

Messrs. Simmons and Ringler 

CH 561 CHEMISTRY OF CARBOHYDRATES AND LIPIDES 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 422 or equivalent of three years of Chemistry 

Classification, composition, distribution, biosynthesis, and metabolism of llpides and 
carbohydrates, onalyis syntheses deterioration, physical properties and chemical re- 
actions are also considered. 

Messrs. Robbinson, Simmons, Smith 

CH 562 CHEMISTRY OF PROTEINS AND NUCLEIC ACIDS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CH 422, CH 551, or equivalent of three years of Chemistry 

Composition, distribution, structure, properties, and metabolism of amino acids, proteins 

ond nucleic acids. 

Messrs. Peterson, Ingram 

CH 572 CHEMISTRY OF THE VITAMIN 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 422, or equivalent of three years of Chemistry 

History, nomenclature, properties, distribution, effects of deficiencies, vitamin values. 

Mr. Satterfield 

190 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CH 601 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 (3.0) f 

Prerequisite: CH 527 

Ahcylic and hctcrocylic compounds macromotecules, standard type reactions. 

Messrs. Reid, Loeppert, Robinson 

CH 602 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 422, 532 

Theoreticol ond physical aspects of Organic Chemistry; relotions between chemical 
constitution and properties. 

Mr. Loeppert 

CH 621 (Al 621) ENZYMES AND INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM 4(3-3) ♦ 

Prerequisites: CH 551 and permission of instructor 

^ l*"i?^j°' *^^ properties ot enzymes and enzyme action, intermediary metabolism of 
carbohydrates, ammo acids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines and porphrins, metabolic 
energy relationships. 

Mr. Tove 

CH 623 (Al 623) BIOLOGICAL ASSAY OF VITAMINS 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: CH 551 or Al 312, ST 511 

Techniques and designs of biological assays for vitamins; the interrelationships of logical 
principles, design, and analysis is emphasized. 

Staff 

CH 631 CHEMICAL RESEARCH Credits by orrongement 

Prerequisites: 36 semester credits in Chemistry. Open to all graduates 

Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of 6 semester 

credits is allowed toward a Master's degree, no limitation on credits in Doctorate 

programs. 

Staff 

CH 641 SEMINAR Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry 

Required of graduate students specializing in Chemistry 
Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to 
chemists are reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two semester credits is allowed toward the Master's Degree, but ony 
number toward the Doctorate. 

Staff 

CH 651 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY Max. 3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry 

Critical study of some special problems in one of the branches of Chemistry, involving 

original investigation together with a survey of pertinent literature. 

Staff 

CH 671, 672 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 532 

The work of 671 will involve a thorough review of the fundamental principles of physical 
chemistry with extension and application of these to the study of the solid state. In 
672 there will be laid down the elements of statistcol mechanics and kinetic theory, 
in terms of which certain topics from 671 will be more exhoustively developed. Solution 
of problems will play on important role in 671. 

Mr. Sutton 

— — — — — — — — — -CIVIL ENGINEERING 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 201 SURVEYING I 3(1-5) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 

Required of sophomores in Civil and Geologicol Engineering and in Landscape 

Architecture 
Elements of plane surveying: taping, transit, level, stodia, plane table, topographic 
surveying and mapping, care and odjustment of instruments; elementary astronomical 
surveying. 

CE 202 SURVEYING II 3 (1 51 s 

Prerequisite: CE 201 \ 1 ^ 

Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering ond in Landscope Architecture 
Construction surveys; earthwork computotions; route surveys; simple, compound parabolic 
ond spiral curves; chainoge equations. ' 



191 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



CE 211 CONSTRUCTION SURVEYING I 3(1-5) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 101 

Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Elements of plane surveying, including field and classroom work with particular emphasis 
on application of plane surveying for construction. 

CE 212 CONSTRUCTION SURVEYING II 3(1-5) s 

Prerequisite: CE 21 1 

Required of sophomores in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Construction layout, line and grade work, earthwork computations, route surveys and 
simple curves, with particular emphasis on construction applications. 

CE 217 FORESTRY SURVEYING 4 (2-6) s 

Prerequisite: MA 1 1 1 

Required of sophomores in Forestry 
Elements of plane and topographic surveying and mapping; U. S. Public Land Surveys; 
curves and earthwork; forestry surveying. 

CE 305, 306 TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING I, II 3 (3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 202 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering 
Transportation systems; elements of railroad, highwoy, traffic and airport engineering; 
physical and mechanical properties of soils that govern their use as engineering materials. 

CE 321 MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY I 2(1-3) f 

Corequisite: EM 321 or EM 343 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction 

Option 
Properties of cementing materials, mortars, concretes, ceramic products, building stones; 
proportioning mortars and concretes; physical properties and performance characteristics 
of timber, plywood, glued construction and timber fastenings; ASTM standards. 

CE 322 MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY II 2(1-3) s 

Prerquisite: CE 321 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction 

Option 
Properties of structural metals, riveted and welded joints; failures of materials; 
significance of test results; selection of working stresses; field methods for measuring 
load, deflection and strain. 

CE 324 ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES I 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EM 31 1 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering 
Stress analysis of . statically determinate beams and framed structures under fixed and 
moving loads; influence line treatment for moving loads; analysis and design of a 
simple truss. 

CE 325 ELEMENTS OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN A 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 334 

Required of seniors in Construction 
Elementary design of plain and reinforced concrete, including continuity problems. 

CE 328 ELEMENTS OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN B 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 325 

Required of seniors in Construction 
Elements of design of steel and timber; simple connections; problems in erection, forms, 
shoring and falsework. 

CE 334 ELEMENTS OF STRUCTUAL ANALYSIS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EM 341 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Analysis of beams and simple framed structures; graphical and analytical methods. 

CE 338 STRUCTURES I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EM 31 1 

Required of juniors in Architecture 
Analysis of simple structures; reactions, shear and moment diagrams; stresses in members 
of framed structures; graphic statics. 

CE 339 STRUCTURES II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CE 338 and EM 321 

Required of juniors in Architecture 
Analysis of indetermediat^ structures; slopes and deflections; analysis of indetermediate 
frames by moment distribution. 



192 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



CE 344 SOIL MECHANICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 305 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering 
Fundamentol stress relations, Mohr's rupture hypothesis, sheoring strength, eorth pressure 
theories, bearing capacity, stobiiity of slopes, hydrostatics, and hydrodynamics of 
ground water. 

CE 351 DETAILS OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 2(2-0) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Required of juniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
Structural systems with particular emphasis on location of equipment. 

CE 357 ESTIMATES AND COSTS A 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Required of juniors in Construction 
Analysis of construction plans ond specifications; preparation of quantity surveys; ap- 
proximote and detailed estimates of projects. 

CE 358 ESTIMATES AND COSTS B 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 357 

Required of juniors in Construction 
Preparation of complete cost estimates of construction projects; bidding procedures; 
preparation of bids. 

CE 361 ESTIMATES AND COSTS I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Interpretation of working drowings; analysis of construction plans and specifications; 
approximate and detailed estimates of costs. 

CE 362 ESTIMATES AND COSTS II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 361 

Required of luniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Preparation of complete cost estimates of construction projects; bidding procedures and 
preparation of bids. 

CE 367 PROJECT PLANNING AND CONTROL A 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequsiite: CE 358 

Required of seniors in Construction 
Studies of performance characteristics of construction equipment; analysis of plant lay- 
out requirements. 

CE 368 PROtFCT PLANNING AND CONTROL B 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 367 

Required of seniors in Construction 
Complete orgonizotion analysis and scheduling of construction projects. 

CE 382 HYDRAULICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 312 

Required of juniors in Civil Engineering 
Prop>erties of fluids and mechonics of fluid flow in pipes and open channels; theory of 
design and characteristics of pumps and hydroulic motors; measurement of fluid flow. 

CE 390 INTRODUCTION TO SANITARY ENGINEERING 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite CH 102 

Elective 
Survey of sonitary engineering. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 425 ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES II 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: CE 324 and EM 321 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 
Deflection of beams ond trusses; indeterminate stress analysis by moment area slope 
deflection and moment distribution. 

CE 427 STRUCTURAL DESIGN I 4(3-3) f 

Corequisite CE 425 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 
Analysis ond design of reinforced concrete building elements; design of tension, com- 
oression and s^mole flcvuro' "■ cube's of stee' and of timber. 

CE 428 STRUCTURAL DESIGN li 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisite: CE 427 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 
Design specifications; connection detoils; independent and complete design of engineering 
structures. 

193 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



CE 433 ELEMENTS OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite; CE 334 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Elements of indeterminote analysis and design of plain and reinforced concrete. 

CE 434 ELEMENTS OF STRUCTURAL DESIGN II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 433 

Required of seniors In Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Desicn of tension, compression and flexural elements of steel and timber; solution of 
problems in erection, forms, shoring and falsework. 

CE 435 STRUCTURES III 3(2-2) f 

Prerequisite: CE 339 

Required of seniors in Architecture 
Principles of steel and timber design. 

CE 436 STRUCTURES IV 4 (2-4) s 

Prerequisite: CE 435 

Required of seniors in Architecture 
Principles of reinforced concrete design and elements of foundations. 

CE 443 FOUNDATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 433 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Identificotion and classification of soils; geological aspects of foundation engineering; 
method of Investigating subsoil conditions; control of water; types of foundations and 
conditions favoring their use; legal aspects of foundation engineering. 

CE 461 PROJECT PLANNING AND CONTROL I 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 362 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Analysis of construction plant layout requirements and performance characteristics of 
equipment. 

CE 462 PROJECT PLANNING AND CONTROL II 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 461 

Required of seniors In Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Scheduling, analysis and control of construction projects. 

CE 464 LEGAL ASPECTS OF CONTRACTING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option; elective 
Legal aspects of construction contract documents and specifications; owner-engineer- 
-contractor relationships and responsibilities; bids and contract performance; labor laws. 

CE 481 HYDROLOGY AND DRAINAGE 2(2-0) f 

Prerequisite: EM 312 

Required of seniors In Civil Engineering 
Occurrence and distribution of rainfall; runoff, surface and ground waters; design of 
drainage and control structures. 

CE 482 WATER AND SEWAGE WORKS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering 
Water supply analysis and design, including population estimotes, consumption, source 
election, adequate, distribution systems ond pumping stations; elements of water treat- 
ment; collection and disposal of sewage; elements of sewage treatment. 

CE 485 ELEMENTS OF HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: EM 342 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Elements of fluid mechanics, hydraulics and hydrology, with oppllcation to problems in 
construction engineering. 

CE 492,493 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I, II 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Professional engineering societies and their functions; professional standords; topics of 
current interest to the civil engineer. 

CE 497,498 ENGINEERING CONSULTATION 2(1-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Fifth-year standing 

Required of fifth-year students in Architecture 
Discussion of engineering problems in architecture. 



194 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 507 AIRPHOTO ANALYSIS I 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite; Junior standing 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils and surfoce 
drainogc characteristics. 

CE 508 AIRPHOTO ANALYSIS II 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 507 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs for highway and airport projects. 

CE 510 ADVANCED SURVEYING 3(2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 202 y 1 » 

Elements of astronomical, geodetic and photogrammetric surveying; coordinate systems 
and map projections. 

CE 513 MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING I 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Municipal engineering functions, planning and operating procedures. 

CE 514 MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING II 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 513 

Special problems relating to public work, public utilities, urban planning, and city 

engineering. 

CE 515 TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS 3(3-0) t 

Prerequisite: CE 306 

An analysis of the development and operation of transportation industries. 

CE 516 TRANSPORTATION PLANNING 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CE 515 

Transportation planning as related to the transportation industry, to urban planning and 
to land usage. 

CE 521,522 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN I, II 3(2-3) t s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Complete structural designs of a variety of projects; principles of limit and prestress 

design. 

CE 524 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF MASONRY STRUCTURES 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Analysis and design of orches, culverts, dams, foundations and retaining walls. 

CE 531 EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Principles and methods of expcrimcntol analysis; dimensional analysis; applications to 
full-scale structures. 

CE 532 STRUCTURAL LABORATORY 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisite: CE 531 

Test procedures and limitotions and interpretation of experimental results. 

CE 544 FOUNDATION ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 344 

Subsoil investiqations excavations; design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of 
water; footing, qrillaqe and pile foundations; caisson and cofferdam methods of con- 
struction; legal aspects of foundation engincerig. 

CE 547 FUNDAMENTALS OF SOIL MECHANICS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 321 

Physical and mechanical properties of soiis governing their use for engineering purposes; 

stress relotions and opplications to a variety of fundamental problems. 

CE 548 SOIL TESTING FOR ENGINEERING PURPOSES 3 to 6 (arronqe) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 344 or CE 547 

Qualitotive and quantitative soil testing procedures for engineering purposes. 

CE 570 SANITARY MICROBIOLOGY 3(2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 412 

Dynomics of disinfection and bocteriostosis; microbiology of water and sewage and of 

sewage treatment processes. 

CE 571 THEORY OF WATER AND SEWAGE TREATMENT 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Study of the physical and chemical principles underlying water ond sewoge treatment 
processes; diffusion of gases, solubility, equilibrium and ionization, anaerobic ond aerobic 
stabilization processes, sludge conditioning and disposal. 

195 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 



CE 572 UNIT OPERATIONS AND PROCESS IN SANITARY ENGINEERING 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisite: CE 571 

Processes and operations in sanitary engineering; sedimentation, aeration, filtration, 
adsorption, coagulation, softening, sludge digestion, aerobic treatment of sewage. 

CE 573 ANALYSIS OF WATER AND SEWAGE 3(1-6) f 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Chemical and physical analysis of water and sewage and interpretation of results. 

CE 591,592 CIVIL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Discussions and reports of subjects in civil engineering and allied fields. 

CE 598 CIVIL ENGINEERING PROJECTS 1 to 6 (arrange) f s 

Special projects in some phases of civil engineering. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 601,602 ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING I, II 3(3-0) f s 

Corequisite: CE 51 5 

Analysis of the engineering aspects of traffic and transportation problems. 

CE 603 TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING DESIGN I 3 (2-3) f 

Corequisite: CE 601 

The basic elements of traffic and transportotion engineering design. 

CE 604 TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING DESIGN II 3 to 6 (arrange) s 

Prerequisite: CE 603 

Corequisite: CE 516 
The analysis, planning and design of major transportation engineering projects. 

CE 621,622 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I, II 3 (30) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Analysis of rigid frames and continuous structures; treatment of redundant members and 
secondary stresses. 

CE 624 THEORY AND DESIGN OF ARCHES, THIN SHELLS AND DOMES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 621 

Corequisite; EM 602 
Analysis and design of hinged and rigid arches of both frome and rib construction; and 
of thin shells and domes. 

CE 626 STRUCTURAL CONNECTIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: CE 621 

Analysis of stresses in simple, rigid ond semi-rigid connections; critical review of 

specifications. 

CE 641,642 ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 344 or 

Corequisite- CE 547 
Theories of soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction between solids and 
water, and problems in elasticity pertaining to earthwork engineering. 

CE 643 HYDRAULICS OF GROUND WATER 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CE 344 or 547 

Principles of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized porous media; 
the flow net soluticn; seepage and well problems. 

CE 671 ADVANCED WATER SUPPLY AND SEWERAGE 4 (3-3) f 

Prerequisite: CE 482 

Problems relating to the design of water supply and sewerage works. 

CE 672 ADVANCED WATER AND SEWAGE TREATMENT 4 (3-3)s 

Prerequisite: CE 482 

Problems relating to the treatment of water and sewage. 

CE 673 INDUSTRIAL WATER SUPPLY AND WASTE DISPOSAL 3 (3-0) f s 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Woter requirements of industry and the disposal of industrial wostes. 

CE 674 STREAM SANITATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Biological, chemical ond hydroloqicol factors that effect stream sanitation and stream 

use. 

CE 698 CIVIL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Independent investigation of an advanced civil engineering problem; o report of such on 
investigation is required as o nraduate thesis. 

196 



_ —DAIRY MANUFACTURING (ANIMAL INDUSTRY] 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

DM 400 PLANT EXPERIENCE Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Approval of adviser 

Practice in processing dairy products, including milk, ice cream, cheese, butter, and 
concentrated milks; application of laboratory control; and practice in dairy equipment 
maintenance. Required of all Dairy Manufacturing majors, unless proof of equivalent 
experience can be shown. 

Staff 

DM 401 MARKET MILK AND RELATED PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Principles and information on the production, processing, distribution, and public health 
control of fluid milk and related products. 

Messrs. Roberts, Blanton 

DM 402 CHEESE 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor 

Principles and practice in the manufacture and curing of various types of cheese; im- 
portance and propagation of cheese starters. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 403 ICE CREAM AND RELATED FROZEN DAIRY FOODS 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Choice, preparation, and processing of ingredients and freezing of ice cream and other 
frozen desserts. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 404 BUTTER AND DAIRY BY-PRODUCTS 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

A study of the fundamento's of buttermaking, and the principles of manufacturing 
concentrated and dried milks. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 405 DAIRY MECHANICS 1 (0-3) f 

Prerequisite: Dairy Engineering, AGE 331 

Laboratory proctice In the operation and maintenonce of dairy plant equipment and 
refrigeration systems; molfunctions of electrical systems; installation of sanitary milk 
lines, and water lines. 

Mr. Blanton 

DM 406 JUDGING DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 (0-3) s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Milk and dairy products judging according to official standards and commercial grades. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 407 DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY I 4 (2-4) f 

Prerequisite: General Bacteriology, BO 412 

Applications of the principles of bacteriology to the production of quality milk and main- 
tenance of quality in processing milk and milk products; various desirable and undesirable 
octivities of bacteria in milk; methods of enumerating bocteria: detecting certain groups 
of bacteria of particular importance; and the relationships of bacteria in milk to public 
health. 

Mr. Speck 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DM 501 ADVANCED DAIRY TECHNOLOGY 3(1-6) f 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

The functions and operations of o dairy control laboratory; a comprehensive study of 
methods of analyses of doiry products and related non-doiry products; the applicotion 
end interpretations of methods for quality and composition control of dairy products. 

Mr. Warren 

DM 504 DAIRY PLANT MANAGEMENT 4(3-2) s 

Prerequisite Approval of instructor 

Business and factory management practices as used in the dairy plant. 

Mr. Roberts 



197 



DESIGN 



DM 506 DArRY BACTERIOLOGY II 3 (0-6) s 

Prerequisite: Dairy Bacteriology I, DM 407, or consent of instructor 

A detailed study of bacteria particularly involved in the dairy industry regarding their 
physiology, morphology, and cultural characteristics with application to practical dairy 
farm and plant problems. 

Mr. Speck 

DM 508 DAIRY CHEMISTRY 3(1-4) f 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

A qualitative study of the physical, colloidal, and chemical properties of milk and its 

constituents. 

Mr. Aurand 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

DM 601 SEMINAR IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 1 (1-0) f s 

1 credit per term 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Dairy Manufacturing 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest are 
reviewed and discussed. A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, 
but any number toward the Doctorate. 

Staff 

DM 602 ADVANCED DAIRY CHEMISTRY 4 f s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

A quantitative study of the physcial, colloidal, and chemical properties of milk and its 

constituents. 

Mr. Aurand 

DM 603 ADVANCED DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY 4 f s 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor 

Industrial fermentations used or applicable in the utilization of surplus milk and milk 
products. The student conducts various fermentations and makes the requisite chemical 
and biological measurements in order to determine yields and efficiency of the process. 

Mr. Speck 

DM 604 TOPICAL PROBLEMS IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING 1 to 3 credits per term 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Dairy Manufacturing 

Special problems in various phases of dairy manufacturing. A maximum of six credits 

is allowed. 

Staff 

DM 605 RESEARCH IN DAIRY MANUFACTURING Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Dairy Manufacturing 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's Degree; no limitation on credits 

in Doctorate programs. 

Staff 



DESIGN 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

DN 101, 102 DESIGN I, II 3(3-6) f s 

Required of all first year students in the School of Design 

Introduction to the elements and expression of two and three dimensionol design in- 
volving a variety of tools, materials, and techniques. Orientation of historical and con- 
temporary concepts of art and architecture. 

Messrs. Gussow and Laskey 

DN 111,112 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING I, II 3 (0-4) f s 

Required of all first year students in the School of Design 

Problems in analysis of visual perception with emphasis placed on the various systems 
man has developed to reduce visual experience into a two dimensional frame of refer- 
ence. Freehand studies from nature as a means of studying drawing methods. 

Messrs. Cox and Stuart 

DN 201,202 DESIGN III, IV 4(3-6) f, 5(3-6) s 

Prerequisite: DN 102 

Required of all second year students in the School of Design 
The design sequence for this year seeks the solutions of problems which will tax the 
student's imaginative powers without making unreasonable demands on his newly gained 
technical abilities. Emphosis is placed on the architectural application of more general 
design principles to which the student has been previously exposed. 

Messrs. Stuart end Elliott 

198 



ECONOMICS 

DN 211.212 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING III, IV 2(0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 1 I 2 

Required of oil second yeor students in the School of Design 
Problems involving both analysis and synthesis whereby the student continues with the 
studies begun in the freshman year with the added element of learning to create images 
of possible visual experience wholly from imaginative process. 

Messrs. Stuart and Adams 

DN 311.312 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING V. VI 2(0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 212 

Required of all third year students in the School of Design 
Problems involving the creative aspects of drawing, graphic arts, painting and sculpture. 
Type of classwork varies with instructor. 

Messrs. Stuart and Adams 

DN 331,332 HISTORY OF DESIGN I, II 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 102 

Required of all third year students in the School of Design 
A critical study of the civilization of historic people and their contributions in the field 
of Design, (from ancient through medieval times), reloted to architecture, landscape 
architecture and visual aids. 

Messrs. Baumgorten and Elliott 

DN 411, 412 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING VII. VIII 2(0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 312 

Required of all fourth year students in the School of Design 
Continuation, at a more complex level, of work begun in third year. 

Mr. Cox 

DN 422,521 OFFICE PROCEDURE I. II 2(2-0) s f 

Prerequisite: ARC 302 

Required of all fourth ond fifth year students in the School of Design 
A study of the ethics, organization, and procedures of professional architectural proctice; 
specifications, estimates and building codes. 

Mr. Shumaker 

DN 431.432 HISTORY OF DESIGN III. IV 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 332 

Required of all fourth year students in the School of Design 
A continuation of the course DN 332 from the Renoissance Period through the Age of 
Reason till the Middle of the XIX Century. 

Messrs. Baumgorten ond Elliott 

DN 511,512 DESCRIPTIVE DRAWING IX, X 2(0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 412 

Required of all fifth year students in the School of Design 
Continuation of third and fourth year work into "thesis" type activities wherein more 
mature projects may be undertaken. 

Mr. Stuart 

ON S31 HISTORY OF DESIGN V 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: DN 432 

Required of all fifth yeor students in the School of Design 
A critical study of the modern life and design in relation to social and cultural condi- 
tions, based on the spirit of the XIX and XX Centuries. 

Mr. Baumgorten 

DN 541.542 PHILOSOPHY OF DESIGN I, II 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ARC 402 

Required of oil fifth year students in the School of Design 
An introduction to aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to desgin. 

Mr. Komphoefner and Visiting Professors 



ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 



EC 201.202 ECONOMICS 3(3-0) f s 

Fundamental principles applying to the organization and functioning of our economy. 

EC 205 THE ECONOMIC PROCESS 3 (3-0) f s 

An analysis of the process and principles by which on economy allocates resources, 
distributes goods and income and determines rote of growth. 



199 



ECONOMICS 



EC 305 BUSINESS ORGANrZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
A survey ot business organization, operation, ond practices. Special emphosis is given 
to the forms of business enterprises, principles of management, and the relation of the 
business unit to the economic system. 

EC 312 ACCOUNTING FOR ENGINEERS 3(3-0) f s 

A survey of accounting principles; the analysis and recording of business transactions; 
financial statements, their construction, use and interpretation. 

EC 315 SALESMANSHIP 2(2-0) f s 

An introduction to the principles and techniques of selling from the standpoint of the 
Individual salesman. A course designed for the technical student anticipating entering 
the field of distribution. 

EC 350 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 3 (3-0) s 

A study of world resources and industries ond their relationship to trade and manu- 
facturing. Distribution of the principal commodities of world commerce. An analysis of 
the world's important agricultural, industrial and commercial regions. 

EC 354 MANAGING PERSONAL FINANCES 2(2-0) f s 

How to control cash income and outgo so that money goes where it does the best job. 
Use of family time ond talent to increase income and cut expenses; meeting emergencies; 
use and abuse of personal credit; buying or building a house; savings and their uses; 
elementary investments; filling tax returns; trust funds and pensions. 

EC 401,402 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 3(2-2) f s 

Fundamental principles of accounting theoiy and practice; the analysis and recording of 
business transactions; explanation and interpretation of the structure, forms, and use 
of financial statements. 

EC 407 BUSINESS LAW I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite; The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
A course dealing with elementary legal concepts, contracts, agency, negotiable instru- 
ments, sales of personal property, chattel mortgoges, partnerships, corporations surety- 
ship ond bailments, insurance. 

EC 408 BUSINESS LAW II 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite; EC 407 

Deals with real property, mortgages on urban and farm lands, landlord ond tenant, re- 
quirements for valid deed, insurance low, wills, suretyship and conditional sales. 

EC 409 CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTING 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 312 

An introduction to the accounting problems peculiar to a construction organization. An 
analysis of the problems of estimating and ollocating the costs of materials, labor and 
overhead to individual jobs. 

EC 410 MANUFACTURING ACCOUNTING 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisite: EC 312 or EC 401 

An introduction to the accounting problems peculiar to a manufacturing organization. 
An analysis of the problems of estimating and allocating the costs of materials, labor 
and overhead to the various units of product. 

EC 411,412 MARKETING METHODS AND SALES MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) t s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
Marketing institutions and their functions and agencies; retailing; market analysis; 
problems in marketing; elements of sales management with emphasis on planning, opera- 
tions, policies and programs. 

EC 414 TAX ACCOUNTING 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 312 or EC 401 

An analysis of the Federal tax laws relating to the individual and business. Determining 
and reporting income. Payroll taxes and methods of reporting them. Actual practice in 
the preparation of income tax returns. 

EC 415 ADVERTISING 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite; The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
Principles of advertising; purposes; preparation of copy; medio; advertising campaigns; 
legislation. 

EC 419 MONEY AND BANKING 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
A study of the role of money in the economic organization; methods of stabilizing 
the price level; study of the proper organization and functioning of commercial banking, 
and the Federal Reserve system; the problems of monetary standards and credit controls; 
recent monetory and banking trends are emphasized. 

200 



ECONOMICS 



EC 420 CORPORATION FINANCE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite; The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
Financial instruments and capital structure; procuring funds; managing working capital; 
manoging corporate capitalization; finoncial institutions and their work. 

EC 425 INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Junior stondmg 

Principles ond techniques of modern scientific management; relation of finance, morket- 
Ing, industrial relations, occounting, and statistics to production; production plonning ond 
control; onolysis of economic, political, ond social influences on production. 

EC 426 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite; Junior standing 

The scientific management of manpower, from the viewpoint of the supervisor and the 

personnel specialist. A study of personnel policy and a review of the scientific techniques 

regarding the specific problems of employment, training, promotion, transfer, health ond 
safety, employee service, and joint relations. 

EC 431 LABOR PROBLEMS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

An economic approach to lobor problems including wages, hours, working conditions, 
insecurity, substondard workers, minority groups, social security, and public policy relative 
to these problems. 

EC 432 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Collective bargaining. Analysis of basic labor low and its interpretation by the courts 

and governmental agencies. An examination of specific terms of labor contracts ond 

their implications for labor and management. An examination of labor objectives and 

tactics and monogement objectives and tactics. Problems of operating under the labor 

contract. 

EC 436 ECONOMIC FLUCTUATIONS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite; The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
An empirical and theoretical analysis of changes in the level of economic activity. These 
changes will be examined as to causes, extent and timing, ond effects. 

EC 442 EVOLUTION OF ECONOMIC IDEAS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in EconcTiics required by the degree-granting school 

An analysis of the development of economic thought and method during the post two 

centuries. Economics considered as a cumulative body of knowledge, in a context of 

emerging technology, changing institutions, pressing new problems, and the growth of 

science. 

EC 444 ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
A comparative analysis of the functioning of the major economic systems, with emphasis 
upon the woys in which the problem of economic calculation is approached in a variety 
of institutionol settings. 

EC 501 INTERMEDIATE ECONOMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-gronting school 
A systematic theoreticol treatment of the functioning of o modern economy with special 
emphasis upon the pricing system. 

EC 503 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisites The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school, and 

EC 401, 402 
Problems of asset valuation, such as depreciation, replocements, amortization, etc., as 
found in all types of business orgonizations: branch occounting, consolidations, install- 
ment selling. 

EC 504,505 PRINCIPLES OF COST ACCOUNTING 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisites: The basic course m Economics required by the degree-granting school, ond 

EC 401. 402 
Cost finding, moteriols costs, labor costs, overheod costs, etc., with on introduction to 
standard cost procedures 

EC 510 PUBLIC FINANCE 3(3-0) t s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 

A study of fiscal policy and onolysis of the fiscol devices of government, including 

expenditure, taxation, and borrowing. 

EC 514 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite The basic courie in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
An analysis of international economic relotions including trade, investment, and the 
payments problem, with continuing consideration of policy. 

201 



ECONOMICS 



EC 515 INVESTMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-gronting school 
Types of investment; investment market; investment analysis; investment channels; in- 
vestment fluctuations; investment policies and practices. 

EC 518 PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course In Economics required by the degree-granting school 
Risk as an element of oil agricultural and industrial activity; discussion of such risks os 
can be covered by insurance with the appropriate forms of insurance, e.g., employer's 
liability, workmen's compensation, fire, life, ond other forms. 

EC 519 MONETARY THEORY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The bosic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 

A study of the forces determining the value of money; the role of money in economic 

growth and in the maintenance of economic stobility; and a consideration of monetary 

policy. 

EC 521 OFFICE MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Open to seniors and graduate students only 

The application of scientific management principles to office problems including: office 
planning and layout, equipment, filing, correspondence, selection, training and super- 
vision of office employees, promotions and wage increases, office costs and budgets. 

EC 531 MANAGEMENT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
A seminar course designed to round out the technical student's program. Includes a 
survey of the labor movement organization and structure of unions, labor law and public 
policy, the union contract, the bargaining process, and current trends and tendencies \i\ 
the field of collective bargaining. 

EC 540 ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
An introduction to the theory of economic growth and development, with special applica- 
tion to the presently under-developed areas of the world. 

EC 546 NATIONAL INCOME ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the concepts and methods of 
national income analysis; to develop a theoretical framework; and to provide an applica- 
tion to the American Economy. 

EC 548 ECONOMICS OF WELFARE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school 

An analysis of the efficiency of our economy, including resource allocation, rate of 
growth, degree of stabiliry, and income distribution. 

EC 550 MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN ECONOMICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school, 

MA 202 or 212, and consent of the instructor 
An introductory study of economic models emphasizing their formal properties. The theory 
of individual economic units is presented as a special case of the theory of inductive 
behavior. Mathematical discussions of the theory of the consumer, the theory of the 
firm, and welfare economics will show the relevance of such topics as constrained maxima 
and minima, set theory, partially and simply ordered systems, probability theory, and 
game theory to economics. 

EC 555 INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR PROGRAMMING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: The basic course in Economics required by the degree-granting school, and 

MA 202 or 212, and consent of the instructor 
Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation, and organization. Optimal 
combination of integrated productive processes within the firm. Applications In the 
economics of industry and of agriculture. 

EC 601 ADVANCED ECONOMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 501 

A rigorous examination of contemporary economic theory, with special regard to such 
fields as general equilibrium theory, qrowth theory, and organization theory. 

EC 603 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EC 501 or consent of Instructor 

A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic thought, designed 
in part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate perspective for the understanding 
of contemporary economics. 

EC 605 RESEARCH IN ECONOMICS Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Individual research in economics, under staff supervision and direction. 



202 



EDUCATION 



Agricultural Education 

Seo pa-cs 175-176 for: ED 101; 102; 201, 313; 411; 412; 413; 430; 554; 558; 563. 
568; 616; 617; 618; 621 and 664 

Industrial Arts and industrial Education 

See pages 236-239 for: ED 100; 345; 422; 440; 460; 482; 483; 516; 521; 525; 527; 
528; 592; 595; 610; 614; 6)9; 624; 627; 630; 635. 

Industrial and Rural Recreation 

Sec pages 231-235. 

Mathematics and Science Education 

Sec pages 246-247 for: ED 470, 471, 475, 476. 

Occupational Information and Guidance 

See pages 257 for: ED 420; 524; 530; 531 590; 631; 633; 641; 651. 



Psychology 

See pages 268-271. 



GENERAL COURSES 

ED 203 AN INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING 2(2-0) s 

A course designed to aid prospective teachers in becoming familiar with the scope and 
purposes of secondary education, the qualification and responsibilities of teachers, the 
relotion of the school to the community, and current problems of secondary school 
teachers. 

Mr. Speece 

ED 308 VISUAL AIDS 2(1-2) s 

Methods ond techniques of visual instruction; lettering; statistical illustration; chart, 
groph, and poster-moking; photography; projector operation, care, and use. 

Mr. Armstrong 

ED 344 SECONDARY EDUCATION 2(1-2) f s 

An overview of secondory education, including development, problems, services, trends, 
teaching profession, role of school in the community, purposes, and objectives. The 
development and status of secondary education in North Carolina is taken up. 

Mr. Tolbert 

ED 410 DRIVER EDUCATION 3(2-2) s 

Course ottered during Summer session only. 

The principles of teaching the basic driving skills, including the new concept of defensive 
driving, observance and interpretation of motor vehicle laws, adverse driving conditions, 
handling of accident situations and care of the car. 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 501 EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: Six hours in education or psychology 

Advanced undergraduates or graduates 
Discussion of principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child with mojor 
interest on the mentolly hondicopped and slow learner. Proctice will be given in curricu- 
lum instruction for groups of children, individual techniques for dealing with retarded 
children in the overage classroom. Opportunity for individual work with on exceptional 
child will be provided. 

Mr. Corter 

ED 502 ANALYSIS OF READING ABILITIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: Six hours in education or psychology 

A study of tests and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study of reading 

retardotion and foctors underlying reading difficulties. 

Mr. Rust 



203 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



ED 503 IMPROVEMENT OF READING ABILITIES 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Six hours in education or psychology 

A study of methods used in developing specific reading skills or in overcoming certain 
reading difficulties; a study of methods used in developing pupil vocabulories and work 
anolysis skills; a study of how to control vocobulary burden of reading material. 

ED 505 GROUP DYNAMICS IN TEACHING 3 (Summer only) 

Prerequisites: Six hours in education or psychology 

A study of group methods in teaching with special reference to role ploying, conference 
techniques, and group dynamics in their application to teaching and an understanding 
of the student's behavior. 

Mr. Solem 

ED 509 WORKSHOP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 3-6(1-4) s 

Prerequisite: Three hours in special education and a teaching certificate 
The workshop in special education combines a practicum in special education with work 
on individual projects in a workshop situation. Wide latitude is given to teachers to work 
in areas of special interests or need. In addition to usual group meetings, materials are 
collected in handbook form each year for teachers use. 

Mr. Corter 

ED 510 ADVANCED DRIVER EDUCATION 3(2-2) s 

The study of course content in present day driver education courses: Evaluation of re- 
search literature in driver educotion; a study of existing driver education programs at 
both secondary ond college levels; and evaluation of psychological and educational re- 
search in accidents. 

ED 552 INDUSTRIAL ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 (Summer) 

Prerequisites: Twelve credits in education and consent of instructor 

This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principals understand how tools 
and materials and industrial processes may be used to vitalize and supplement the 
elementary school children's experiences. Practical children's projects along with the 
building of classroom equipment. 

Mr. Schmitt 

ED 615 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH 3 (3-0) f 

An introductory course for students preparing for an advanced degree. The purposes are: 
to assist the student in understanding the meaning and purpose of educational research 
and the research approach to problems; to develop students' ability to identify educa- 
tional problems, and to plan and carry out research to solve these problems; to aid in the 
preparation of the research report. Special attention is given to tools and methods of 
research. Consideration is also given to the educators as a consumer of research. 

Mr. Tolbert 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING— — — — — — — — 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 201 ELEMENTARY CIRCUITS AND FIELDS 4(2-5) f s 

Co-requisite: MA 201 

Required of sophomores in EE 
Fundamental laws of electric circuits and magnetic circuits. Problem drill and laboratory 
exercises. 

Staff 

EE 202 ELEMENTARY CIRCUITS AND FIELDS 4 (2-5) s 

Prerequisite: EE 201 

Required of sophomores in EE 
A continuation of EE 201. Introduction to simple circuit transients and steady-state 
olternoting-current circuit theory. Fundamental laws of magnetic fields and electric 
fields. Problem drill and laboratory exercises. 

Staff 

EE 301,302 INTERMEDIATE CIRCUITS AND FIELDS 4(2-5) f 

3 (2-2) s 
Prerequisite: EE 202, PY 202, MA 202 

Required of Juniors in EE 
An intermediate treatment of lumped-constant alternating-current circuits in the steady 
state. Single- and three-phase circuits. Discussion of electric and magnetic fields, distri- 
buted constants, and traveling waves. The theory of transmission lines at power ond 
audio frequencies. Filters and impedance matching. One three-hour laboratory per week 
is included in the first semester. 

Staff 

204 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



EE 305, 306 ELECTRICAL MACHINERY 4 (2-5! f s 

Prerequisites; EE 202 for EE 305; EE 301 for EE 306 

Required of Juniors in EE 
A clossroom and laboratory study of the principles, performonce, and characteristics of 
direct current and alternating current machinery. 

Staff 

EE 310 ILLUMINATION 3(2-3) t 

Prerequisites: EE 301 or EE 320 or EE 331 

A classroom ond laboratory study of the principles involved in the production and 
utilizotion of light from artificial sources; a study of the requirements for good lighting; 
and design of lighting installations for schools and industry. Two hours recitation and 
one three-hour laboratory or problem period per week. 

Mr. Winkler 

EE 320 ELEMENTS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 4(3-3) f s 

Prerequisites MA 202, PY 202 

Required of seniors in AER, AGE, CRE, CHE, GEE, IE, CE. and NE 
Principles, characteristics and operotion of electric equipment ond systems. Theory and 
problems in applied electricity; motor characteristics and industrial applications. Three 
hours of lecture and ono three-hour laboratory or recitation per week. 

Staff 

EE 331,332 PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 4(3-3) f s 

Prerequisites MA 202, PY 202 

Required of seniors in EPY and ME 
Basic concepts, electrical power generation and utilization circuit elements, single and 
polyphase a.c. circuits, transformers, rotating electrical machines. Fundamentals of Elec- 
tronics and control circuits. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour recitation or 
laboratory per week. 

Staff 

EE 341,342 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY 4(3-2) f s 

Prerecuisites: PY 211, 212 

Required of juniors in Heating and Air Conditioning curriculum. 
A study of the basic electric circuits and machinery with emphasis on single phase and 
three phase power and energy relations, the performonce, maintenance, and applications 
of motors and transformers; motor control; rules for wiring as specified by the Notional 
Electric Code. (Three hours work lecture ond three hours work recitation or laboratory 
per week.) 

Stoff 

EE 350 ELECTRICAL APPLICATIONS IN WOOD PRODUCTS MANUFACTURING 3 (2-2) 

Prerecuisites: PY 21 I, 212 

Required of juniors in Pulp and Paper Technology curriculum 
Optional for juniors or seniors in Furniture Manufocturing and Management 
A study of electrical power applications in the pulp and paper industries, and in furniture 
monufocturing. Includes o.c. ond d.c. circuits; single phase and polyphose power and 
energy measurements; d.c. ond o.c. motors; ond control systems. Two hours recitation 
ond one three-hour loborotory or problem per week. 

Staff 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 411,412 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Required of seniors in Electrical Engineering 
Weekly meetings for the delivery ond discussion of student papers on topics of current 
interest in Electrical Engineering. 

Staff 

EE 414 ELECTRON TUBES 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: EE 301, MA 202 
Required of juniors in EE 
A study of the fundamentals of electrical conduction in vacuum and goses. Operating 
characteristics of vacuum and gaseous tubes, mercury ore retifiers, photoelectric cells, 
cothode-roy oscilloscopes, etc. Introduction to vacuum tube circuit theory. One loborotory 
period a week illustrates the theory covered during lecture ond recitation periods. 

Staff 

EE 416 CENTRAL STATIONS 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: EE 306 

Location and loyout of power stations. Costs of generoting, transmitting, and distributing 
electric energy. Economic selection and opcrotioni of electrical equipment. Rote-moking, 
federal regulation. 

Mr. Fouroker 



205 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 501,502 ADVANCED ELECTRIC CIRCUITS AND FIELDS 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: EE 302, MA 401 
Required of seniors in EE 
A continuation of the study of electric circuits and fields. Consideration of the transient 
state in electrical circuits, transformation techniques for the solution of problems. Applica- 
tion of classical electric one m.agnetic field theory to the problems of electrical engineer- 
ing, using vector analysis. 

Mr. Gouster 

EE 510 HIGH VOLTAGE LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisites: EE 302, PY 401 

A laboratory course in the techniques of producing and handling high voltages. Corona, 
surfoce discharge, breakdown, and other phenomena are studied. Typical high voltage 
tests are performed on dielectrics. 

Mr. Gauster 

EE 511,512 ELECTRIC COMMUNICATIONS 4(3-3) t s 

Prerequisites: EE 302, 414 

Required of EE seniors not taking EE 513, 514 
A classroom and laboratory study of the circuits and equipment involved in radio and 
wire communication: circuit elements, vacuum tube and transistor and oscillators, modula- 
tion, detection, antennas and radio propagation. Emphasis is on design and quantitative 
analysis. 

Mr. Carson 

EE 513,514 ELECTRIC POWER ENGINEERING 4(3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: EE 302 

Required of EE seniors not taking EE 511, 512 
Long distance transmission of power. Line parameters by the method of geometric 
mean distances. Circle diagrams, symmetrical components, and fault calculations, 
elementary concepts of power system stobility. Prime movers, bus systems, and switchgear. 
Loads ond the selection of motors for various industrial applications. One three-hour 
laborotory per week accompanies the classroom study. 

Mr. Stevenson 

EE 515 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS AND CONTROL 4(3-3) f 
Prerequisites: EE 306, 414 

A study, with loboratory tests, of the application of electronic devices to industrial 

processes and equipment outside of the field of communications. Speed and voltage 

control; timing devices; electronics heating; air purification; production and quality 
control; photo electric devices. 

Staff 

EE 516 FUNDAMENTALS OF SERVOMECHANISMS 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: MA 401, and either EE 302 or 322 

Dynamics and synthesis of closed-loop control systems using transient and sinusoidal 

analyses. Applications to electrical, mechanical ond chemical systems. One two-hour 

laboratory or problem period per week, to supplernent the classroom work. 

£.CS\% ^*.^.4.C.«-3tA*J> VV^«A.. Va^ .Staff 

EE 605,606 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 1(1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in EE 

A series of papers and conferences participated in by the Instructional staff, invited 

guests, and students who are candidates for advanced degrees. 

Graduate Staff 

EE 611,612 COMMUNICATION NETWORKS 4(4-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EE 302, 501 

Steady state and transient performance of the generolized network. Analysis and 
synthesis of two-and four-terminal reactive networks. Wave filters and phase equalizers. 
Networks containing resistances and reoctonces. Feedback systems, such as feedback 
amplifiers, regulators, and servomechanisms. The study includes both the analyis and 
the synthesis of such systems, in terms of transient and steady-state response, using 
mathematical methods based on the theory of the complex variable. 

Mr. Hoadley 

EE 615 ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES 4(3-3)1 

Prerequisite; EE 502 

Maxwell's Equations applied to a study of the propagation of energy by electromagnetic 
waves. Vector and scalar potentials, retarded potentials, reflection and refraction 
power flow and energy density; plane rectangular and cylindrical wave guides; lines and 
cavity resonators. Laboratory on microwave techniques and measurements. 

Mr. Carson 

206 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

EE 616 ADVANCED RADIO ENGrNEERING 4(3-3) i 

Prerequisites: EE 512, 615 

Anolysis and design of microwave transmitting, receiving and measuring systems. Elec- 
tronic methods of pulsing, timing, counting, gating and computing with applications to 
communication, navigation, radar and computer systems. Theory and application of 
klystrons, magnetrons, and troveling-wave tubes. Laboratory emphosizes non-sinusoidal 
electronic circuitry. 

Mr. Carson 

EE 618 RADIATION AND ANTENNAS 4(3-3) i 

Prerequisite: EE 61 5 

Electromagnetic wave theory applied to antennas ond antenna rays. Calculation and 
measurement of directionol characteristics and field intensity. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 621 VACUUM TUBE DESIGN 3(3-0) i 

Prerequisite: EE 512, 615 and MA 61 I 

An intensive analytic study of the laws of electron emission and motion and the design 
of vacuum tubes. Poisson's equation and conformol transformations ore used to develop 
design criteria and equations. Analytic and experimental methods for determining 
potential fields ore studied. Construction and high vacuum practice ore covered. 

Mr. Barclay 

EE 622 ELECTRON OPTICS AND TRANSIT TIME EFFECTS 4(3-3) s 

Prerequisite: EE 621 

The equivolent noise generator circuit is applied to the various sources of noise in 
vacuum tubes. Electrostatic and magnetic lens action. Transit time in high frequency 
tubes and velocity modulated tubes, magnetrons, cathode ray and photoelectric tubes. 

Mr. Borcloy 

EE 631,632 ADVANCED ELECTRIC MACHINERY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EE 306 

An advanced study of electrical machine theory. Equivalent circuits of transformers and 
rotating machines. Operation under abnormal conditions: unbalanced voltages, harmonics, 
fault currents, stobility, etc. Applications to design problems. 

Mr. Eckels 

EE 635,636 DIELECTRIC THEORY AND HIGH VOLTAGE ENGINEERING 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EE 41 4 

High Voltage measurement methods, theory and experimental investigations of dielectric 
properties of insulating materials (gases, liquids, solids). Problems involved with technical 
applications (design of insulators, corona losses of high voltage lines, circuit breaker 



theory). 



Mr. Gauster 



EE 637,638 POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EE 51 4 

An odvanced study of symmetrical components applied to the general unbalonced three- 
phase circuit. Sequence self and mutual impedances. Power system stability studies with 
emphasis on the transient case. 

Mr. Stevenson 

EE 643 ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS 2(2-0) f 

Prerequisites: EE 302, 414 

A critical analysis of circuits used in electrical measurements, with special attention to 
such topics as balonce convergence, effects of strays, sensitivity, ond use of feedback 
in electronic devices. 

Mr. Hoodley 

EE 645,646 ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EE 615 or PY 602 

A comprehensive study of electricity and magnetism, emphasizing dynamic field theory. 
Potential theory, boundary-volue problems, electrostatics and mognetostatics, transients 
in continuous systems, electromagnetic theory of light. 

Mr. Gauster 

EE 650 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in EE and opproval of adviser 
Individual research in the tick) of Electrical Enamccnna. 

Graduate Advisers 

EE 661,662 SPECIAL STUDIES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in EE and approval of adviser 

This course provides an opportunity for small groups of advanced groduate students to 
study, under the direction of qualified members of the professionol staff, odvanced topics 
in their special fields of Interest. 

Groduote Staff 

207 



ENGINEERING — _ — — — — — ____ 

E 100 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING 1 (1-0) f 

Introduces the student to the profession of engineering and the characteristics and re- 
quirements of the study of engineering. 

Mr. Lampe 

E 500 ENGINEERING ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and selection for Honor's Program in Engineering 
This is an engineering "case method" experience, making use of the principles of engi- 
neering, physics, and mathematics. Professors in Engineering and certain key individuals 
from industry will work singly with the professor in charge to introduce challenging 
engineering situations and lo stimulate student analysis. 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS— ____ _ __ 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EM 311 MECHANICS I (STATICS) 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 201 or 211; MA 201 or 21 1 

Study of the analytical and graphical solution for the resultant and equilibrium of con- 
current, parallel, and non-concurrent non-parollel force systems under coplanar or non- 
copianor conditions. The application of statics to pin connected members, trusses and 
cables; friction; centroids; and moments of inertia. Shear and bending moment equations 
and diagrams. 

EM 312 MECHANICS II (DYNAMICS) 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 31 1 

The kinematic and kinetic study of motion of particles and rigid bodies; absolute and 
relative motion; Coriolis Law; methods of force, mass and acceleration; work and 
energy; impulse and momentum. Variable motion, simple harmonic motion, simple 
balancing of rotating parts. 

EM 321 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS I 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 31 1 

Simple stresses and strains in tension, compression, shear ond torsion; external cross 
shear and bending moments in beams; internal stresses in beam and their distribution 
throughout the cross section; design of beams; slope and deflection of beams; statically 
indeterminate reactions of restrained beams; study of stresses at a point by Mohr's circle; 
column theory; design of axially and eccentrically loaded columns. 

EM 341 MECHANICS A (STATICS) 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 201 or 21 1 and MA 201 or 21 1 

Forces, resultants and equilibrium of concurrent, parallel and non-concurrent non-parallel 
force systems; statics applied to engineering problems and the solution of stress in simple 
trusses. Centroids and moments of inertia. This course is a condensation of EM 31 and 
with less emphasis. 

EM 342 MECHANICS B (DYNAMICS) 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 341 or 31 1 

The kinematic and kinetic study of motion of particles ond rigid bodies; absolute and 
relative motion. Methods of force, mass and acceleration; work and energy impulse and 
momentum. This course is a condensation of EM 312 and with less emphasis. 

EM 343 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS A 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 31 1 or 341 

Axial and shear stresses and strains; pure torsion of circular shafts; external shears ond 
moments; the distribution of internal shearing and bending stresses; introduction to 
deflection theory; column theory; design of oxiolly loaded columns. 

EM 430 FLUID MECHANICS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 312 or 342 

Fluid statics, kinematics, Bernoulli equation, momentum, free-surface flow, viscosity, pipe 
friction, drag on submerged bodies, lift, elastic wave propogation. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EM 531 HYDRAULIC MACHINERY 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 430 

Theory of lift and application to propellers, fans; blade theory including generalized 
Bernoulli equation, angular impulse, and angular momentum; forced and free vortex; 
impulse, reaction, and propeller turbines; positive displacement pumps, centrifugal pumps; 
propagation in pipes and surge tanks; fluid couplings and torque converters. 

208 



ENGLISH 



EM 551 ADVANCED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 321 

Stresses and strains at a point by Mohr's circle; rosette anolysis; stresses in eccentricolly 
looded joints; membrane stresses in shells; stress theories; linear deflection of trusses; 
stresses incurved bars; steel ond rubber springs; composite beams. 

EM 554 VIBRATION PROBLEMS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 321; MA 401 

Free vibrations without damping; natural frequency; forced vibrations without damping; 
baloncing of rotating and reciprocating machinery; free vibrations with damping; forced 
vibrations with damping: vibration of systems with several degrees of freedom; shock 
and sound isolation; opplicotion of isolators. 

EM 556 ADVANCED MECHANICS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 312 

Virtual work; stability; balancing; elastic impact and waves; governors; LoGrongian 
equations of motion- three-dimensional dynamics of rigid body gyroscopes derivation 
from Kepler's laws of Newton's law of gravitation. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EM 601 APPLIED ANALYSIS IN STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3 (3-0) t s 

Prerequisites: EM 321; MA 401 

Linear and ongulor deflections of trusses and beams; superposition; redundant reactions 
of statically indeterminate trusses and beams; stresses in thin-webbed curved beams; 
stresses in square and curved knees; torsion in rolled profiles; design of beams for bending 
and torsion; curved beams with load normal to the place of curvature; spoce framework; 
infinite, semi-infinite beams on elostic foundations. 

EM 602 THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ELASTICITY 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 321; MA 401 

Buckling by torsion and flexure; lateral instability of beams and beam-columns; tapered 
and built-up columns; local failures; the four-moment theorem; stresses in circular ond 
rectangulor plates; stress concentrations. In the above topics, theory is developed and 
the resulting equations solved by classical or numericol methods. Results ore compared 
with leading design specifications. 

EM 605 RESEARCH IN STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3 (3-0) f s 

Special problems and investigations. 

EM 606 RESEARCH IN MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS 3(3-0) f s 

Special problems in investigations. 

EM 607 RESEARCH IN FLUID MECHANICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Special prob'ems m investigations. 

EM 608 ADVANCED FLUID MECHANICS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: EM 430 

Potentiol motion: vortex theory; Navier-Stokes equations; theories of turbulence; theory 
of boundary layer; boundary separation; unsteady flow vibrations of fluids. 

EM 610 ENGINEERING MECHANICS SEMINAR 1 d-O) f s 

Reports, discussions, ond proporotion of papers. 

EM 611 SIMILITUDE FOR ENGINEERS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: EM 321, 430 

Standard deviation and rejection of dota; dimensional onolysis, Buckinghom Pi Theorem, 
theory of models; structurol models, distorted structural models, fluid flow models, thermal 
models; analog? and the:r use in engineering experimentation. 



-ENGLISH 



FRESHMAN ENGLISH 



ENG 100 ENGLISH REFRESHER 3(3-0) f s 

A course for students deficient in English Special attention will be given to individual 
problems m grammar, reading, and writing. Note: Though the course is bosicolly non- 
credit, arrongements will be made to give credit for English 111 to students who 
demonstrote sufficient progress and are willing to do additional work. This course is 
offered eoch semester. No student will be allowed to schedule it for more thon one 
semester. 

209 



ENGLISH 



ENG 111,112 COMPOSITION (BASIC COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS) 3 (3-0) f s 

Required of all freshmen 

Intensive practice in composition, with review in grammor and usage; reading and 
analysis of basic types of communication, with primary emphasis on comprehension; 
directed supplementary reoding; oral and written reports; conferences. 

WRITING 

ENG 211 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 1 12 

Practical application of the principles of composition to effective business communica- 
tions, including basic types of correspondence and reports. Special attention will be poid 
to vocabulary building, and work will be given in oral business communicotions. 

ENG 215 PRINCIPLES O' NEWS AND ARTICLE WRITING 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 1 12 

Introduction to the writing of simple news articles; class criticism of non-technical 

newspaper and magazine articles. 

ENG 216 ADVANCED ARTICLE WRITING 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ENG 1 12 and 215 or equivalent 

A continuation of ENG 215, with intensive practice in writing and criticizing non- 
technical articles. 

ENG 222 ADVANCED COMPOSITION (CREATIVE WRITING) 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ENG 1 1 2 

A course in creative writing especially designed for students who have demonstrated 
ability; emphasis on short prose fiction. 

ENG 223 VOCABULARY BUILDING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ENG 1 12 

A system of increasing the student's supply of useful words as found in the best modern 
English prose. 

ENG 321 SCIENTIFIC WRITING 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

Intensive practice in writing technical and scientific reports, articles for journals, and 

business letters relating to technical reports. 

ENG 324 ADVANCED GRAMMAR 3 (3-0) s 

An intensive study of English grammar with attention to the historical development 
of the language and with special emphasis on contemporary usage. 

SPEECH 

ENG 231 BASIC SPEAKING SKILLS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 1 12 

Training in the fundamentals of public speaking; supplementary training in some 
aspects of group discussion (panel, forum, symposium, or committee) and in the 
techniques of good listening. 

ENG 332 ARGUMENTATION AND PERSUASION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ENG 231 or equivalent 

Analysis, brief-drawinq and evidence, and methods of proof and refutation; funda- 
mentals of conviction; naturalness and forcefulness, extempore speeches, debates, and 
discussions. 

ENG 333 PUBLIC ADDRESS AND EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING 3 (3-0 s 

Prerequisite: ENG 231 or equivolent 

Public speaking for special occasions, including speech of introduction, committee- 
room speech, after-dinner speech, speech at professional convention, political speech, 
formal sales talk. 

ENG 334 ORAL READING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ENG 112 and 231, or approvol of the deportment 

Training in the analysis and presentation of printed materials, technical and semi- 
technical, for platform, radio, and television. Emotional reactions to odd color and 
interest; expressive body and voice; correction of faulty habits. 

ENG 336 PARLIAMENTARY PRACTICE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ENG 112 

(Not to be counted toward the fulfillment of any requirement in languages, 
humanities, or social sciences without specific authorization.) 

Rules and customs of assemblies, including organization, motions; participation in ond 

conduct of meetings; parliamentary strategy. 

210 



ENTOMOLOGY 



ENG 337 GROUP DISCUSSION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ENG 112 and 231, or opproval of the department 

The theory and practice of leading and taking part in such groups os panels, forums, 
symposia, conferences and committees. Oral and written assignments. Frequent recordings. 

LITERATURE 

Note: ENG 111 and 112 arc prerequisites to all courses in literature 

ENG 205 READING FOR DISCOVERY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of selected poems, plays, ond short stories drawn from English, American, and 
European literature with emphasis on the great themes of literature and on the opproach 
of the creative artist to basic ideas in Western culture. 

ENG 361 BACKGROUNDS OF ENGLISH CIVILIZATION (I) 3 (3-0) f 

A reading course in English literature from the Anglo-Saxon invasions to the Romantic 
period, with an emphasis on the contributions of English life and thought to Western 
Civilizotion. 

ENG 362 BACKGROUNDS OF ENGLISH CIVILIZATION (II) 3 (3-0) s 

English literature from the Romantic period to the present day. This course may be 
token either as a continuation of ENG 361 or as an independent course. 

ENG 365 THE AMERICAN MIND (I) 3 (3-0) f 

The development of American thought and civilization as reflected in American literature 
from the colonial settlements through the New England revival of the nineteenth century. 

ENG 366 THE AMERICAN MIND (II) 3(3-0) s 

The background of contemporary American literature and thought, from Mark Twain 
to Hemingway ond Faulkner. This course may be token either as o continuation of ENG 
365 or as on independent course. 

ENG 375 SOUTHERN WRITERS 3(3-0) s 

An introduction to Southern culture as revealed in poetry and short fiction from Poe 
to the present day. Readings in the Southern essay dealing with social, political, and 
literary problems. 

ENG 382 SHORT PROSE FICTION 3 (3-0) f 

The study of selected short stories by the most representative of contemporary British 
and American writers. 

ENG 385 SHAKESPEARE 3 (3-0) $ 

A study of the principal plays with emphasis on reading Shakespeare for enjoyment. 

ENG 396 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD (I) 3 (3-0) f 

Readings from selected greet books from the Homeric period of Greek literoture to the 
Renaissance in Europe. Emphasis on the contributions of this literoture to modern thought. 

ENG 397 LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD (II) 3 (3-0) s 

Readings from selected great books from the Renaissance to the twentieth century with 
emphasis on literary appreciation and on the development of important concepts 
underlying contemporary life in the Western World. This course may be token either as a 
continuation of ENG 396 or as an independent course. 

ENG 398 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 3 (3-0) s 

A study of selected examples of American, British, and Continental writing from 1915 
to the present day with reference to changing literary forms and themes. 



ENTOMOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



ENT 301 INTRODUCTION TO FOREST INSECTS 3(2-2) f 

Prerequisite: School of Forestry 

Mr. Brett 
An introductory course covering the fundamentals of classification, development, habits 
ond control of forest insects 

ENT 312 ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 101 

A basic course, covering the fundamentals of insect classification, development, food 
habits and controls. 

Mr. Brett 

211 



ENTOMOLOGY 



ENT 322 BEEKEEPING 3 (1-4) s 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

A basic course dealing with the place of the honeybee in O'jr agricultural economy; the 

colony and its components; management; manipulation; honey production, care and 

marketing. 

Mr. Stephen 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 501, 502 INSECT MORPHOLOGY 3(1-4) f s 

Prerequisite: ENT 312 

Covers general morphology, external and Internal, of the insects and their relatives. 

ENT 501 will deal primarily with external morphology and ENT 502 with internal 

morphology. 

(Given In odd years) 

Mr. Townes 

ENT 511 SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY 3(1-4) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 312 

A somewhat detailed survey of the orders and families of insects, designed to acquaint 
the student with these groups and develop in the student some ability in the use of keys, 
descriptions, etc. 

(Given in even yeors) 

Mr. Mitchell 

ENT 522 ENTOMOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE 3(1-4) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 312 

A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the various methods and 
techniques commonly employed in entomology. Including a brief introduction to drawing 
ond the photographic process. 
(Given in even years) 

Mr. Mitchell 

ENT 531 INSECT ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite- ENT 301 or 312 

The influence of environmental factors on insect development, distribution and behavior. 
(Given In even years) 

Mr. Brett 

4 (2-4) f 
ENT 541, 642 IMMATURE INSECTS 2(1-2) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 51 1 or permission of instructor 

541 is a study of the characteristics of the immature forms of the orders and principal 
families of insects. 542 is a detailed study of the Immature forms of some special group 
of insects of the students' own choosing. 
(Given in even years) 

Mr. Dogger 

ENT 551, 552 APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: ENT 312 

An advanced course In which the principles of applied entomology are studied in respect 
to the major economic insect pests. Methods of determining and examining insect 
damage, the economic importance of insects and the chief economic pests of man, food, 
and fiber are studied as well as laws and regulations pertaining to insects and Insecti- 
cides. 

(Given in odd /ears) 

Mr. Kulash 

ENT 561 LITERATURE AND HISTORY OF ENTOMOLOGY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ENT 312 

A general course intended to acquaint the student with literature problems of the 
scientist, mechanics of the library and book classification, bibliographies of the zoological 
sciences, abstract journals, forms of bibliographies, forms of literature, preparation of 
scientific paper; taxonomic Indexes and literature (with a historical background) and 
history of the development of zoological science from ancient to modern times with 
emphasis on entomology. 

(Given in odd years) 

Mr. Brett 

ENT 571 FOREST ENTOMOLOGY 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: ENT 301 or 3)2 

A study of methods of identification of forest pests, the factors governing their abun- 
dance, their habits, ond the control of forest pests. 

Mr. Kulash 



212 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 

ENT 582 MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY 3 (5 31 c 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Jor^Sc and':.."°a^'r^ol!.'' "°'°'' °"' ""*^°' °' ''" ^°^°"*'= °''''°^°^' °' -°"' 
(Given in odJ yeors) 

Mr, Harkema 
COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENT 601, 602 PRINCIPLES OF TAXONOMY In'}} ! 

Prerequisite: ENT 501 ■»n-'») s 

nmmo"t''i^^'"L°t^"^'"^ J^^ methods and tools used in onimol taxonomy, designed to 
?naxonom!fVeYearcK"^'°"""" °' *°'^°"°'"'^ "^^^°^"-' °'^^ ^--^^^ ° ^°-d°»- 
(Given in even years) 

Mr. Townes 

ENT 611 INSECT PHYSIOLOGY 4(3 21 f 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor y • i r 

The course deals with the aspects of animal physiology related to insects. The functions 
of the various insect organs are discussed and how these systems are disrupted by eco- 
norri.c poisons. Laboratory work includes the use of standard physiologicol opporotus 
with emphasis on methods rather than obtaining results k r y v^y^^ uius 

(Given in odd yeors) 

Mr. Gast 

ENT 621 INSECT TOXICOLOGY 4(3 2) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

i^nL^onH^K^^^^'Sr'^l? ^"^^T:'"' °"d Physicol characteristics of insecticides ond formula- 
tions and their effects on biological systems. Modes of action and mommalion toxicities 
ond j!^lunV;n^'^h '-°^^°;°^ work involves insect culture work, formulating insecticides 
and evoluoting the effectiveness of various materials. 
(Given in even yeors) 

Mr. Gast 

ENT 632 ADVANCED SYSTEMATIC ENTOMOLOGY 3 fO 61 < 

Prerequisite: ENT 501 •» ^" oj s 

A detailed study of some special insect group of the student's own choosing. 

Mr. Mitchell 

Prerequisites: Gridiafe'^ftondrng and consent of the instructor ^'^'^"' "^ orrongement 

HoIv!!^^!^ ^"«°^^^. °" sPec'o' problems in entomology not reloted to a thesis problem but 
designed to provide experience ond training in research. 

Staff 
1 1 

Staff 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Entomology or closely allied fields '' °"''"''""*'" 

Originol research in connection with thesis problem in entomology. 

Staff 



ENT 680 SEMINAR 

Prerequisite: Groduote standing in Entomology or closely allied fields 
Discussion of entomological topics selected ond assigned by Seminar Choi 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 



ST 302 STATISTICAL LABORATORY , ,, ,. 

dot'n ""fnr °1 ""^«^"''°"°l 'BM punch card mochines with special emphosis on go hiring 
dato for punch cords, coding, designing cord fields and the operotion of the punch 
verifier, sorter, collotor, tobulotor ond the 602A calculating pSnch Cornp lete w mno 

Prt7aT^\°n\Tl ""°*°^ '°''"'°'°' ^^'^ f°2A calculating ^punch will be ^empha^zed^ 
Progromminq of lorge scole computations found in stotistics on the conventional IBM 

p?^?a";n^";alSor^l?PC° t^.ri^ ^glvjn'.^ '"^''^^ ""'^ '^ programming on \1 T. 

Mr. Verlinden 



213 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 



ST 311 INTRODUCTtON TO STATISTICS 3(2-2) f s 

This course will relate general statistical concept to everyday life and will emphasize 
giving perspective to these concepts in place of developing skill. Quantitative descriptions 
of populations, sampling ideas, techniques of making inference about populations frorr 
somples and the uncertainties involved in such inferences. Formulation and testing o 
hypotheses, elementary and basic statistical techniques. 

Mrs. Carroll, Mr. Monroe 

ST 361 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS 2(2-0) 

or 3 (2-2) f s 
Prerequisite: College Algebra 

Optional one credit laboratory with illustrative problems and instruction in use 
of desk calculators. 
Survey of statistical techniques useful to engineers and physical scientists. Includes 
elementary probability, frequency distributions, estimation of means and standard devia- 
tions, sampling variation, control charts, elementary least squares curve fitting, etc. 

Mr. Hader 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ST 501, 502 BASIC STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisites: College Algebra and ST 31 1 or 361 or graduate standing 

Description of classification and scaled data. Sampling from normal, uniform, binomial 
and multimodal populations: empirical distributions of various measures of location, 
dispersion, correlation, regression, significance tests, confidence intervals. Collection and 
anolysis of data: surveys, regression, experimental designs, factoral data variance com- 
ponents, non-parametric methods and sequential analysis. Intended primarily as o 
parallel course to Statistics 521, 522 to be taken by Statistics majors or Ph.D. minors, 
but not intended as a service course for other departments. 

Staff 

ST 511 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, I 4(3-2) f 

Prerequisite: ST 31 I or graduate standing 

Basic concept of statistical models and use of samples; variation and statistical measures; 
distributions; tests of significance; analysis of variance and elementary experimental 
design; regression and correlation; Chi-square. 

Mr. Robinson 

ST 512 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, II 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 51 1 

Complex analysis of variance and design of experiments repeated over place and time, 
individual degrees of freedom, factorial and incomplete block designs; covariance; multi- 
ple regression and correlation. 

Mr. Mason 

ST 513 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES, I 4(3-2) f 

Prerequisite; ST 3 1 1 or graduate standing 

Basic concepts in collection and analysis of data. Variability of sample data, distributions, 
confidence limits, Chi-square, "t" test, analysis of variance, regression, correlation, 
analytic and descriptive surveys, basic experimental designs index numbers. 

Staff 

ST 514 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES, II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 513 

Extension of basic concepts of experimental statistics to social surveys and experiments; 
sampling from finite populations, sampling systems, unrestricted, stratified and multistage 
designs, random and systematic selection with varying probabilities, methods of estimation 
analysis of variance with multiple classification, covariance, multiple regression, poly- 



nomials. 



Mr. Finkner 



ST 515, 516 EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERS 3(3-0) f 

or 4(3-2) f 
3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite: ST 361 or graduate standing 

One credit optional laboratory available first term only 
General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in engineering, 
textiles, wood technology, etc. Includes probability, distributions, measurement of pre- 
cision, simple lineor regression, tests of significance, analysis of variance enumeration 
data, sensitivity dato, life testing experiments and experimental design. 

Mr. Hader 



214 



EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 



ST 521, 522 BASIC STATISTICAL THEORY 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisites; ST 31 1 or graduate standing end undergraduate Calculus 

This course will present the theory needed In all advanced courses in statistical 
analysis and some of the fundamentals for advanced theory courses 
Probability, frequency distributions and moments; sampling distributions; introductory 
theory of point and interval estimation and parametric and non-parometric tests of 
hypotheses; theory of least squares, multiple regression, analysis of variance and co- 
variance and variance components. 

Stoff 

ST 591 SPECIAL PROBLEMS 1-3 credits by arrangement f s 

Development of techniques for specialized cases, particularly in connection with thesis 
and practical consulting problems. 

Staff 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ST 611, 612 INTERMEDIATE STATISTICAL THEORY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ST 522, Advanced Calculus and Matrix Theory 

This course will provide the additional theory above that of ST 521, 522 needed for 
advanced theory courses. Many of the topics in ST 521, 522 will be developed more 
rigorously and more attention will be paid to mathematical ospects. Central limit 
theorem and law of large numbers, bivariate normal distributions, convergence theorems. 
Method of maximum likelihood, efficient estimates, simultaneous confidence regions, 
general theory of tests of hypotheses, general linear hypothesis, sequential tests of 
hypotheses, distribution-free methods, Chi-squore tests for frequency data. 

Mr. Horvitz 

ST 621 STATISTICS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 502 or 512 

Sources and magnitudes of errors in experiments with animals, experimental designs and 
methods of analysis adapted to specific types of animal research, relative efficiency of 
alternate designs, amount of data required for specified accuracy, student reports on 
selected topics. 

(Offered in odd-numbered years) 

Mr. Lucas 

ST 623 STATISTICS IN PLANT SCIENCE 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 502 or 512 

Principles and techniques of planning, establishing, and executing field and greenhouse 
experiments. Size, shape and orientation of plots, border effects, selection of experimental 
material, estimation of size of experiments for specified accuracy, scoring and subjective 
tests, subsompling plots and yields for laboratory analysis. 
(Offered in odd-numbered years) 

Mr. Mason 

ST 626 STATISTICAL CONCEPTS IN GENETICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: Genetics 512, and ST 502 or 512 unless taken concurrently 
Factors bearing on rotes of change in population means and vorionces, with special 
reference to cultivated plants and domestic animals; selection, inbreeding, magnitude 
and nature of genotypic and non-genotypic variability. Experimentol and statistical 
approaches in the analysis of quantitative inheritonce. 

Mr. Comstock 

ST 631 THEORY OF SAMPLING APPLIED TO SURVEY DESIGN 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite; ST 502 or 512 or 514 or 516 

Basic theory of sompling from a finite population, confidence limits and estimotion of 
optimum sample size, comparison of different sample designs, methods and probabilities 
for selection and methods of estimation, choice of a sampling unit, double sampling, 
matched samples. 

Mr. Finkner 

ST 641 (RS 641) STATISTICS IN SOCIOLOGY 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 513 

The opplication of statistical methods in sociological research. Emphosis on selecting 
appropriate models, instruments, and techniques for the more frequently encountered 
problems and forms of da'.a. 

Mr. Homilton 

ST 651 (AGC 651) ECONOMETRIC METHODS I 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 514, ST 521, AGC 641 and AGC 642 

Decision making under uncertainty. Stochostic elements in economic theories. Problems 
of model construction. Special techniques for analyzing simultaneous economic relotions. 

Graduate Staff 

215 



FIELD CROPS 



ST 652 (AGC 652) ECONOMETRIC METHODS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ST 513, ST 522, AGC 641 or AGC 642 

Basic concepts of estimation and tests of significance os opplied to economic data. 
Empirical sampling methods. Non-parametric methods; sequential testing. Extension of 
least squares methods to research in economics; production surfaces. Special topics in 
variance components and mixed models. Use of experimental designs in economic re- 
search. Elements of multivariote analysis. Techniques for analysis of time series. 

Mr. Anderson 

ST 661, 662 APPLIED MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or 5)4 (Also analytical geometry and elementary properties of 

determinants) 
The general multivariate model for experimental work, relations between multiple 
regression, analysis of variance and multivariate analysis, factor analysis, the generalized 
variance, the generalized Student ratio, intra-class correlations, testing compound sym- 
metry between two sample covariance matrices, scale analysis, canonical correlation, 
testing for the rank of a correlation matrix. 

Mr. Nicholson 

ST 663 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ST 661 or permission of instructor 

A seminar course devoted to special problems in applied multivariate analysis particularly 
designed for advoncing the use of these methods in specific research problems. 

Staff 

ST 664 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF FACTOR ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 661 or permission of instructor 

History of factor analysis, theory of two-factors, fictitious factors, hierarchal order, need 
of group factors, the centroid method, communalities, common factor space estimation 
of factors, orthogonal and oblique factors, the problems of rotation, simple structure, 
second order factors. 

Graduate Staff 

ST 671 ADVANCED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or 512, ST 522 

General computational methods for linear regression; non-orthogonal data; carryovei 
effects; orthogonal polynomials; response surfaces; non-linear systems; variance com- 
ponents for orthogonal and non-orthogonal data. 

Mr. Anderson 

ST 672 SPECIAL ADVANCED TOPICS IN STATISTICAL ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ST 671 

Regrgession analysis with errors in both variables; transformation; enumeration data; 
discriminant functions; heterogeneous errors; non-parametric analysis. 

Mr. Monroe 

ST 674 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF 3 (3-0) s 

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or 512 and ST 522 

Inter-block analysis of incomplete blocks designs; partially balonced designs; confounding; 
data collected ot several places and times; multiple factor designs; chonge-over trials; 
analysis of groups of means. 

Miss Cox 

ST 681 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

A maximum of three credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, but any number 
toward the Doctorate. 

Staff 

ST 691 RESEARCH Credits by arrangement f s 

A maximum of nine credits is allowed toward the Master's degree; no limitation on 
credits in Doctorate programs. 



FIELD CROPS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

FC 211 FIELD CROPS I 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 102 

Discussion of fundamental principles underlying crop production. The application of 
these principles to the major and minor field crops. The elements of plant identifica- 
tion, crop grading and judging. 

Staff 

216 



FIELD CROPS 

FC 311 FIELD CROPS II 3(2-2) f 

Prerequisites: FC 211 and SOI 200 

Specific problems in field crop production other than forage crops. Discussion of those 
crops in farm rotations and brings together all the major aspects of crop production for 
different climatic areas. 

Staff 

FC 312 PASTURES AND FORAGE CROPS 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisites: FC 21 1 and SOI 200 

A study of the production and preservation of the principal forage crops. Special 
attention is given to the development and maintenance of pastures. 

Mr. Chamblee 

FC 412 ADVANCED PASTURES AND FORAGE CROPS 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: FC 312 * v* v, s 

Pasture species and management (cultural treatment) from an international viewpoint, 
and the mter-relationship of grazing animals on pasture development and management 
will be emphasized. Natural grassland areas and the place of special plant species will 
bo considered. 

Staff 

FC 413 PLANT BREEDING 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: GN 41 1 

The application of genetic principles to the improvement of economic plants, including 
discussions of the methods employed in the development and the perpetuation of 
desirable clones, varieties, and hybrids. 

Mr. Jones 

FC 414 WEEDS AND THEIR CONTROL 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: FC 21 1; CH 203 or equivalent 

Principles involved in culturol and chemical weed control. Discussions on chemistry of 
herbicides and the effects of the chemicals on the plant. Identification of common weeds 
and their seeds is given. 

Mr. Klingman 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

FC 511 TOBACCO TECHNOLOGY 2(2-0) i 

Prerequisites: FC 31 1 and approval of instructor 

A study of special problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research 

problems and findings dealing with this important cash crop will be discussed. 

Staff 

FC 521 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Credits by orrangemenl 

Prerequisite: Students odmitted only with consent of Instructor 

Special problems in various phases in Field Crops. Problems may be selected or will be 

assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. 

Staff 

FC 541 PLANT BREEDING METHODS 3(3-0) I 

Prerequisites: GN 512; ST 511 recommended 

An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts 
of inheritance. 

Messrs. Mann and Haynes 

FC 542 PLANT BREEDING FIELD PROCEDURES 2(0-4) 

(in Summer Sessions) 
Prerequisite: FC 541 

A laborotory and field study of the application of the vorious plant breeding techniques 
and methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Messrs. Haynes and Mann 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY* 

FC 611 FORAGE CROP ECOLOGY 2(2-0) * 

Prerequisites: FC 412; BO 441 

A study of the effect of environmental factors on the growth of forage crops. 
Attention will be given to methods of research in forage ecology. 

Mr. Chamblee 



•Students ore to consult the instructor before registrotion. 

217 



FORESTRY 



FC 612 SPECIAL TOPICS IN WEED CONTROL 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisites or corequisites: BO 203, BO 532, and FC 414 

Detailed exomination of current concepts in selected fields of weed control. The 
chemistry, physiology, ecology, toxonomy, microbiology, equipment, ond techniques used 
in weed control research will be discussed. 

Staff 
FC 631 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite; Graduate standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to 
agronomists reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the Master's degree. 

Stoff 

FC 641 RESEARCH Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduote standing 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Moster's degree. 

Staff 



FORESTRY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 101, 102 INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY 2(1-3) f s 

The profession of Forestry, its scope and opportunities; conservotion of natural resources; 
forestry field practice. 

Mr. Preston 

FOR 201 WOOD STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES 3 (1-4) t 

Identification, structure, properties and uses of woods of economic importance in the 
United States; identification by means of the hand lens is especially emphasized. 

Mr. Slocum 

FOR 202 ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF WOOD 1 (0-3) f 

An introduction to structure, identification, physical and mechonical properties of wood. 
Principles of lumber grading and yield in cuttings. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR s204 SILVICULTURE 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Growth and development of forest stands, reproduction counts, type of mapping, thinning, 
and weeding; establishment and measurement of sample plots. 

Mr. Miller 

FOR s214 DENDROLOGY 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Identificotion anci study of trees in piedmont and mountoin sections of North Carolina. 

Mr. Slocum 

FOR s224 FOREST MAPPING 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Field problems in forest mapping, including boundary location and type mapping. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR s264 PROTECTION AND UTILIZATION 2 credits 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Prevention, presuppression and suppression of forest fires, fire behavior. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR s274 MENSURATION 2 credits 

Prerequisite: CE 217 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Collection of field data for <;tond and yield tables, stem onalysis, and timber surveys 

Mr. Slocum 

FOR 303 WOOD-MOISTURE RELATIONS 3 (2-2) s 

Shrinking and swelling chorocteristics of wood; air seasoning; dry kiln construction; kiln 
operation; schedules and conditioning; lumber storage and moisture control during 
manufacture; dimensional stabilization methods, processes, equipment, ond moterials. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 311 PRINCIPLES OF FARM FORESTRY 2(1-3) f 

The theory and practice of forestry with special reference to the handling of farm 
woodlands and the utilization of their products; the place of forestry in form manage- 
ment and the agricultural economy. 

Mr. Miller 

218 



FORESTRY 

FOR 321, 322 PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY 3(3-0) f t 

Brief survey of the physical and chemical characferisfics of wood and cellulose. Chemisfry 
and technology of the ma)or mechanical, chemical, and semi-chemical processes employed 
in the manufacture of pulp and paper. 

Mr. Libby 
FOR 361 SILVICS 3 (3-0) s 

Site, soil, and other environmental factors in relotion to the establishment, growth, and 
development of seedlings, trees, and timber stands; the influence of forest vegetation on 
site development, grouid water, and micro-climote. 

Mr. Maki 

FOR 372 MENSURATION 3 (2-2) « 

Prerequisite: FOR s274 

The measurement of timber, both standing and felled; log rules, form factors, stem 
analysis and growth; methods of making volume, growth and stond tables; increment 
and yield studies; development of stand and yield tables from field data. 

Mr. Slocum 

FOR 401 WOOD PRESERVATION 2(1-3) i 

Factors causing wood deterioration; preservative materials and treatments; wood by- 
products from mill and forest waste. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 402 FOUNDATIONS OF FOREST MANAGEMENT 2 (2-0) < 

Prerequisites: FOR s274 or FOR 31 1 

The integration of silviculture, forest measurements ond economics in the management 

of woodland areas. (Not open to students majoring in forest management.) 

Mr. Bryont 

FOR 403 PAPER TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 2(0-12) s 

(First 8 weeks) 

Development of various types of paper finishes with particular attention to stock 
preparation, sizing, filling, and coloring. The finished products are tested physically and 
chemically and evaluated from the standpoini of quality and in comparison with the 
commercial products they are intended to duplicate. 

Mr. Libby 

FOR 404 MANAGEMENT PLANS 3(1-6) s 

Senior Camp 
Application of manoqement, logging, silvicultural and utilization practices on assigned 
areas. Each student must make a forest survey of on individual area and submit a 
record. 

Staff 

FOR 405 FOREST INVENTORY 2(0-6) s 

Senior Camp 
Practical field work in timber estimating and compilation of field doto. 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 406 FOREST INDUSTRIES 2(0-6) < 

Senior Camp 
A field study of logging, milling, and manufacturing with reports based on inspection 
trips. 

Staff 

FOR 407 FIELD SILVICULTURE 2 (0-6) j 

Senior Camp 
Prerequisite: FOR 361 

Studies of forest communities; dendrology of the coastal section of North Carolina 
silviculture practices. 

FOR 411 PULP AND PAPER MILL EQUIPMENT 3(3-0) I 

Principles of operation, construction, and design of process equipment employed in the 
pulp and paper industry. 

Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 412 PULP AND PAPER MILL EQUIPMENT 2(1-3) j 

Continuation of FOR 4 1 1 

Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 413 PAPER TESTING LABORATORY 2(0-12) f (First 8 weeks) 

Physical, chemical, ond microscopical exomination of experimental and commercial 
papers ond evaluation of the results in terms of the utility of the product tested. 

Mr. Libby 

219 



FORESTRY 



FOR 421 LOG AND LUMBER GRADES AND SPECIFICATIONS 2(1-3) s 

Log and bolt grades and specifications m use; log grades based upon lumber grades; 
lumber grading principles and practices for hardwoods and softwoods. 

Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 422 FOREST PRODUCTS 3 (3-0) « 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, CH 203 or 426 

The source and method of obtaining derived and manufactured forest products other 
than lumber. 

Mr. Barefoot 

FOR 423 LOGGING AND MILLING 3 (2-3) f s 

Timber harvesting and transportation methods, equipment, and costs; safety and super- 
vision; manufacturing methods with regular and short-log types of sawmills. 

Mr. Barefool 

FOR 431 DIMENSION STOCK MANUFACTURING 3 (2-3) 1 

Manufacturing and production methods for manufacturing dimension stock, flooring 
pre-fabricated stock, turnings, and cut stock. Production rates, plant layout and mecha- 
nization peculiar to the industry. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 432 MERCHANDISING FOREST PRODUCTS 2(2-0) < 

Principles and practices in the distribution and marketing of the products obtained from 
wood; organization and operation of retail, concentration, and wholesale outlets. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 433 GLUING AND PLYWOOD 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: CH 103 or 203, FOR 3C3 

Veneer manufacturing methods and equipment; veneer products; cold-press and hot-press 
banding adhesives; processing and use requirements; cause and prevention of inadequate 
bands; molded, flat, and post-formed plywood construction. 

Mr. Bethel 

FOR 441 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WOOD 3 (2-3) I 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, 303 

Strength and related properties of commercial woods; standard A.S.T.M. strength tests; 
toughness; timber fastenings; structural requirements; working stresses. 

Mr. Hart 

FOR 442 FURNITURE CONSTRUCTION AND ASSEMBLY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: FOR 303, 433 

Stock preparation for gluing; selecting adhesives; types of metal fastenings; joint 

construction and methods of joining wood and other materials; assembly methods for 

furniture and other wood products; construction and strength properties of laminated 

members. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR 443 WOOD FINISHING 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, CH 203 or 426 

Preparation of wood surfaces for finish coatings; composition and application of 
paints, varnishes, repellents, lacquers, and other wood finishing materials; finishing 
furniture and Interior wood products. 

Mr. Carter 

FOR ^51 PA5>EP CO'ORING LABORATORY 2(0-12) s (First 8 weeks) 

Evaluation and identification of dyestuffs and the development of color formulas for 
dyeing pulp and paper. 

Mr. Libby 

FOR 452 FOREST GRAZING 2(2-0) f 

Management of range areas, all grazing regions with special consideration of the 
southeast. 

Mr. Bryani 

FOR 453 LUMBER STRUCTURES 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: FOR 441 

Structural grades of lumber; working stresses; frame construction; construction esti- 
mates and computations; masonry, insulation, roofing, and other structural materials; 
millwork; fastenings; prefabs. 

Mr. Wyman 

FOR 461 PAPER CONVERTING 1 (1-0) f 

A survey of the principal processes by which paper and paper board are fabricated intc 
the utilitarian products of everyday use. 

Mr. Libby 



220 



FORESTRY 

FOR 462 ARTIFICIAL FORESTATION 2(1-3) s 

Production, collection, exfroction, and storage of forest tree seeds; nursery practice; 
field methods of plonting. 

FOR 463 PLANT INSPECTIONS 1 (0-3) s 

One week inspection trips covering representative manufacturers of pulp and papei 
ond papermaking equipment. 

Mr. Libby 

FOR 471 PULP TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 4(0-12) « 

Preparation and evaluation of the several types of wood pulp. The influence of the 
various pulping and bleaching variables on pulp quality are studied experimentally 
and these data evaluated critically. 

Mr. Hitchings 

FOR 472 FOREST POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION 2(2-0) 4 

Civil timber law, Illustrated by court cases; state and federal forest policy; job-load 
analysis in national forest administration. 

Mr. Miller 

FOR 481 PULPING PROCESSES AND PRODUCTS 2 (2-0) i 

Prerequisites: FOR 201, CH 203 or 426 

Fiber manufacturing processes and equipment; wall, insulation, and container board 
products; manufacture of roofing felts; pulp products manufacturing; resin treated 
ond specialty products, lignin and wood sugar products. 

Mr. Libby 

FOR 482 PULP AND PAPER MILL MANAGEMENT 2(2-0) s 

A survey of the economics of the pulp and paper industry is followed by a study of 
the work of the several deportments of a paper mill organization and the functions 
of the executives who ad.minister them. 

Mr. Libby 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 501 FOREST VALUATION 3 (2-3) t 

The theory and techniques of valuation of forest lond, timber stands, and forest prac- 
tices as investments and for oppraisals of damage. Risks and hazards in forestry as 
they apply to forest investments, forest insurance, and forest taxation, 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR 511 SILVICULTURE 3 (3-0) i 

The principles and applicotion of intermediate and reproductive methods of cutting; 
controlled burning, silvicides, and other methods of hardwood control. The application 
of silviculturol methods in the forests of the United States. 

Mr. Miller 

FOR 512 FOREST ECONOMICS 3(3-0) i 

Economics and social value of forests; supply of, and demand for forest products; land 
use; forestry as a private and a put<lic enterprise; economics of the forest industries 

Mr. Bryant 

FOR S13 TROPICAL WOODS 2 (0-4) s 

Prerequisites; FOR 533 

Structure, identification, properties, characteristics and use of tropical woods, especially 
those used in plywood and furniture. 

Mr. Bethel 

FOR 531 FOREST MANAGEMENT 3(4-6) (First 8 weeks) 

Prerequisites: FOR 372, 51 1 

Management of timber lands for economic returns; the normal forest token as the 
ideal; the opplicotion of regulation methods to the forest. 

Mr. Maki 

FOR 533 ADVANCED WOOD STRUCTURE AND IDENTIFICATION 2(0-6) i 

Prerequisite: FOR 201 

Advonced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the United States and 
same tropicol woods; microscopic anatomical features and laborator ytechniques. 

Mr. Slocum 

FOR 542 FIBER ANALYSIS 2(0-6) i 

Fiber microscopy; the determination of fiber measurement, quality, voriotion and 
identity in pulp woods. 

Mr. Barefoot 

221 



FORESTRY 



FOR 553 FOREST PHOTOGRAMMETRY 2 (2-6) s (First 8 weeks) 

Interpretation of aerial photographs, determination of density of timber stands and 
area mapping. 

Mr. Slocum 

FOR 563 QUALITY CONTROL IN WOOD PRODUCT MANAGEMENT 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: ST 361, FOR 433 

A study of methods used to control quality of manufactured and wood products. 

Emphasis is placed on the use of control charts for variables and attributes and on 

acceptance sampling techniques including single, double, and sequential sampling 

methods. 

Mr. Bethel 

FOR 573 METHODS OF RESEARCH IN FORESTRY Credits Arranged 

Research procedures, problem outlines, presentation of results; consideration of selected 
studies by forest research organizations; sample plot technique. 

Staff 

FOR 591 FORESTRY PROBLEMS Credits Arranged 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lumber manufacturing, 
pulp technology, or forest monagement. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FOR 601 ADVANCED FOREST MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS Credits Arranged 

Directed studies in forest management 

Staff 

FOR 603 TECHNOLOGY OF WOOD ADHESIVES 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 425, 426; FOR 433 

The fundamentals of adhesives as applied to wood-to-wood and wood-to-metal band- 
ing. Technology of adhesives. Preparation and use of organic adhesives. Testing of 
adhesives and evaluation of quality of adhesives and bonded joints. 

Staff 

FOR 604 TIMBER PHYSICS 3 (2-2) f f 

Prerequisites: FOR 441, 533 

Density, specific gravity and moisture content variations effecting physical properties; 
physics of drying at high and low temperatures; thermal, sound, light, and electrical 
properties of wood. 

, ^ Staff 

FOR^6 a 6 .DESIGN AND CONTROL OF WOOD PROCESSES 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: FOR 563, 603, 604 

Studv of desicn and operational control of equipment for machinery, drying, gluing, 
finishing and preserving woods. 

Staff 

FOR 621 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS Credits Arronged 

Selected research in the field of wood technology. 

Staff 

FOR 641 ADVANCED UTILIZATION PROBLEMS Credits Arranged 

Problems of qtk advanced grade in some phase of forest utilization. 

Staff 

FOR 671 PROBLEMS IN RESEARCH Credits Arranged 

Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Staff 

FOR 681 GRADUATE SEMINAR 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Forestry or closely allied fields. 

Presentation and discussion of progress reports on research, special problems, and out- 
standing publications in forestry and related fields. 

Staff 



GENETICS 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 411 THE PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS 3(2-2) \ 

Prerequisites: BO 102, ZO 101 

An introductory course. The physical basis of inheritance; genes as units of heredity 
and development; qualitative and quantitative aspects of genetic variation. 

Messrs. Stephens ond Grosch 

222 3 



GENETICS 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 512 GENETICS 4 (3-2) < 

Prerequisite: GN 41 1 

Intended for students desiring more thorough ond detailed training in fundamental 
genetics with some attention to physiological aspects. (Students conduct individual 
laboratory problems.) 

Mr. Grosch 

GN 513 CYTOGENETICS I 4(3-2) I 

Prerequisite: GN 41 1 

Recommended: GN 512 
Voriotions In the chromosomal mechonisms of inheritance and their genetic conse- 
quences. The chromosomes as they affect breeding behavior in plonts ond animals. 
Lectures and loborotory. 

Mr. Gerstel 

"GN 540 PRINCIPLES OF EVOLUTION 3(3-0) i 

Prerequisite: GN 41 1 

Recommended: GN 513 
The theory of evolution and the various sources of evidence on which it is based. 

Mr. Gregory 

GN 541 PLANT BREEDING METHODS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: GN 521 

Recommended ST 511 
An odvanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and con- 
cepts of inheritance. 

Messrs. Mann, Haynes 

GN 542 PLANT BREEDING FIELD PROCEDURES 2(0-4] 

(in summer sessions) 

Prerequisite: GN 541 

A laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breeding techniques 

and methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Messrs. Haynes ond Monn 
The following courses, offered in other departments, are available for graduate credit 
in Genetics: 

GN 503 (See Al 503 Animal Breeding). 3 (3-0) f 

GN 520 (Sec PO 520 Poultry Breeding). 3 (3-(f) f 

"GN 532 iScc ZO 532 Biological Effects of Radiotions). 3(3-0) s 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

• GN 614 CYTOGENETICS II 5(3-4) i 
Prerequisite: GN 513 

Lecture: The facts and theories of chromosome structure, mechanics and behavior. The 
cytogenetic analysis of naturol populations. 

Laboratory: Prepared slides illustroting the lecture material. Student preparation and 
analysis of cytologicol materials. 

Mr. Smith 

••GN 620 GENETIC CONCEPTS OF SPECIATION 3(3-0) $ 

Prerequisites: GN 512 and cither GN 513 or 540 

Review of current ideas on the mechanisms of the origin of species ond the noture 
of species differentiation. 

Mr. Stephens 

• GN 621 GENETICS OF POPULATION 3 (3-0) s 
Prerequisite: GN 512 

Recommended: GN 540 
Review of the forces molding the genetic structure of notural ond artificial populations 
of plonts ond animals. 

Mr. Lewontin 

• GN 633 PHYSIOLOGICAL GENETICS 3 (3-0) i 
Prerequisite: GN 512 

Recent odvonces in physioloqicol qenetics. Attention will be directed to literature on 
the nature ond action of genes, and to the interaction of heredity ond environment 
in the expression of the characteristics of orgonlsms. 

Mr. Grosch 



223 



GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 



GN 641 COLLOQUIUM IN GENETICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites; Graduate standing, consent of instructor 

Informed group discussion of prepared topics ossigned by instructor. 

Staff 

GN 651 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f : 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

GN 661 RESEARCH Arronged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Original research related to the student's thesis problem. A maximum of six credits 

for the Master's degree; by arrangement for the Doctorate. 

The following courses, offered in other departments, ore available for graduate credit 
in Genetics: 

GN 602 (see Al 602 Advanced Animal Breeding). 3 (3-0) s 

GN 626 (see ST 626 Statistical Concepts in Genetics). 3 (3-0) s 

* Given 1956-57 and alternate years 
** Given 1957-58 and alternate years 



GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING— __ — _ — — — 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MIG 101 EARTH SCIENCE 3 (3-0) < 

Elective. Not to be taken after MIG 120 

Introductory course in General Geology; chonges in the earth, and underlying physical 

and life processes. 

Stoft 

MIG 120 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 3(2-3) f s 

Dynamic processes acting on and within the earth; materials and makeup of the earth's 
crust; emphasis on engineering and agricultural applications in the southeast. Lectures, 
laboratories, and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 207, 208 EX. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 (3-0) f s 

A. The processes and forces involved in the development of land forms. 

B. The physiographic provinces of the United States and their importance; physical 
geography of North Carolina. 

Staff 

MIG 222 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 3 (2-3) : 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

Major events in the history of North America; rise and development of main animal 
and plant groups. Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 323 PALEONTOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIG 222 

Study of fossil life forms, with major emphasis on classificotion and structure of the 
invertebrate animals and their application to problems of correlation of strata. 
Lectures, laboratories and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 325 GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES OF NORTH CAROLINA 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

Physical geography, general geology, common rocks and minerals, and mines and 
quarry products of the State. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 330 MINERALOGY 3 (1-6) f 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Crystallography, and physical and chemical mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 351 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY 3 (2-3) 1 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

Structures imposed on igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock masses by de- 
formation and movement in the earth's crust. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. 

Mr. Parker 



224 



GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

MIG 372 ELEMENTS OF MINING ENGINEERING 4(2-61 « 

Prerequisite: MIG 351 ^ i ■> 

Introduction to mining: methods of development ond exploitation, drilling and blast- 
ing, mining low, administrotion and safety. Lectures, laborotory work and field trips. 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 411, 412 ECONOMIC GEOLOGY 3(2-3) f « 

Prerequisites: MIG 120, 330 

Made of occurrence, association, origin, distribution, and uses of economically valuable 

minerals. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. 

Staff 

MIG 442 PETROLOGY 3(2 3) t 

Prerequisites: MIG 120, 330 

Materials of the earth's crust; composition, texture, classification, megascopic identifi- 
cation, and alterations of the principal igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks 
Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 452 SEDIMENTATION AND STRATIGRAPHY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: MIG 442 

Sedimentory processes, products, and structures. Principles of sub-division of sedimentary 
terranes into natural units and the determination of their ages and history Lectures 
laboratories, and field trips. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 461 ENGINEERING GEOLOGY 3 (3 0) < 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 

The application of geologic principles to engineering practice; analysis of geologic 

factors and processes affecting specific engineering projects. 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 462 GEOLOGICAL SURVEYING 3 M 6i , 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, 442 ^ ' 

Methods of field observation and use of geologic surveying instruments in surface and 
undergrourid work; representation of geologic feotures by maps, sections and diagrams 
Lectures, laboratories, and field work. 

Messrs. Parker, Miller 
MIG 481, 482 SENIOR SEMINAR , (,.q. 



3 (3-0) s 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MIG S10 MINERAL INDUSTRY 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Economics of mineral industry. Cycles of mineral production. Exhaustiability Reserves 
Valuation of rriineral property. National resources; essential, critical, and strategic 
minerals. World distribution ond production. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 522 PETROLEUM GEOLOGY 3 ra 0\ . 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, 442 ^ ' 

Properties, origin and modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural gas Geologic 
and economic features of the principal oil and gas fields, mainly in the United States 

Staff 

MIG 531 OPTICAL MINERALOGY 3 (1 4) f 

Prerequisites. MIG 330 and CY 202 

Opticol principles involved in the petrographic (polarizing) microscope and related 
instruments. Mrcroscopic determrnotion of minerals in thin section ond in fragments 
Lectures and laboratory work. 

Mr. Parker 

MIG 552 GEOPHYSICS 3(2 3), 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, PY 202 

Fundomentol principles underlying all geophysicol methods; procedure and instruments 
involved in qravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical ond other methods of studying 
geological structures ond conditions; study of applications ond interpretations of results 

Mr. Miller 

MIG 571,572 MINING AND MINERAL DRESSING 3 f2.3) f . 

Prerequisite: MIG 372 v* j/ . . 

Pririciples of the minerol industry; mining lows, prospecting, sampling, developments 
drilling, blasting, handling, ventilotion and sofety; administrotion surveying ossoy. 
ir>g; preporotion, dressing ond marketing. 

Mr. Miller 

225 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



MIG 581 GEOMORPHOLOGY 3 (2-3) < 

Prerequisite: MIG 442 

A systematic study of land forms and ttieir relations to processes and stages of de- 
velopment and adjustment to underlying structure. Lectures, map interpretations, and 
field trips. 



Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 



MIG 611,612 ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOLOGY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MIG 411, 412 

Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. 

Staff 

MIG 632 MICROSCOPIC DETERMINATION OF OPAQUE MINERALS 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: MIG 531 

Identification of metallic, opaque minerals in polished sections by physical properties, 
etch reactions and microchemical tests. Laboratories. 

Staff 

MIG 642 ADVANCED PETROGRAPHY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: MIG 442, 531 

Application of the petrographic microscope to the systematic study of the composition 
and origin of rocks; emphasis on igneous and metamorphic rocks. 

Parker 

MIG 681, 682 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports and special problems of interest to geologists and 
geological engineers discussed. 

Staff 

MIG 691 GEOLOGICAL RESEARCH 3 or 6 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Lectures, reading assignments, and reports; special work in Geology to meet the need; 

and interests of the students. 

Staff 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



COURSES IN HISTORY FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

HI 201 THE ANCIENT WORLD 2(2-0) < 

A history of ancient times from the rise of civilization in Egypt and Babylonia to the 
decline of Rome in the fifth century. Emphasis is placed upon the evolution of cultures 
and civilizations, and upon the development of art, science, literature, and philosophy. 

HI 202 THE MEDIEVAL WORLD 2(2-0) s 

The political, economic, social, and cultural developments from the decline of the Roman 
Empire in the West to the emergence of the modern period. 

HI 205 THE MODERN WESTERN WORLD 3 (3-0) f s 

A history of major movements in the Western World from the Renaissance to the present 

HI 225, 226 MODERN EUROPE 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the political, economic, intellectual, and social developments in Europe from 
the age of Columbus to the present. The course divides at 1815. The semesters may be 
taken separately. 

Hi 251 THE UNITED STATES TO 1865 3(3-0) i 

A study of major historical developments in the growth of the American nation through 
the Civil War. 

HI 252 THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865 3(3-0) f s 

A study of major historical developments in the growth of the American nation since the 
Civil War. 

HI 261 THE UNITED STATES IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

An analysis of major developments in American history, with American history considered 
as part of the historical development of modern western civilization. 

HI 301,302 AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY 3(3-0) f i 

A history of economic institutions and customs in the United States from the time of the 

transfer to the New World of European economic customs to the present. The course 
divides at 1 860. The semesters may be taken separately. 

226 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



HI 306 NORTH CAROLINA HISTORY 2(2-0) s 

The political, social, and economic developments of North Carolina from colonial 
beginnings to the present. 

HI 331 THE OLD SOUTH 3 (3-0) i 

The intellectual and cultural history of the Old South and of ante-bellum society frorr 
the end of the colonial period to the Civil War. 

HI 332 THE NEW SOUTH 3 (3-0) s 

A study of the political, economic, and sociol developments in the South from the Civil 
War to the present. 

HI 333 AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL HISTORY 3(3-0) I 

Historical developments of agricultural activity in the United States from the transfer 
of western European agriculture to America to the present, with particular emphasis on 
the historical place and importance of agriculture in American life. 

HI 367 MODERN WESTERN ECONOMIC HISTORY 3 (3-0) i 

A treatment of the historical development of the economic customs and institutions ot 
the western world during the modern period, beginning with the Commercial Revolution. 

HI 401 RUSSIAN HISTORY 3 (3-0) f 

This course presents the major trends in Russian social, political, economic, and culturol 
history, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. USSR policy is studied 
in relation to the full sweep of Russian history. 

HI 402 ASIA AND THE WEST 3 (3-0) i 

A history of Asia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on 
Asian nationalism and conflict with the imperial powers. 

HI 409 COLONIAL AMERICA 2(2-0) i 

A study of the development of the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries, with special emphasis on European backgrounds. 

HI 412 RECENT UNITED STATES HISTORY 3(3-0) f s 

A study of the main currents in American political, economic, social and diplomatic 
history of the twentieth century. 

HI 422 HISTORY OF SCIENCE 3 (3-0) i 

A study of the evolution of science from antiquity to the present with particular ottention 
given to the impact of scientific thought upon selected aspects of western civilization. 
The course provides a broad perspective of scientific progress and shows the interrelation- 
ship of science and major historical developments. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HI 534 (SAME AS RS 534). FARMERS' MOVEMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United States and Canada 
principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Populist revolt, 
the Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, the Equity societies, the Nonpartisan League, 
cooperative marketing, qovcrnmcnt programs, and present problems 

COURSES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PS 201 THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENTAL SYSTEM 3 (3-0 t s 

A study of the American federal system, integroting national and state government, 
with emphasis on constitutional principles, major governmental organs, governmental 
functions, and the politics and machinery of elections. Some ottention is given to othei 
types of political systems, ond comparisons ore mode where relevant throughout the 
course. 

PS 202 COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 3 (3-0) f s 

This course examines the principal types of county and city government and the function; 
performed by counties and cities including functional relationships with the state and 
notional governments. 

PS 301 COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) I 

An onolyticol study of the fodcrol ond unitory systems ond the presidentiol, poriiomen- 
tory, ond outhoritorian plans of government, with speciol ottention to the governments 
of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Itoly, and the Soviet Union. 



227 



HORTICULTURE 



PS 302 CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS 3 (3-0) f i 

A study of the pattern of intsrnational life, the instruments of notional policy, the 
controls upon international behavior, and the mojor problems in international relations 
since World War II, including the development of the United Nations and various 
regional arrangements. Attention is given to the national interests and foreign policies 
of the states belonging to the Western ond Soviet blocs, with emphasis on the position 
of the United States. 

PS 401 AMERICAN PARTIES AND PRESSURE GROUPS 3 (3-0) f i 

After a brief survey of those fealures of American government essential to an under- 
standing of the political process, the course proceeds to examine the American electorate 
and public opinion and devotes its major attention to the nature, organization, and 
programs of pressure groups and political parties ond to their efforts to direct opinion 
goin control of government, ond shape public policy. Special attention is given tc 
porty organization and pressure group activity at the governmental level and to recent 
proposals to improve the political party as on instrument of responsible government. 

PS 406 PROBLEMS IN NORTH CAROLINA GOVERNMENT 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or on acceptable substitute. 

Selected problems arising from the operation of the legislative, odministrotive, ond 
judicial machinery in North Carolina. In addition to acquiring o comprehensive view 
of these problems each student will make on intensive study of a special phase of one 
of them. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PS 501 MODERN POLITICAL THEORY 3 (3-0) i 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

A study of the state and its relotionship to individuals and groups, approached throguh 
the reading of selected possages from the works of outstonding philosophers from the 
sixteenth century to the present. 

PS 502 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 (3-0) I 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

A study of the principles and problems of administration in a democracy, including such 
matters as organization, personnel, fiscal management, relationship to the legislative 
and judicial functions, control of administrative agencies and policies, and public relotions 

PS 503 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

A study of the evolving mochinery and techniques of international organization in the 
present century with particular emphosis on recent developments. The actual operation 
of international orgonizotion will be illustrated by the study of selected current inter- 
national problems. 

PS 512 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL THEORY 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

Bosic constitutional doctrines, including fundamental low, judiciol review, individual rights 
and political privileges, and notional ond state power. Special attention is given to the 
application of these doctrines to the regulation of business, agriculture, and lobor ond to 
the rights safeguarded by the First, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. 



HORTICULTURE 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

HRT 201,202 WOODY PLANTS 3(1-4) f s 

Distribution, identification, adaptation, culture and use of ornamental trees, shrubs 



ond vines in landscape planting. 



Mr. Rondall 



HRT 212** HERBACEOUS PLANTS 2 (0-4) s 

Distribution, identif icotion, adaptation, culture ond use of ornamental herbaceous 
perennial and onnual plants in landscape planting. 

Mr. Randall 

HRT 222 INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE 3 (3-0) f s 

To give the student a general concept of the noture, importance, distribution ond 
utilizotion of horticultural crops ond o general understonding of the principles underlying 
the production of fruits, ornamentals ond vegetables. 

Mr. Gardner 



228 



HORTICULTURE 

HRT 301 PLANT PROPAGATION 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: BO 101 

A study of principles, methods and practices in seedoge, cuttage, division, budding, 
grofting and other methods of plant propagation. 

Mr, Randall 

HRT 311 NURSERY PRACTICE 3(2-2) f 

Prerequisite: BO 101 

The principles and practice involved in the production, monogement and marketing 
of nursery plonts. 

Mr. Gartner 

HRT 321- GRADING, PACKING AND INSPECTION OF FRUITS AND 

VEGETABLES 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: BO 101 

A detailed study of U.S. grades and standards for the principal fruit and vegetable 
crops. Practice m grading, packinq, and voriety identificotion. A course designed to 
prepare the student for work in the Federal-State inspection service. Field trips ore 
required. 

Staff 

HRT 331" FLORAL DESIGN AND SHOP MANAGEMENT 3(1-5) t 

Principles and practices of flower shop management including the art of floral design. 

Mr. Randoll 

HRT 342 LANDSCAPE GARDENING 3 (2-3) s 

The application of principles of design to landscaping the home grounds. The identifi- 
cation, propagation, use, and maintenonce of ornamental plants and lawn grasses in 
improving the home grounds. 

Mr. Gartner 

HRT 412 OUTDOOR PRODUCTION OF FLORAL CROPS 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisites: BO 102, SOI 200 (or concurrently) 

Principles, methods, and proctices in commercial production of floral crops out-of-doors. 

Mr. Randall 

HRT 421 FRUIT PRODUCTION 3 (2-3) I 

Prerequisites: BO 102, SOI 200 (or concurrently) 

Methods of production of the principal tree and small fruits. This is designed to give 
an understanding of the proctices involved in fruit production. 

Mr. Schneider 

HRT 432 VEGETABLE PRODUCTION 3(2-3) t s 

Prerequisites: BO 102, SOI 200 (or concurrently) 

Soil preparation, seedoge, plant production, fertilization, irrigation, pest control and 
general culture of vegetable crops. 

Mr. Cochran 

HRT 441 COMMERCIAL FLORICULTURE 3 (2-2) 4 

Prerequisites: BO 102, SOI 200 (or concurrently) 
Greenhouse construction, heating and monogement. 

Mr. Rondoll 

HRT 442 COMMERCIAL FLORICULTURE 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisite: HRT 441 

Botanical characters, impKjrtonce, propogotion, culture ond preporotion for market of 
the florol crops commonly grown in the greenhouse. 

Mr. Gartner 

HRT 452 PRINCIPLES OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROCESSING 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite; BO 102 

Principles and methods involved in the preservation of fruits and vegetables, with 
emphasis placed on conning ond freezing. 

Mr. Jones 

HRT 462 GRADING AND INSPECTION OF PROCESSED FRUITS AND 

VEGETABLES 2(1-2) s 

Prerequisite: Registration by permission ot the instructor 

Methods of inspection, grodinq and cnticol opproisol for quality of the principal fruit 
and vegetable products. 

Mr. Jones 



* Offered 1956-57 and in olternote years. 
•* Offered 1957-58 ond in olternote yeors. 



229 



HORTICULTURE 



HRT 481 BREEDING OF HORTICULTURAL PLANTS 3(2-2) f 

Prerequisite: GN 41 1 

The application of genetics and plant breeding to the improvement of horticultural 

crops. 

Mr. Barham 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HRT 501 HORTICULTURE PROBLEMS Credits by Arrangement 

PrereqLiisite: Permission of instructor 

Investigation of a problem in horticulture, each student selecting a problem and con- 
ducting the investigation under the direction of the instructor. The problem may last 
one or two semesters. Credits will be determined by the nature of the problem, not 
to exceed a total of 4 hours. 

Staff 

HRT 512* HANDLING AND STORAGE OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of the handling and storage of ornamental plants and plant parts. Considera- 
tion will be given to the chemical and pyhsiological changes occurring in storage, stor- 
age facilities, materials and methods for handling and storing these products. 

Mr. Gartner 

HRT 521,522 TECHNOLOGY OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PRODUCTS 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: 80 412 (or concurrently) 

Comprehensive treatment of principles and methods of preservation of fruits and 
vegetables, Including small scale plant operation and commercial processing plont visits. 

HRT 532** ADVANCED FRUIT PRODUCTION 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: HRT 421, BO 421 (or concurrently) 

A comprehensive study of principles involved in production of tree and small fruits. 

Mr. Schneider 

HRT 541 PLANT BREEDING METHODS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: GN 512; ST 511 Recommended 

An odvonced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts 
of inheritance. 

Messrs. Haynes & Mann 

HRT 542 PLANT BREEDING FIELD PROCEDURES 2(0-4) s 

Prerequisites: HRT 541 , or FC 541 or GN 541 . 

Laboratory and field study of the application of various plant breeding techniques and 
methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Messrs. Haynes & Mann 

HRT 562** HANDLING AND STORAGE OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

The chemical and physiological changes occurring during handling and storage of fruits 
and vegetables. Consideration will also be given to facilities for handling and storage. 

Mr. McCombs 

HRT 571* ADVANCED VEGETABLE CROPS 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisites: BO 421 (or concurrently) ond consent of instructor 

A study of the origin, distribution, botanical relationships, and basic principles of 
production of the major vegetable crops. 

Mr. Cochran 

HRT 581 SENIOR SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior in Horticulture 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems 
in horticulture and related fields. 

Mr. Gardner 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

HRT 601 ADVANCED OLERICULTURE 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite; Graduate standing in Horticulture or related field 

A study of a specific technical problem, involving original investigation, including 
a survey of pertinent literature, or an exhaustive study of literature on a given sub- 
ject or plant. 

Mr. Cochran 



* Offered 1956-57 and in alternate years. 
** Offered 1957-58 and in alternate years. 



230 



HORTICULTURE 



HRT 602 ADVANCED ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture or related field 

A study of specific problems in ornamentol crops, either through o review of pertinent 
literature or by an original investigation. 

Mr. Gartner 

HRT 612 ADVANCED FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROCESSING 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: HRT 522 or consent of instructor 

Critical study of certain processing methods as applied to fruit and vegetable preserva- 
tion. 

Mr. Jones 

HRT 621* METHODS AND EVALUATION OF HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture 

Methods and techniques in the field of horticulture and their application in the solu- 
tion of current problems. Critical evaluation of published papers reporting results of 
horticultural experiments. Methods of compiling data and presenting results. 

Mr. Morrow 

HRT 632 ADVANCED POMOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: HRT 532 or consent of instructor 

A critical study of specific problems In fruit crops including current literature. 

Mr. Schneider 

HRT 641 RESEARCH Credits by ArrongemenI 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture 

Original research on specific problems in fruit, vegetable, or ornamental crops, or in 

fruit and vegetable processing. Thesis prepared should be worthy of publication. 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master of Science degree; no limitation 

on credits in Doctorate program. 

Staff 

HRT 651 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Horticulture 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress leports in research, and special problems 
in Horticulture and related fields. Presentation of one or more papers each semester 
is required. 

Mr. Cochran 



INDUSTRIAL AND RURAL RECREATION 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

REC 152 INTRODUCTION TO RECREATION 3(2-2) f s 

This course is designed to provide instruction In the folowing areas: History and founda- 
tions of recreation including objectives, economic and social aspects, definition, ond 
importance; status of organized recreation in our modern society; certain applied 
principles of recreation; recreation leadership; activities and program planning; and 
tournoment planning and administration. The course is of lecture-laboratory technique. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 153 AQUATIC SPORTS 2(0-4) f s 

A laboratory course includes: the history of the techniques and methods of teoching 
swimming, modern methods of teaching, diving, officiating, games, pageants, the use 
of small croft, life-sovmg techniques, principles of water safety, the orgonizotion and 
administration of water sofety programs, and the maintenance of the swimming pool and 
woter front. 

Staff 

REC 201 PLAYGROUND LEADERSHIP 2(1-3) f s 

This course is designed to present to the student play activities of on octive, semi-active, 
and quiet nature so thot a selection can be made to fit a playground situation. Special 
emphasis is placed on the learning of low organized games, contests, relays, and water 
activities and their practical application in an actual playground program. Stress is 
ploced on the principles, techniques, and tools of effective playground leodership. 

Mr. Miller 



• Offered 1956-57 and In alternate years. 
** Offered 1957-58 ond m alternate years. 



231 



RECREATION 



REC 203 INDIVIDUAL CORRECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2(2-0) f 

The problems underlying the need for an individual physical educotion program for 
handicapped students are discussed. The primary emphasis will be on the organization 
and administration of the individual physical education program in schools and colleges; 
the formulation of individual programs of physical education for the most prevalent 
types of disabilities found in the school population and the techniques necessary for 
effective accomplishment of the objectives of the program. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 204 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN HEALTH EDUCATION 2(2-0) s 

A consideration of the most appropriate content and methods which should be in high 
school heolth education programs. Sources of materials are stressed. Public relations 
are studied. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 205 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2(2-0) f 

Presents critical studies of methods of instruction and procedures in supervision applicable 
to physical education. Provides observation in the required physical-activity-service 
courses. 

Mr. Hines 

REC 207 HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PARK ADMINISTRATION 2(2-0) f s 

This course includes the study of the history, present status, ond the basic principles 
of operation of parks and pork systems in America. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 251 SOCIAL RECREATION I 3 (0-6) f s 

This course presents material and information needed for conducting social ploy in 
the home, church, club, camp, on the playground, and in the recreation center. It 
emphasizes the place of the leader in recreation music and drama. Stress is placed 
on the acquiring of technical knowledge of social activities, including rhythmics and 
square dancing, and the conducting of specific types of activities. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 252 SOCIAL RECREATION II 3 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisite; REC 251 

A laboratory course is designed to develop leadership skills in recreation dramatics and 
music. Dramatic areas to be considered are: acting, children theatres, choral speaking, 
creative drama, play production, puppetry, story telling, and stage design and equip- 
ment. Activities in recreation music will include; singing, playing, rhythmic movement, 
song creation, and combined activities. Outside studies ond assigned readings with 
reports are required. 

Mr. Crawford and visiting instructors 

REC 253 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3(2-2) f s 

This course is designed to give the student a professional orientation in physical educa- 
tion and the place of physical education activities in allied and related fields. It 
introduces the student to the program of physical education — its interpretation in the 
light of present day needs, its sociological basis, aims and objectives, and a sampling of 
program activities. In the laboratory period stress is placed on the learning of skills 
and coochinq techniques involved in executing and directing the simplest to the most 
complex type of activities performed on mots and gymnosium apporatus. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 301 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f s 

This course is designed to prepare students to meet the problems of organization and 
administration of physical education with the view in mind of making suitable adaptation 
to various related fields. It presents the solution to many of the problems facing the 
administrator and teacher in organizing ond administering a physical education program 
with analogous comparisons of these problems to other areas in the field of recreation. 
The course is intended as a practical approach and a background for the student going 
into the physical activity field where problems of organization and administration assume 
major proportions in this area of work. 

Mr. Miller 

REC 315 PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisites; ZO 213 or its equivalent 

This course is designed for students in residence and for individuals in-service. Directors 
of community centers, boys clubs, coaches of athletic teams, athletic directors, and 
others are confronted constantly with; the prevention ond the care of athletic injuries. 
The course is of lecture-laboratory technique. 

Mr. Crawford 



232 



RECREATION 



REC 325 ACTIVITIES FOR THE HANDICAPPED INDIVIDUAL 2(2-0) f s 

This course provides students with methods that will motivate the typical individual to 
improve not onlv his physicol condition but also his outlook on life. To utilize modern 
educational principles and sport activities which will satisfy the handicapped individual's 
needs, interest, ond copacity. To provide sources of information applicable to the problem. 
Outside studies and assiqncrl readings with reports are required. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 331 SCHOOL CAMPING 2(1-2) f s 

This course covers the history of school camping and outdoor education. The purpose 
of this course is to provide the student with the methods and techniques in planning 
the school camp program so as to furnish a laboratory experience in those areas of 
study that can best be learned in the out-of-doors. Practical consideration will be given 
to the preplanning of school camping experiences. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 333 FIRST AID AND SAFETY 2(1-2) f s 

This course stresses first aid and safety education in relation to the home, school, and 
community. It stronqly emphasizes safety principles as applied to activities of the 
gymnasium, playgrounds, and athletic fields. Laboratory will provide practice in first 
aid skill. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 351 INDIVIDUAL SPORTS IN RECREATION 3 (0-6) f s 

Prerequisites: Completion of Physical Education requirements or equivalent 
The course provides for group instruction and laboratory experiences in the following 
sports: archery, bowling, golf, handball, tennis, table tennis, bait and fly casting, bad- 
minton and squash. Problems involved in starting and conducting a program of ind- 
divldual sports organized on a moss basis and designed to serve the interest of all 
people ore studied. Officiating techniques applicable to individual sports are utilized. 
The course is of laboratory character and study of the professional problems involved 
with assigned readings and reports is required. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 352 TEAM SPORTS IN RECREATION 3(0-6) f s 

Prerequisites: Completion of Physical Education requirement or equivalent 
The course provides for group instruction and laboratory experiences in the following 
gomes: football, basketball, baseball, volleyball, and speedball. Problems involved in 
starting and conducting a program of group games organized on a mass basis designed 
to serve the interests of all people are studied. Officiating techniques applicable to the 
various games are utilized. The course is of laboratory character, and study of the 
professional problems involved with assigned readings ond reports is required. 

Mr. Crawford 

REC 353 CAMP ORGANIZATION AND LEADERSHIP 3 (2-2) f s 

This course surveys the development of organized camping and the educational, health, 
and recreational objectives of campina. Program planning and leadership training in 
community, private, agency and school camping is emphasized. Laboratory will provide 
proctice in compcraft ikills. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 354 PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HYGIENE 3 (3-0) f s 

This course presents tho essential proscnt-day knowledge of personal and commmunity 
health. Emphasis is placed upon health problems, disease prevention, communicable 
diseases and their control, public health administration, school and industriol hygiene, 
ond various other health problems confronting the individual and the community. The 
course presents valuable and interesting health information to college men ond women 
in order that they might live more intelligently in terms of newer health concepts ond 
olso to be better prepared to assume their responsibilities as citizens of their respective 
communities. 

Mr. Miller 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

REC 401 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF INDUSTRIAL RECREATION 2(2-0) s 

A study of existing programs of industrial recreation, their operation, methods of finance, 
scope, and problems is emphosized. Relationship of industrial recreotion to other pro- 
grams of recreation is studied. 

Mr. Hines 

REC 404 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF RURAL RECREATION 2(2-0) s 

A study of the orqonizotion and administration of rural recreation programs and 
facilities. Emphosis on planning programs of recreational activities for the rural com- 
munity, the county-wide program, clubs, ond organizations. Study of existing programs 
of rurol recreotion, their operotion, ,ond their problems will receive mojor attention. 

Mr. Hines 

233 



RECREATION 



REC 411 PARK MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION I 2(1-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course deals with: methods of operation of various park facilities for public use; 
interpretative and publ'c use programs; information and education; park personnel 
administration; and protection and law enforcement. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 412 PARK MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION II 2(1-2) f s 

Pierequisite: REC 411 

This course will begin with a one-week tour of various types of parks and park 
systems. The following subjects would then be studied in detail: preventive maintenance, 
job planning and scheduling, modern maintenance techniques and maintenance materials. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 431 CAMPCRAFT 2(0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: REC 353 or equivalent 

This course Is entirely of a laboratory nature. It is designed to provide the student with 
skills, and methods of teachinn campcraft and woodcraft. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 451 FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT 3 (0-6) f s 

This course Includes the history of park recreation facility development and trends in 
recreation facility planning. Emphasis is placed upon the planning principles involved in 
the design and layout of recreation areas and recreation buildings. Field trips will 
enable the student to see the various types of recreation facilities. 

Mr. Stott 

REC 452 RECREATION ADMINISTRATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course deals with: the Internol organization of a recreation department; financing; 

accounting and financial procedure; budget making and control; records, reports, and 

filing; program planning and control; personnel policies and organization; and public 

relations. 

Mr. HInes 

REC 470 SUPERVISED PRACTICE 6(0-18) f s 

This course Is intended to provide the prospective recreation director with an opportunity 
to acquire experience In the skills and techniques Involved in the organization and 
administration of recreation activities In ar\ established program. Each student during 
his senior year will spend 10 weeks off-campus In a selected location. (A minimum of 
225 contact hours are required.) The student will have the opportunity to observe the 
activities and practices of the recreation executive, 1o organize and conduct activities 
under supervision, to observe activities and practices of experienced recreation activity 
leaders, and to observe the maintenance and operation of facilities. Prior to enrollment 
In this course, the student is expected to have completed the senior field trip consisting 
of visits to recognized programs of recreation throughout North Carolina. The student 
will have the opportunity to become familiar with the total recreation program. 

Mr. HInes 

REC 471 ORGANIZING THE RECREATION PROGRAM 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course Includes the types of recreation opportunities to be made available to 
individuals, groups, or communities to be served and the methods of providing these 
opportunities. Activities to be considered are classified as: arts and crafts; dance; drama; 
games, sports, and athletics; hobbies; music; outdoor recreation; reading, writing, and 
speaking; social recreation; special events and voluntary service. The lecture-discussion 
technique is used. Outside studies and assigned readings with reports are required. 

Mr. Mines 

REC 472 OBSERVATION AND FIELD EXPERIENCE 2(0-6) f s 

Prerequisite: Senior status 

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to observe, appraise, 
and evaluate: the operation of program octivities; teaching methods; administrative, 
supervisory, and organizational techniques; procedures and conduct of advisory and 
commission meetings; professional conferences and society meetings. Students will be 
expected to complete this entire gamut. By use of field experience, the student will be 
expected to prepare written reports of observations. Only those experiences approved 
by the recreation faculty shall be accepted. 

Mr. Mines 



234 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

REC 501 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN RECREATION 3(2-2) f 

Prerequisites: 1. Completion ot 20 hours credit in recreation courses or equivolent. 

2. A "B" average in recreation courses or equivalent. 
A survey of specific problems in recreation. Aims to develop criticol analysis Forms a 
bosis for the orqanization of reseorch projects, for the compilation and organization of 
material m a functional relationship, and for the foundation of policies. Follows the 
seminar procedure. 

Mr. Mines 

— — INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

lA 100 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL ARTS 1 (I.Q) f 

To assist students in their orientation to college life and to acquaint them with the 
scope and problems of industrial arts. 

Staff 
lA 103,104 INDUSTRIAL ARTS DRAWING 3(2-4) f s 

Proctice in letterinq, sketching and the use of instruments as opplied to orthographic 
proiection, pictorial drawings, sheet metal drawing, machine drawings charts and 
grophs, and architectural drawing. Explanation sketches and practical' working draw- 
ings. Materials and processes for drowing reproduction. 

lA 106 LABORATORY OF INDUSTRIES 3(2-4) 1 

This course is designed to orient the student to the purposes of industrial arts and 
to provide experiences in a variety of tools and materials used by industry such as 
woods, metals, electricity, graphic arts, ceramics, textiles, and selected crafts. 

Mr. Schmitt 

lA 107 GENERAL WOODWORK 3 (2-4) s 

This course involves propect planning, use and care of common hand tools, wood winish- 
ing, characteristics and uses of common woods, types and uses of hardware and fast- 
ners and wood lathe turning. Experiences in some elementary wood mochine with 
emphasis on wood lathe turning. 

Mr. Troxler 

lA 108 GENERAL WOODWORK 3(2 41 f 

Prerequisite: lA 107 v / > 

Use of woodworking machine tools. Production and selection of projects adapted to avail- 
able material and practical processes. New techniques in woodworking processes. Emphasis 
will be niven to new tools, materials ond processes in wood. 

Mr. Troxler 

lA 203 PRACTICAL DRAFTING 2(1-3) s 

Required of students in Wild Life and Furniture Manufacturing 

The application of drawing practices for the laymon. Freehand sketching and instrument 
drawings, letterinq, pictorial representation, production sketches, template drawing, ex- 
ploded views, shades and shodows. Individual problems ond selected graphic representa- 
tion. 

Mr. Troxler 

lA 205 INDUSTRIAL ARTS DESIGN 2(2-2) s 

Prerequisites: lA 103, 104 

Desiqn and construction in a variety of industrial moterials, stressing individual ex- 
pression and appreciation of well designed industrial materials. 

Mr. Troxler 
lA 206 GENERAL METALWORK 3 (2-4) f 

Basic operations and processes in bench metol, foundry, arc ond acetylene welding 
metal lathe ond art mctolwork, o study of metols including their properties ond uses.' 

Mr. Schmitt 
lA 207 GENERAL METALWORK 3 (2.4) , 

Basic operations and processes in sheet metol, forging, lathe work, milling machine 
shoper work, precision grinding, ond o study of the moss production techniques 

Mr. Schmitt 

lA 215 SHEET METAL 1 (1 21 « 

Prerequisite: ME 102 ' 

A course designed to qive students in the Heating and Air Conditioning curriculum of 
The Mechonicol Engineering Deportment practical experience in sheet metol process 
Tools, operotions, mochines, ond moteriols pertaining to duct work. 

Mr. Troxler 

235 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

lA 230 HOME MECHANICS 2(1-3) f s 

A course designed to provide information and experiences in tools, materials, and 
processes essential in the core, maintenance, and the repair of o home and home 
equipment. Emphasis will be placed on the development of "handy man" abilities. 

Staff 

lA 306 GRAPHIC ARTS 3 (2-4) f 

A course designed to give the student experience in the basic operations and processes 
and to provide related information in letterpress printing, block printing, silk screen 
printing, book binding, offset printing, and photography. 

Mr. Schmitt 

lA 307 GENERAL ELECTRICITY 3 (2-4) f 

The fundamentals of electricity as applied to magnetism, electromognetism, heat and 
power will be emphasized. Repair of common household appliances and the construction 
of well made electrical projects are required. 

Mr. Schmitt 

lA 308 INDUSTRIAL ARTS ELECTRONICS 3 (2-4) s 

This course includes the fundamentals of electricity as applied to electronics. Emphasis 
in the course is ploced on a study of the various applications of the vacuum tubes, 
especially radio communications along with a study of semi-conductors. 

Mr. Schmitt 

lA 314 RECREATION ARTS AND CRAFTS 2(1-3) s 

Required of juniors in Industrial and Rural Recreation; elective for others 
A course designed to give students interested in recreational work an understanding of 
and experiences in different types of arts and crafts. Emphasis will be given to a wide 
variety of crafts as adaptable to camps, city, industrial and institutional programs. 

Mr, Troxler 

lA 315 GENERAL CERAMICS 3(2-4) f s 

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to work with ceramic ma- 
terials as a medium of expression and to get experience in the basic manufacturing 
processes of the ceramic industry. Emphasis will be given to a study of the sources 
of clay, designing, forming, decorating, and firing of ceramic products. 

Mr. Hostetler 

lA 320 TOOLS AND MATERIALS 2(1-4) f 

A study of the care and maintenance of hand and machine tools and of the sources, 
manufacture, characteristics, uses, and costs of industrial materials and products. 

Mr. Schmitt 

lA 321 METALWORK TECHNOLOGY 2(1-3) f s 

Prerequisites: lA 206, 207 or equivalent 

This course is designed to give the student additional theory and skills in metalworking 
operations and processes. Emphasis will be on the metal lathe, metal shaper, and 
milling machine. 

Mr. Schmitt 

ED 100 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 2(2-0) f 

The place of vocational education in a program of public education and the fundamental 
principles upon which this work is based. 

ED 345 FIELD WORK IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisites: ED 300 and permission of instructor 

A study of pupil-teacher-community relationship at the secondary school level involving 
observations, visits, reports, readings and conferences. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 422 METHODS OF TEACHING INDUSTRIAL SUBJECTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

A study of effective methods and techniques of teaching industrial subjects. Emphasis 
is given to class orqanizotion; student-teacher planning; methods of teaching manipu- 
lative skills and related information: lesson planning; shop safety; and evaluation. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 440 VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 2 (2-0) f 

Prerequisites; ED 344, PSY 304 

A comprehensive study of the types of vocational education of less than college grade, 
provided for through Federal legislation; an evaluation of the effectiveness of the 
program; and a detailed study of the North Carolina Plan. 

Mr. Bryant 

236 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

ED 444 STUDENT TEACHING IN INDUSTRIAL SUBJECTS 6(2-15) f 

Prerequisites: ED 345, ED 422 

Students in the Industrial Arts and Industrial Education curricula will devote ten 
weeks during the foil semester to full time, off-campus student teaching in selected 
public schools throughout the State. They will be assigned to their teaching center in 
the preceding spring ond will report to their supervising teachers when the public 
schools (to which they ore ossigned) open in the fall. During the remainder of the 
term, additional courses will be token in concentrated form. 

Staff 

lA 460 GENERAL SHOP 3 (2-4) s 

Prerequisite: ED 444 or permission of instructor 

A course desitjned to give the student the opportunity to strengthen weaknesses both 
in skills and teaching methods which became opparent during his term of student teach- 
ing. Emphasis will be given to the orgonizotion, administration, content and methods 
of the general shop. Opportunity will also be given to develop good general shop proiect 
ideas. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 482 CURRICULUM PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS 2(1-2) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 304 or six credits In Education 

Approximately one-third of the course is directed to developing a working philosophy 
of industriol arts and the major portion of the course is devoted to planning and or- 
ganizing learning units in industrial arts. 

Mr. Schmitt 

ED 483 INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS AND DEVICES 2(1-2) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 304 or six credits in Education 

Analysis of learning units and the preparation of instructional aids and devices. 

Mr. Hostetler 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 516 COMMUNITY OCCUPATIONAL SURVEYS 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisites: Six credits in Education and consent of instructor 

Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys ond evaluation of findings in 
planning o program of vocotionol education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 521 ORGANIZATION OF RELATED STUDY MATERIALS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 422 or consent of instructor 

The principles of selecting and orqonizing both technical ond general related instruc- 
tional material for trade extension and diversified occupations dosses. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 525 TRADE ANALYSIS AND COURSE CONSTRUCTION 2(2-0) f 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

Principles and practices in onolyzing occupations for the purpose of determining teach- 
ing content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial course organization based 
on occupational anolysis covering instruction in skills and techology and including course 
outlines, job sequences, the development of industrial materials and instructional 
schedules. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 527 PHILOSOPHY OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

A presentation of the historical development of industrial education the philosophy 
of vocotionol education; study of Federal ond State legislation pertoini'ng to vocotionol 
educotion; types of programs, trends and problems. 

Groduote Staff 

ED 528 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN DIVERSIFIED OCCUPATIONS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ED 422 or consent of instructor 

A study of the development, the objectives, and principles of diversified occupations 

The orqanizotion, promotion and monagement of progroms in this area of vocotionol 

education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 552 INDUSTRIAL ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 (2-4) ♦ < 

See description on page 204 

237 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



lA 570 LABORATORY PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS A maximum of 

6 credits 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor 

Courses based on individual problems and designed to give odvanced majors in indus- 
trial arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their knowledge and abili- 
ties through investigation and reseorch in the various fields of industrial arts, such 
as metals, plastics, or ceramics. 

lA 575 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS A maximum of 

6 credits 

Prerequisite: One term of student teaching or equivalent 

The purpose of these courses is to broaden the subject matter experiences in the areas 
of industrial arts. Problems involving experimentation, investigation and reseorch in one 
or more industrial arts areas will be required. 

Graduate Staff 

lA 580 MODERN INDUSTRIES 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisites: Twelve credits in Industrial Arts and consent of the instructor 
Elective course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in industrial arts. 
Designed to assist teachers in guiding students to sources of information relative to 
various modern industries. 

Mr. Hostetler 

lA 584 SCHOOL SHOP PLANNING AND EQUIPMENT SELECTION 3(3-0) s 

A course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students 

The physical planning of school shops and laboratories; selection of tools and equip- 
ment. Whenever possible, actual or contemplated school buildings will be used for class 
work. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 592 INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION 2 or 3 (0-2 or 3) f s 

An elective course for graduate students in Industrial Arts Education and Industrial 

Education, with consent of instructor 
Individual and group studies of one or more major problems in industrial arts and 
industrial education. Problems will be approached through the application of research 
techniques with final reports prepared in a form suitable for publication as a magazine 
article, technical or professional bulletin. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 595 INDUSTRIAL ARTS WORKSHOP 3 (3-0) summer 

Prerequisite: One or more years of teaching experience 

A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial arts. 
The primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices for initiating, 
conducting and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge 
and practical experiences and will do intensive research work on individual and group 
problems. (Offered in Summer School Only) 

Mr. Hostetler 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 610 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF VOCATIONAL 

EDUCATION 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PSr 304, ED 344, 440, 520, or equivalent 

Administrative and supervisory problems of vocational education; practices and policies 
of Federal and State offices; organization and administration of city and consolidated 
systems. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 614 MODERN PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES IN SECONDARY 

EDUCATION 2(2-0) f s 

Foundations of modern programs of secondary education; purposes, curriculum, organi- 
zing, administration, and the place and importance of the high school in the community 
in relation to contemporary social force. 

Graduote Staff 

ED 619 SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION A maximum of 2 credits 

Reviews and reports on special topics of interest to students in industrial arts education. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 624 RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION A moximum of 6 credits 

Prerequisites: Eighteen credits in Education and permission of instructor 

The student will be guided in the selection of one or more research problems and in 
the organization of the problems, methods of gathering data, procedure for analyzing 
data, and best practice for interpreting and reporting data. 

Mr. Hostetler 

238 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

ED 627 RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION A maximum of 6 credits 

Prerequisites; Eighteen credits m Education and p>ermission of instructor 
The student will be guided In the selection of one or more research problems and in 
the organization of the problems, methods of gothering data, procedure for analyzing 
data, and best practice for interpreting and reporting data. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 630 PHILOSOPHY OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 2(2-0) f $ 

Required of oil groduate students in Industrial Arts Education 

Current and historical developments in industrial orts; philosophical concepts, functions, 
scope, criteria for the selection and evaluation of learning experiences, loboratory organ- 
izotion, student personnel programs, community relationships, teacher qualifications, 
and problems confronting the industrial arts profession. 

Mr. Hostetler 

ED 635 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 2(2-0) f s 

A study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision in the im- 
provement of industrial arts in the public schools. Selection of teachers and their im- 
provement in service and methods of evaluating Industrial arts progroms. 

Mr. Hostetler 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 



IE 206 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite; Sophomore sta.iding 

An introduction to the orgonizationol, production ond supervision problems of modern 
management. Includes basic principles and techniques for the solution of industrial 
problems in Internol Organization, Production Control, Cost Control, Wage Administra- 
tion, Materials Control and other managerial functions. 

IE 217 MACHINE TOOLS 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

One session two hours each week consisting of lecture, demonstrations and student 
projects. Dimensional control, press forming, power cutting of metals including turning, 
milling, shaping, ond finishing. Selection and use of cutting tools, speeds and feeds. 

IE 218 METAL FORMING 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite; Sophomore standing 

One session two hours each week consisting of lecture, demonstrations and student 
proiects. Survey of pattern making, foundry, die casting, non-ferrous casting, welding, 
flame cutting, heat treating. 

IE 224 WOOD WORKING EQUIPMENT 3(2-3) s 

Closswork covers the description of cutting, sondmq and assembly equipment and 
on explanation of the type of operation done by each kind of equipment. The theory 
of cutting and sanding and cutterhead and saw design are covered. Laboratory work 
consists of setting up, operating and maintaining typical furniture production equip- 
ment supplemented by visits to furniture plants. 

IE 241 ADVANCED WELDING LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisite; IE ) 16 or permission of instructor 

A study of mechanization as applied to oxygen cutting, to the various types of shielded 
metal arcs and to gas welding. Jigs, fixtures and positioners. Selection of welding 
process. Joint design ond welding costs. Welds and stress distribution. 

IE 269 WELDING AND PIPE SHOPWORK 1 (0-3) s 

Required of sophomores in Heoting and Air Conditioning 

Fundomentals of welding, both arc and gas, cutting equipment: safety in the use of 
equipment; application of low temperature and non-ferrous alloys; cutting, threading, 
reominq ond erection of iron pipe; copper tubes and fittings in heating and air con- 
ditioning work. 

IE 301 ENGINEERING ECONOMY 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

A study of the alternatives involved in engineering problems. Development of analyticol 
methods for evaluating the worth of engineering alternatives in relation to the cost 
of the service provided. Handling of depreciotion expense. Overhead, sunk, fixed ond 
increment costs involved in engineering alternatives. Problems of equipment replocment. 

IE 310 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY 2 (2-0) f s 

A course in the causes ond prevention of industrial accidents. 

IE 312 MOTION AND TIME STUDY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite; Junior standing 

A course designed for non-mdustriol engineering students. Principles ond techniques of 
motion ond time study. Typ>es ond uses of predetermined time systems; stopwatch time 
study, principles and methods of rating, application of allowances ond standard dota. 

239 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 



IE 322 FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 2(0-6) f 

An introduction to furniture drawing and construction. Furniture styles and periods are 
briefly covered by lectures and illustrations. Original detail drawings are made by the 
students from artists' sketches and general specifications. From these, students are 
required to make up complete bills of materials. 

IE 326 FURNITURE MANUFACTURE AND PROCESSING 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: IE 224 

A study of the production methods of the Furniture Industry. Class work includes the 
production procedures from the yard through the machine, cabinet, finishing, up- 
holstering, and shipping departments. The laboratory period is supplemented by visits 
to furniture plants. Particular attention is paid to production rates by departments, 
based on number of men and supervisors, the quality of product produced and equip- 
ment used. 

IE 327 FURNITURE MARKETING 2 (2-0) s 

Study of basic factors bearing on selection of ideal location, equipment and organization 
to serve a specific market with a specific furniture product, and selection of ideal 
market and product for a specific factory. In addition to lectures, each student will 
select one project for which he will work out a solution for correlating product and 
market. 

IE 328 MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisites: IE 217, 218 

The basic processes of conversion of raw materials Into producer and consumer goods. 
The cost reduction aspects of machine tools, jigs and fixtures in volume production. 
Study of industriol trends to meet needs of an expanding economy. Selected problems 
illustrating a wide variety of manufacturing situations. 

IE 332 MOTION AND TIME STUDY 4(3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior standing; corequisite: IE 206 or EC 425 

Principles and techniques of motion and time study; detailed study of charting operator 
movements; micromotion study. Predetermined time data and its applications; stop- 
watch time study with emphasis on rating, allowances and standard data theory and 
practice. 

IE 334 MOTION AND TIME STUDY 3 (0-3) f 

A course designed for non-industrial engineering students. Principles and techniques of 
motion and time study. Types and uses of predetermined time systems; stopwatch time 
study, principles and methods of rating, application of allowances and standard data. 

IE 341 FURNITURE PLANT LAYOUT AND DESIGN 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: IE 326 

Problems in industrial plant design with special reference to furniture manufacture; 

building structures, equipment location, space utilization, layout for operation and 

control; allied topics in power utilization, light, heat, ventilation, and safety. Laboratory 

period. 

IE 343 PLANT LAYOUT AND MATERIALS HANDLING 4(3-3) s 

Prerequisites: IE 328 IE 332 

Problems in plant arrangement and layout to obtain most effective utilization of men, 
materials, and machines as related to space and costs. Includes consideration of heat, 
light, ventilation, organization, control, material flow and handling, working conditions, 
safety and other factors as they affect the most satisfactory layout of the plant. 

IE 346 FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION II 2(2-0) f 

Prerequisite: IE 326 

Lecture and laboratory work on the design and construction of modern and period 
furniture. The course emphasizes construction features that are economicol of labor 
and materials and are adaptable to mass production. Students are required to complete 
an original design and detailed drawing of a piece of furniture as one requirement of 
the course. 

IE 408 PRODUCTION CONTROL 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

Planning scheduling and dispatching of production in manufacturing operations; con- 
version of sales requirements into production orders; construction of production budgets 
ond their relation to labor, materials and machines; laboratory project involving the 
development and operation of the production control system of a typical plant. 

IE 425 SALES AND DISTRIBUTION METHODS 2(2-0) s 

An analysis of the distribution of industrial and consumer products; the effect of 
increased productivity on sales and distribution channels; development and marketing 
of new products; merchandising and packaging. Sales training and sales engineering 
programs. 

240 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

IE 430 JOB EVALUATION AND WAGE ADMINISTRATION 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: Senior Stonding 

Job analysis, classification and specification. Grading, ronking, factor comparison and 
point systerns of job evaluation in determining equitable rotes for job content Wage 
surveys ond merit rating. Utilization of time standards in design, installation and 
operation of financial incentive plans. Comparison of various wage and salary plans 
Effect of wage payment methods on inaustrial relations practices. 

IE 443 QUALITY CONTROL 2 10 '>\ t 

Prerequisite: ST 361 ^ ' 

Economic balance between cost of quality and volue of quality, and techniques for 
accomplishing this balance. Organization for, specification ond utilization of quality 
controls. Statistical theory and analyses as applied to sampling, control charts, tolerance 
determination, occeptonce procedures ond control of production. 

IE 451,452 SEMINAR , (,.q) j ^ 

A weekly meeting of senior students to assist the transition from a college environment 
TO thot of industry. Lectures, problems, presentation of papers and outside speakers 
tmployment practices and procedures useful in job finding. 

IE 515 PROCESS ENGINEERING m n\ 

Prerequisite: IE 408 ' 

The technical process of translating product design into a monufacturing program 
ine application of industrial engineering in the layout, tooling, methods, standards 
costs and control functions of manufacturing. Laboratory problems covering producer 
Q-id consumer products. a k <=■ 

IE 517 PRINCIPLES OF AUTOMATIC PROCESSES 3(3-0) s 

Pi^requisitcs: IE 443, 408 •' vj w; 

Pr.nciples and methods for outomotic processing. The design of product, process and 
cot trols. Economic, physical, and sociological effects of automation. 

IE 519 DISTRIBUTION ENGINEERING 3 f3 0\ 

Prerequisite: IE 408 ' 

The application of the Industrial Engineering principles and techniques of time study 
metnods analysis, moterials handling, standards and controls to the field of distribution 
(.ollection, analysis, and interpretation of data and case studies in the retailing whole- 
saling, transportation, warehousing and service fields. 

IE 521 CONTROL SYSTEMS AND DATA PROCESSING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: IE 443, 408 ■» vj v; r 

This course is designed to train the student in the problems and techniques required for 
systemotic control of the production process and the business enterprise This includes 
training in the determination of control factors; the collection and recording of data- 
ond the processing, evaluation and use of data. The course will illustrate the application^ 
and use of data processing equipment and information machines in industrial processes 
The course will tram the student in the design of systems to focilitates the above 
requirements with most effective utilization of time, money, ond space. Case problems 
will be used extensively. 

IE 543 STANDARD DATA 2 (i a\ § 

Prerequisite: IE 430 •»*•»-»») r 

Theory and practice in developing standard data from stopwatch observotions ond 
predetermined time dota; methods of calculating standards from dato- opplication of 
standard data in cost control, production plonning ond scheduling, and woge incentives. 

IE 551 STANDARD COSTS FOR MANUFACTURING 3(3-01 « 

Prerequisites: EC 401; IE 430 

The development, applicotion and uses of standard costs as a management tool use 

of industrial engineering techniques in establishing standard costs for labor material 

ond overhead. Analysis of variances and setting of budgets. Meosures of monagement 

performance. 

IE 581,582 PROJECT WORK 2(0-6) f s 

Investigation and report on on assigned problem for students enrolled in the fifth-year 
curriculum in Industriol Engineering. 

IE 635 PLANNING FOR PRODUCTION 3 /, ox 

Prerequisite: IE 408 ^ ' 

A study of the factors to be considered in developing on effective and realistic plon 
of production for a monufocturing company; onolyses of soles demonds morket 
trends and business conditions. Construction of long ronge production schedules ond 
finished good inventory controls; pionnig for moteriol purchasing, equipment ocquisi- 
tion and labor requirements; economic ond cost foctors of inventory turrwver rotes. 

241 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



IE 651, 652 SPECIAL STUDIES IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 1 to 3 credits f s 

The purpose of this course is to oilow individual student or small groups of students to 
take on studies of special areas in Industrial Engineering which fit into their particular 
program and which may not be covered by existing industrial engineering graduate level 
courses. The work wouid be directed by a qualified staff member who had porticular 
interest in the area covered by the problem. Such problems may require individuol 
research and initiative in the application of industrial engineering training to new areas 
or fields. 

IE 671,672 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems for graduate students. Case analyses 
and reports. 

IE 691 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 2 to 6 f s 

Graduate research in Industrial Engineering for thesis credit. 

Note: IE 543, 551, 581, 582; IE 651, 652, 671, 672, 691 ore offered each year; other 
500 and 600 number courses are offered In alternate years. 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE _______ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

LA 212 LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION I 3(3-3) s 

The physical elements of landscape design; earth work, structures, preporation of grad- 
ing and master construction plans. Design of the Horizontal and vertical alignment of 
roads and earth work quantity estimates. 

Mr. Clarke 

LA 301,302 LANDSCAPE DESIGN I, II 

Prerequisite: DN 202 

Required of all third year students in Landscape Architecture 
Landscape origination, investigation, and analysis as applied to design problems. Space 
concepts in area design. 

Mr. Clarke 

LA 311,312 LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION AND MATERIALS I, II 4(2-6) f s 

Prerequisite: DN 202 

Required of all third year students in Landscape Architecture 
Londscope structures, materials, and land form, as a continuation and application of 
construction course In Civil Engineering (CE 101, 102). 

Mr. Clarke 

LA 401,402 LANDSCAPE DESIGN III, IV 6(0-12) f s 

Prerequisite: LA 302 

Required of all fourth year students In Landscape Architecture 
Area design continued and related to planting and construction courses. Larger scale 
landscape design and site planning. Introduction to regional problems. 

Mr. Clarke 

LA 421,422 PLANTING DESIGN 4(2-6) f s 

Prerequisites: HRT 202, LA 302, 312 

Required of all fourth year students in Landscape Architecture 
The appraisal of plants as objects of design and their orderly arrangement for land- 
scape effect. Techniques for recording designs, specificotlons, and cost estimates. 

Mr. Thurlow 

LA 501,502 LANDSCAPE DESIGN V, VI 8(0-12) f 9(0-12) s 

Prerequisite: LA 402 

Required of all fifth year students in Landscape Architecture 
Area design continued. The rural and urban landscape. 

Mr. Clarke 



MATHEMATICS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 101 FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS FOR ENGINEERS 5(4-2) f s 

Required of freshmen in the School of Engineering 

Rectangular coordinates, functions and graphs, linear equations and determinants, 
quadratic equations, inequalities, systems of equations involving quadratics, propor- 
tion and variation, binomial theorem, progressions, logarithms, exponential and loga- 
rithmic curves, trigonometric functions of general angle, derivation of trigonometric 
identities and formulas, the solution of plone triangles, with practical applications, 
slide rule. 

242 



MATHEMATICS 



MA 102 FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS FOR ENGINEERS 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite; MA 101 

Required of freshmen in the School of Engineering 
Radion meosurement of ongles, trigonometric curves, inverse trigonometric functions, 
trigonometric equations, complex numbers, theory of equotions, loci of equotions, the 
straight line, circle, parohola, ellipse hyperbola, the general equotion of second de- 
gree curve sketching, polar coordinates, parametric equotions, curve fitting, coor- 
dinates in space, planes, lines and surfaces. 

MA 111 ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY 4(3-2) f s 

Exponents and radicals, fractions, quadrofic equations in one and two unknowns, radi- 
cal equations, logarithms, progressions, binomial theorem, solution of higher degree 
equations by linear interpolation, geometric theorems and problems, the trigonometric 
functions, fundamental relationships, the right triangle by tables and slide rule simple 
identities and equations, the oblique triangle. 

MA 112 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS A 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 1 1 1 

A unified course, beqinninq with elementary ideas in analytic geometry and calculus, 

with the introduction of additional work in trigonometry where needed; rectangular 

and polar coordinate systems, the fundamental locus problem, lines and conic sections, 

curve tracing, the derivative, with applications to geometry and simple practical 

problems. 

MA 122 MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE AND ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 1 1 ] 

Simple and compound interest, onnuities end their applications to amortization end 
sinking fund problems, installment buying, calculotion of premiums of life annuities 
end life insurance, elementory statistics. 

MA 211, 212 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS B, C. 3(2-2) f s 

A continuation of MA 1 1 2 

Prerequisite: MAI 12 

An integrated course in the fundamentals of calculus, including formal differentiation 

and integration. Basic opplications to geometry, rates, maximo and minima, areas, 

volumes, first and second moments, and centroids are included. Additional topics from 

onalytic geometry, not covered in MA 112, are introduced as needed os a basis for 

calculus. 

MA 201 CALCULUS I 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite. MA 102 

Required of sophomores in the School of Engineering 

A course in the fundamentals of the Calculus including the formulas for differentiation 

and for differentiols: the integrals of polynomial functions; applications to geometry, 

maxima ana minimo, oreas, volumes, moments of area, work, fluid pressure; related 

rates, rectilinear and curvilinear motion; Newton's .Method of approximotion of roots. 

MA 202 CALCULUS II 4 (3-2) f s 

A continuation of MA 201 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

Methods of integration; definite integral with applicotions to length of arc, surface 

areo, volumes, centroids and moments of inertio; Simpson's rule; indeterminate forms, 

inifinite series, expansion of functions; hyperbolic functions, partial differentiation; 

multiple integration 

MA 401 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 (3-0) ♦ s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

Required of juniors in Electrical Engineering. Elective for others 
A first course in ordinory differentiol equations, handling standard types, proceeding 
to linear equations of higher order; some operator methods; opplications to geometricol, 
growth, and solution problems, ond to dynomicol ond electrical systems, higher degree 
equations of order one: special equations of order two; further special applications. 

MA 402 THEORY OF EQUATIONS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

Algebraic equations: isolation of roots, numerical opproximations to roofs, the Graeffe 
method; application of approximation procedures to tronscendentol equations; sys- 
tems of linear equations, determinants end introduction to matrix theory. 

MA 403 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ALGEBRA 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

An introduction to modern algebra: numbers, fields, rings, groups, vectors and vector 
spaces, linear transformations, matrices, olgebra and classes, ideals and algebraic numbers. 



243 



MATHEMATICS 



MA 404 FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF GEOMETRY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

Laws of logic; postulates and theorems; geometries based on different postulates projec- 
tive geometry; offine geometry; geometric transformations; Euclidean geometry; non- 
Euclidean geometry. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 501 NUMERICAL METHODS I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

Construction of scales to represent functions including the construction of some special 
purpose slide rules and networks; alignment charts, theory of least squares and curve 
fitting, including periodic functions; Newton's interpolation formula; the error curve 
and some of its properties. 

Staff 

MA S02 NUMERICAL METHODS II 3 (3-0). s 

Prerequisite: MA 401, 501 

Interpolotion formulas of Lagrange, Bessel, and Sterling; divided differences, subtobu- 
lotion; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical methods of solving ordinary 
and partial differential equations. 

Staff 

MA 511 ADVANCED CALCULUS 1 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 401 

Continuity; Taylor's series with remainder; infinitesimals; differentials; review of con- 
vergence test for infinite series, hyperbolic functions; partial differentiation; directional 
derivatives; implicit functions; Jacobians; elements of differential geometry, differen- 
tiation of integrals; improper integrals. Application to problems In engineering. 

Staff 

MA 512 ADVANCED CALCULUS II 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 51 1 

Gamma and Beta functions; line, surface, and space integrals; Green's theorem; Stoke's 
theorem; expansion of functions in Fourier series, applications to boundary value 
problems; introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable, including 
simple mopping problems, contour integration and residue theory; elliptic integrals. 

Staff 

MA 514 BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 511, 512 (One year of advanced calculus) 

Ordinary homogeneous and non-homogeneous differential equations with boundary 
values; elements of portlal differential equotions; applications of Fourier series and 
other methods to the solutions of certain boundary value problems in partiol differen- 
tial equations; harmonic functions. 

Staff 

MA 521 ADVANCED GEOMETRY 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

Coordinates in space; direction angles and cosines; planes, lines, points; matrices; 
surfaces and curves; quadric surfaces; transformations; analysis of general equation 
of degree 2; matrix algebra and its applications; introduction to algebraic geometry. 

Staff 

MA 522 THEORY OF PROBABILITY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 401 

Definitions, discrete and continuous sample spaces, combinatorial analysis. Sterling's 
formula, simple occupancy and ordering problems, conditional probability, repeated 
trials, compound exper'ments, Bayes' theorem, binomial, Poisson and normal distri- 
butions, the probability integral, random variables, expectotion. 

Staff 

MA 532 ADVANCED DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 401 

Series solutions of differential equations; approximate methods; the gamma functions; 
Bassel functions; Legendre polynomials; introduction to the solution of partial differential 
equations and applications. 

MA 533 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

Evolution of the number systems; trends in the development of modern mathematics; 
lives and contributions of outstonding mathematicians. 

Staff 

244 



MATHEMATICS 



MA 535 AN INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS 3(3-0) t 

Prerequisites: MA 401 and any other advanced course 

Introduction to the theory of both analog and digital computers; " number systems, error 
onolysis, types of computers and memory systems, experience in programming for IBM 
end GEDA equipment that is on the Campus. 

MA 541 VECTOR ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 401 

The algebra of vectors and dyadics; elementary space geometry in vector form; scalar 
ond vector differentiation of scalar, vector and dyadic functions; curvillinear coordinates; 
line, surface, and volume integrols; integral transformations; applications. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MA 602 PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 51 I, 512 (One year of advanced calculus) 

Portial differentiation, functional dependence, envelopes, eliminants, Lagronge's equa- 
tion, general and complete integrals, non-linear equations of first and higher orders; 
Fourier series with applications to problems in vibrations, heat and fluid flow, electricity; 
boundary value problems. 

Mr. Mumford 

MA 604 ORTHOGONAL FUNCTIONS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 512 (One year of advanced calculus) or consent of the instructor 
The development of the theory and properties of general orthogonal functions; appli- 
cations to Fourier, Bessei, Legendre, Hermitian, Loguerre and Tchebycheff types of 
orthogonal functions. Methods developed here will be used in the solution of problems 
from physics and engineering. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 611 COMPLEX VARIABLE THEORY AND APPLICATIONS 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 511, 512 (One year advanced calculus) 

Elementory functions; analytic functions and Cauchy-Ricmann equations; conformol 
mapping and applications; Taylor and Laurent series; contour integration and residue 
theory; the Schwarz-Chnstoffel transformation. 

Mr. Bullock 

MA 612 ADVANCED COMPLEX VARIABLE THEORY AND APPLICATIONS 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 61 1 

A continuotion of MA 611. Further development of residue theory; further applications 
of conformol mapping to flow phenomena; multiple-valued functions and Riemann sur- 
faces; analytic continuation; elliptic functions; differential equotions. 

Mr. Bullock 

MA 622 ADVANCED ALGEBRA 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 202 (One year of calculus) 

Introduction to matrices; vector spaces; equivalence, ronk, inverse of matrices; deter- 
minants; congruence; quadratic forms; polynomials over a field; similarity choracter- 
istic roots. 

Messrs. Nohikian, Strobel 

MA 623 CALCULUS OF FINITE DIFFERENCES AND DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS 3(3-0) s 
Prerequisite: MA 401 

Symbolic methods, generating functions, factorial, gamma, and beta functions; binomiol 
coefficients, methods of summation; the numbers and polynomiols of Bernoulli, Boole, 
Euler, Sterling; interpolation; difference equations. 

Mr. Levine 

MA 632 OPERATIONAL MATHEMATICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 61 I or consent of instructor 

Laplace transform ond applications to solutions of ordinary and partial differential 
equations arising from engineering problems. Fourier Integral and Fourier transforms 
ond applications. 

Mr. Cell 

MA 633 ADVANCED OPERATIONAL MATHEMATICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 632 

(This course will ordinarily be offered in alternate years) 
Extended development of the Laplace ond Fourier transforms, Honkel ond other trons- 
forms in solution of problems in ordinory and partial differentiol equotions and in 
difference equations; Sturm-Liouville. 

Mr. Cell 

245 



MATHEMATICS 



MA 635 MATHEMATICS OF COMPUTERS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 512 and 535 

Corequisite: MA 622 

Boolean Algebra and logical design; advanced programming including abstract methods; 

error analysis, special techniques; applications to solution of problems in linear ond 

nonlinear ordinary ond partial differentiol equations, systems of simultaneous lineor 

algebraic equations, integral equations, etc. 

Messrs. Bullock, Cell 

MA 641 CALCULUS OF VIBRATIONS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: MA 51 1 

The simplest problem of the Calculus of Voriotions in detail; variable and end-points; 

iso-perimetric problems; Hamilton's Principle; Least Action Principle; generalizations. 

Mr. Winton 

MA 651 EXPANSION OF FUNCTIONS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 61 1 and 632 or consent of instructor 

(Course offered in alternate years) 
Expansion of functions of one or several variables in Taylor series; asymptotic series, 
infinite products, partial fractions, continued fractions, series of orthogonal functions; 
Fuchsion theory in ordinary differential equations. 

Mr. Cell 

MA 661 TENSOR ANALYSIS I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: MA 512, 541 

Recommended (but not required) MA 521, 602, 622 
The basic theory; tensor algebra, tensor calculus; invariant theory; quadratic differential 
forms; covariant differentiation, curvature tensor; geometric applications, Riemannion 
spaces, parallelism, geodesies, normal coordinates; generalized vector analysis; physicdV 
applications: Dynamics, Lagrange's equations, generalized coordinates; the geometry 
of dynomics; kinematic and action line elements, holonomic and non-holonomic sys- 
tems; configuration space, dynamics in n-dimensions. 

Mr. Levine 

MA 662 TENSOR ANALYSIS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: MA 661 

Continuation of physical applicotions. Elasticity: finite strains, equations of compati- 
bility, strain invariants, stress tensor, equations of motion, generalized Hooke's law, 
isotropic stress-strain relations; Hydrodynamics: perfect fluids, viscous fluids, viscosity 
tensor; Equations of motion; Electromagnetic theory: Maxwell's equations, plane waves, 
stress-energy tensor; Relativity: Lorentz transformation, field equations, Schworz-child 
solution, planetary orbits. 

Mr. Levine 

MA 681,682 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor 

Elective 
This course provides and opportunity for small groups of graduate students to study, 
under the direction of qualified members of the professional staff, advanced topics 
in their special fields of interest. 

Graduate Staff 

MA 691 RESEARCH IN MATHEMATICS Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and opproval of advisor 
Individual research in the field of mathematics. 

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION— _ _ _ 

ED 470 METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS 3(3-0) f 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials and evaluation practices appropriate for 
teachers of mathemotics at the secondary level. 

ED 471 STUDENT TEACHING IN MATHEMATICS 10(2-20) f 

This course is intended to provide the prospective teacher with on opportunity to get 
experience in the skills and techniques involved in teaching mathematics. Each student 
during the senior year will spend one quarter off-campus in a selected center. In 
addition to acquiring the necessary competencies for teaching mathematics, the stu- 
dent teacher will also have an opportunity to become familiar with the total school 
program ond to participate in as many community activities as time will permit during 
the period of student teaching. 

ED 475 METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE 3 (3-0) f 

A study of the purposes, methods, materials and evaluation practices appropriate for 
teachers of physical and natural science at the secondary level. 

246 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



ED 476 STUDENT TEACHING IN SCIENCE 10(2-20) f 

This course is intended to provide the prospective teacher with on opportunity to get 
experience in the skills and techniques involved in teaching science. Each student 
during the senior year will spend one quarter off-compus in a selected center. In ad- 
dition to acquiring the necessary competencies for teaching science, the student teach- 
er will also have an opportunity to become familiar with the total school progrom 
and to participate in as many community activities as time will permit during the 
period of student teaching. 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



ME 101,102 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I, II 2(0-4) f s 

Corequisite: MA 1 01 or MA 1 1 1 

The objective of these courses is to teach the student the proper methods and pro- 
cedures for interpreting this medium of communication by the various theories and 
proctices in the graphical field. Emphasis will be placed on instrument practice; 
geometrical construction; free hand technical sketching of oil projects; completion of 
prepared worksheets; projections; sections; auxiliary projections; revolution; pictorial 
projections; fasteners, intersection and development; details and assemblies; charts ond 
graphs; trocinq and demonstrotions in various reproductions; geometrical mognitudes 
represented by points, lines, planes and solids with emphasis upon visualization. 

ME 271, 272 AIR CONDITIONING DRAWING I, II 2(0-4) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 1 02 

Required of sophomores in Heating and Air Conditioning 
Drawing board work on heating symbols; sheet metal drawing, duct layout, steam 
piping (single line, double line, isometric and other pictorials); hot water and other 
piping, valves, traps, filters, and miscellaneous equipment; boiler hookups and con- 
nections: compressor and condenser layout; use of catalog data and tables as opplied 
to drafting practices. 

ME 301 ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I 3(3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 201 

Fundamental laws of energy transformations with emphasis on the First and Second 
Laws: behavior of gases and vapors; elementary applications. 

ME 302 ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 30) 

A continuation of Engineering Thermodynamics I for Mechanical Engineering juniors. 
Thermodynamics of gaseous mixtures, combustion, gas compressors, steam turbines, 
refrigeration, air conditioning, internal combustion engines, and gas turbines. 

ME 303 ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS III 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

A continuation of Engineering Thermodynamics I for non-Mechanical Engineering students. 
Applications of fundamental thermodynamic principles, particularly in the Heat Power 
field, elements of heat transfer 

ME 304 FUNDAMENTALS OF HEAT POWER 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Energy and energy tronsformations, including a brief discussion of measurements of 
quantities involved. Properties of working substonces, particularly steam. Elementary 
combustion of fuels. Steom power cycles and applications to steam turbines. Elements 
of Heat Transfer. 

ME 305,306 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY I, II 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisite: ME 301, 302 

Instrumentation os applied to pressure, temperature, ipecd, power, and fluid flow 

measurements; determinotion of properties of fuels and lubricants; applications of 

instrumentation to determination of characteristics of nozzles, pumps, turbines and 

compressors. 

ME 311 KINEMATICS 3(1-6) i or s 

Prerequisites: ME 102, EM 311 

Corequisite: EM 312 

Required of juniors in ME and MEA. 
This course is a study of kinemotics of machines and consists of a systemotic study 
of the displacements, velocities, ond occelerations which occur in mechanisms. 

ME 312 DYNAMIC ANALYSIS 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisites: ME 31 1 

Required of juniors in ME 
The analysis and control of forces in machines. Includes inertia forces, free and forced 
vibrotions, ond control systems. 

247 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



ME 351 ELEMENTS OF AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 3 (3-0) f 

Prereqursites: MA 202, PY 202 
Corequisite: EM 31 2 
The airplane and its component parts, terminology, basic fluid mechanics ond the 
principles of flight, airfoil charocteristics, and an introduction to performance and 
stability anolysis. 

ME 352 AERODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 351, MA 401 

Fundamental concepts underlying experimentol aerodynamics, the aerodynomicist's data, 
elementary flow theory, Reynolds number and the effect of viscosity, Mach number 
and compressibility, finite wing theory. 

ME 371,372 ELEMENTS OF HEAT POWER I, II 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: MA 201, PY 212 

Required of juniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
Basic laws of thermodynamics; applications to gaseous mixtures, combustion, compres- 
sors, refrigeration, heating and air conditioning; principles of steam power plants with 
emphasis on generation of steam and availability of by-product steam for heating 
purposes. 

ME 375,376 AIR CONDITIONING LABORATORY I, II 1 (0-3) f s 

Concurrent with ME 371, 372 

Required of juniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
The use, limitation and calibration of instruments for the measurement of tempera- 
ture, pressure, power, speed and fluid flow; measurement of properties of fuel and 
lubricants; determinations cf characteristics of pumps, compressors and turbines. 

ME 377 BUILDING MECHANICS A 3(3-0) s 

For third year Architecture students only 

Heating principles, systems and control; air conditioning principles, systems and con- 
trols; fuels, ventilation; pum.ps; and acoustical control. 

ME 378 BUILDING MECHANICS B 3(3-0) f 

For fourth year Architecture students only 

Principles of plumbing including venting, drainage, demand and load calculations, 
water distribution, pipe sizing, storm drainage, sprinkler systems; elevators and con- 
veyors; illumination, lighting and power circuits, panels and service connections and 
codes. 

ME 379 MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT OF BUILDING 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 371 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
Study of mechanical equipment of buildings including elevators, pumps, drainage and 
venting, pipe sizing of water lines, hot water storage and distribution, sprinkler systems, 
State and local codes for plumbing, heating, electrical and building trades; acoustical 
control, and the principles of wiring specifications for the mechanical trades. 

ME 381,382 AIR CONDITIONING I, II 3(3-0) s f 

Prerequisite: ME 371 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
Principles of heating and air conditioning and their applications to the design and 
operation of heotinq and air conditioning systems; methods of controls of various com- 
ponent parts of such systems. 

ME 401 POWER PLANTS 3 (3-0) t or s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

Application of thermodynamics, economics and principles studied in other basic courses 

of the mechanical engineering curriculum to the engineering of thermal power plants 

including the energy balance, combustion, steam generators, prime movers, heat trans- 
fer devices, compressors, pumps and auxiliaries. 

ME 403 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 2(2-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

The principles of thermodynamics, mechanics, and kinematics as applied to the design, 

construction, and operation of the internal combustion engines. 

ME 405,406 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY III, IV 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 306 

Determinations of performance of heat power equipment with emphasis on heat trans- 
fer and fluid flow. 

248 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



ME 410 JET PROPULSION 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 and ME 352 or EM 430 

Application of fundamental principles of thermodynomics and the mechanics of a com- 
pressible fluid to the processes of jet-propulsion and turbo-propeller aircraft; the effect 
of performance of components on performance of engine; anolysis of engine perform- 
ance parameters. 

ME 411,412 MACHINE DESIGN II, III 3(1-6) f s 

Prerequisites: For ME 411: EM 321, for ME 412: ME 311, 411 

Required of seniors in Mechanical Engineering 
A study of the methods of designing machine elements to withstand steady end varying 
forces and to operate without excessive weor at friction areas. Elementary stress analysis 
is followed by combined stresses, applied to such elements as keys, shafts, springs, 
bearings, belting, clutches, brakes, frames, and gears. 

ME 441,442 TECHNICAL SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Elective for juniors or seniors in ME 
Meetings once a week for the delivery and discussion of student papers on topics of 
current interest in Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 453 APPLIED AERODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Determination of design data, tunnel wall and ground effect interference corrections, 
spanwise and chordwise load distributions, performance estimation, and stability and 
control anolysis. Attention Is given to transonic and supersonic aerodynamics. 

ME 455,456 AERONAUTICAL LABORATORY I, 11 1 (0-3) f s 

Prerequisites: ME 306, 352 

Demonstration of wind tunnel testing methods and principles of fluid motion. Aero- 
dynamic tests of airplane components and complete models. Calibration of instruments 
and other laboratory exercises related to oeronautical engineering. 

ME 459 AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 351, EM 321 

Theory of aircraft structures, design principles and methods of stress analysis, emphasis 
on thin-walled structures. 

ME 461,462 AIRPLANE DESIGN I, II 3(1-6) f s 

Prerequisites: For ME 461, ME 351; for ME 462; ME 461, 459 

Design procedure, preliminary layout from design specifications, weight and balonce 
performonce estimation, control and stability onalysis, principles of stress analysis. 

ME 473 REFRIGERATION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 372 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
The fundamental principles of refrigeration, the performance of various types of re- 
frigerating machines and their applications to air conditioning; controls of such systems. 

ME 475,476 AIR CONDITIONING LABORATORY III, IV 1 (0-3) f s 

Concurrent with ME 481, 482 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
The testing of heat transfer equipment including feed water heaters, radiators, convectors, 
unit heaters, heating panels; heating boilers, hot air furnaces, stokers, oil burners; oir 
conditioners of both the spray and coil types evaporative condensers. 

ME 481,482 AIR CONDITIONING DESIGN I, II 3(1-6) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 381 

Required of seniors in Heating and Air Conditioning 
The design, layout and cost estimates of various types of heating and air conditioning 
systems. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ME 501 STEAM AND GAS TURBINES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and EM 430 or ME 352 

Fundamental analysis of the theory and design of turbomachinery flow passages: con- 
trol ond performance of turbomachinery; gas-turbine engine processes. 

ME 502 HEAT TRANSFER 3 (3-0) f or s 

Prerequisite: ME 301 

A study of the fundamental lows of heat tronsfer by conducting convection and radia- 
tion; steady ond unsteody stotes heat transfer; elementary application to heot trons- 
fer equipment. 

249 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



ME 507,508 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE FUNDAMENTALS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

The fundamentals common to internal combustion engine cycles of operation. The Otto 
engine: corburetion, fuel distribution, flame propagation, normal and knocking com- 
bustion, throttling, pumping, volve and spark timing, and altitude effects; the Diesel 
engine: injection and spray formation fuel rating, otomization, penetrotion, diesel knock, 
combustion, pre-combustion, and scavenging as applied to reciprocoting and rotary 
engines. 

Stoff 

ME 509,510 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE LABORATORY 2(0-6) f s 

Corequisite: ME 507 

Laborotory exercises in the fields of spark-ignition and compression-ignition heat engines. 

Staff 

ME 511,512 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE FUELS 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A development of the formation, composition, processing, and treatment of gaseous, 
liquid, solid, and colloidal fuels, their preparotion combustion ignition temperatures, 
inflammability, products of combustion, specifications, CRC tests and impurity determina- 
tions, as they would influence the design , operation, and maintenance of the internal 
combustion engine. The potentialities of new sources of energy are explored. 

Staff 

ME 513 ENGINE DESIGN 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 507 

Diesel engine parts, sub-assemblies, components, and their bearings and supports are 
studied from the ospect of strength, stress distribution, materials, method of manufacture, 
finishes and treatment. Frames, bases, moving parts, components and accessories are 
designed around standards adopted by the industry. Welding, casting, and forging 
practices of the industry are studied. 

Staff 

ME 514 DIESEL ENGINE APPLICATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Corequisite: ME 508 
A study of the application of the Diesel engine in the fields of transportation, portable 
power plants, and stationary power plants. Case histories and methods for the selection 
of Diesel engines to satisfy the power requirements of each field are investigated. 

ME 515 EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 3(2-3) f 

Prerequisites: ME 312, EM 321 

Stresses determined experimentally by photoelasticity methods, by mechanical and 
electrical strain qaqes, by brittle coatings, etc. Effects of varying stresses. 

ME 517 LUBRICATION 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: EM 430 

The theory of viscous and boundary lubrication. Bearing design from various approaches. 
Thermal equilibrium. Properties of lubricants. 

ME 536 AIRCRAFT ENGINES 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

Spark-ignition, compression-ignition, and jet engines are studied from the standpoint of 
design, construction, and operation and as they apply to aircraft. 

Staff 

ME 545,546 PROJECT WORK IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING I, II 2(0-6) f s 

Individual or group assigned design, construction, anolyticol or experimental projects 
in Mechanicol Engineering. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ME 551 FLYING QUALITIES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Evaluation of flylnq qualities of airplanes, important factors and criteria for design, 
analysis of stick-fixed and stick-free control and stability, maneuvering stability, lateral 
controllability, and stick force determination. 

ME 552 AIRCRAFT APPLIED LOADS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 453 

Determination of aerodynamics loads, maneuvering and gust loads, V-g diagram, span- 
wise distributions on unswept and swept wings, dynamic flight loads. Consideration of 
the load modifications in the transonic flight range. 

ME 553 PROPELLER AND ROTARY WING DESIGN 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

A study of the design of aircraft propellers and rotary wing theory and design. Discus- 
sion of problems of performance evaluation, control and stability, as applied to rotat- 
ing wing aircraft. 

250 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ME 554 ADVANCED AERODYNAMIC THEORY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 453 

Development of fundamentol aerodynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathematical analy- 
sis ond derivation of equations of motion, airfoil theory and comparison with experimental 
results. Introduction to supersonic flow theory. 

ME 562 ADVANCED AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES 3 (3-0) $ 

Prerequisite: ME 459 

Development of methods of stress analysis for aircraft structures, special problems in 
structural design, stiffened panels, rigid fromes, indeterminote structures, generol re- 
laxation theory. 

ME 571 AIR CONDITIONING 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

Principles of heating and ventilation; warm air, steam and hot-water heating systems; 
air conditioning. 

ME 572 REFRIGERATION 3 (3.0) $ 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

An analysis of the simple, compound, centrifuqol and multiple effect compression sys- 
tem, the steam jet and the absorption systems of refrigeration. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ME 601,602 ADVANCED ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I, II 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 302 or ME 303 

First and Second Laws; theory of variable specific heats; general equations of thermo- 
dynamics; characteristic equations of state; reduced coordinates; prediction of prop- 
erties of gases and vapors; chemical equilibrium; metastable states; thermodynamics of 
fluid flow. 

ME 603 ADVANCED POWER PLANTS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 401 

A critical analysis of the energy balance of thermal power plants thermodynamics and 
economic evaluation of alternate schemes of development; study of recent develop- 
ments in the production of powci. 

ME 604 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ME 302, 502, EM 430, PY 419 

Resources of fuels, power reactors, reactor materiols ond properties, coolants, pumps, 
heat exchangers, nuclear gas turbine power plants, nuclear steam power plants special 
purpose plants, the economics of nuclear power and selected topics on shielding waste 
disposal and health precautions. 

Mr. Lee 

ME 605,606 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE CALCULATIONS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 401 

An advanced study of the conversion of chemical energy in spark-ignition ond compres- 
sion-ignition engines as influenced by Gibbs phase rule, Gibbs-Dolton law, fugaclty of gas 
mixtures, in the analysis of conventional engine cycles, compound power cycles, closed 
cycles and Kreislouf cycle, in the determination of efficiencies ond performance as 
functions of power output and ambient conditions. Kadenocy and inertio charging effects 
on two-cycle engines are analyzed. 

ME 607,608 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE VIBRATION ANALYSIS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: MA 401 

Corequisites: ME 507, 508 
Equivalent elastic systems and conf igurotions for internal combustion engines and their 
rotating and reciprocating masses, elasticities of crankshofts, drive shafts, and couplings, 
methods of calculating natural frequencies, elastic modes, exciting torques, and stresses, 
energy obsorbing and dynamic dampers, vibration isolators, vibrations in engine parts 
turbine blades, valve springs, intoke and exhaust manifolds, injection pipes, ond parallel 
operation are studied mathematically ond graphically. 

Staff 

ME 609,610 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE POWER PLANT DESIGN 3(3-0) » s 

Prerequisite: ME 508 

The power requirements for typicol industrial, municipal, institutional and regional power 
plants are analyzed, survey reports and specifications compiled, design and detail layouts 
executed, and installation schedules developed with the internol combustion engine os 
the source of power. 

Stoff 

251 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 



ME 611,612 ADVANCED MACHINE DESIGN I, II 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ME 41 2 

Stress onolysls applied to advanced design problems; unsymmetric bending, curved 
beams, flat plates, non-circular members in torsion, thick walled cylinders, localized 
stresses; special problems according to the interests of the class. 

ME 613 MECHANICS OF MACHINERY 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 31 1 

Kinetics of machines, with emphasis on inertia forces; balancing of machine members 
and reciprocating machines. 

ME 641,642 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR I, II 1 (1-0) f s 

Faculty and graduate student discussions centered around current research problems 
and advanced engineering theories and developments. 

ME 645 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH 3 to 6 

Prequisite: Graduate standing in ME and approval of adviser. 
Individual research in the field of Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 651 PRINCIPLES OF FLUID MOTION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 352 or equivalent 

Co-requisite: MA 51 1 
Fundamental principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of analysis ore 
emphasized. Potential flow theory development with introduction to the effects of 
viscosity and compressibility. Two dimensional and three dimensional phenomena are 
considered. 

ME 652 DYNAMICS OF COMPRESSIBLE FLOW 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 651 

Properties of compressible fluids, equation of motion of one-dimensional motion, chan- 
nel flows, shock wave theory, methods of observation, and flows at transonic speeds. 

ME 653 SUPERSONIC AERODYNAMICS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ME 652 

Equations of motion in supersonic flow, Prandtl-Meyer turns, method of characteristics, 
hodograph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil theory, and boundary 

layer shock interaction. 

ME 654 DYNAMICS OF VISCOUS FLUIDS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: ME 651 

Development of the Navier-Stokes equations and the boundary layer theory. Laminar 

and turbulent boundary layers in theory and experiment, flow separation, and tronsi- 
tion. 

ME 671, 672 ADVANCED AIR CONDITIONING DESIGN I, II 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ME 571, 572 

The design of heating and air conditioning systems; the preparation of specifications 
and performance tests on heating and air conditioning equipment. 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING— ___ _ __ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

MIM 201, 202 STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS I, II 

3 (2-3) f s 
Prerequisite: CH 103 

I An introduction to the fundamental physical principles governing the structure and 
constitution of metallic and non-metallic materials of construction, and the relation of 
these principles to the control of properties. 

II Important applications of engineering materials and criteria for selection of materials. 

MIM 321 METALLURGY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

A general course in physical metallurgy including laboratory work. 

The constitution, structure, and properties of metals and alloys. 

MIM 331, 332 PHYSICAL METALLURGY I, II 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: CH 103, MIM 201 
Required of juniors in MTE 

The fundamental principles of physical metallurgy with emphasis on correlation be- 
tween structure, constitution, and properties of metals and alloys. A systematic de- 
velopment of the metallurgical aspects of atomic and crystalline structure, solid solu- 
tions, diffusion, precipitation hardening, elastic and plastic behavior, and recrystalli- 
zotion. 



252 



MILITARY AND AIR SCIENCE 

MIM 421, 422 METALLURGY I, II 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Required of seniors in ME 

The constitution, structure and properties of engineering ferrous and non-ferrous metals 

end alloys; influences of mechanical working and heat treatment; physical testing, 

corrosion and its prevention. 

MIM 423 METALLURGY LABORATORY 1 (0-3) f s 

Corequisite: MIM 421, or 422 

Laboratory experiments to accompany MIM 421, 422. 

MIM 445, 446 EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING I, II 3(1-6) f s 

Prerequisite; MIM 422 or approval by instructor 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific project dealing with metallurgy, 
metallogrophy, or general experimental work. A seminar period is provided, and a 
written report is required. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MIM 521, 522 ADVANCED PHYSICAL METTALLURGY I, II 3(3-0) I s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422, or approval by instructor 

Theories concerning behavior and control of engineering alloys, reaction rates in the 
solid state and alloy influences; current heat treating practices, surface treatments; 
behavior of metals at high and low temperatures; special purpose alloys; powder 
metallurgy; review of modern equipment and methods for the study of metals. 

MIM 523 METALLURGICAL FACTORS IN DESIGN 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

Study of the metallurgical factors Unat rflust be considered in using metals in design. 

MILITARY SCIENCE— THE BASIC COURSE* 

MS 101, 102 MILITARY SCIENCE I 2 (2-2) f s 

Classroom instruction is given in Military History, Organization of the Army, Indivi- 
dual Weapons and Marksmanship, and Military Courtesy. On the drill field, emphasis 
is placed on development of teamwork, esprit de corps, and essential characteristics 
of leadership. 

MS 201, 202 MILITARY SCIENCE II 2(0-4) f s 

Prerequisites: Military Science 1 or equivalent credit 

Classroom instruction is given in Map Reading, Crew-served Weapons and Gunnery. 
On the drill field, emphasis is placed on development of teamwork, esprit de corps, 
essential characteristics of leadership, and acceptonce of responsibility. 



THE ADVANCED COURSE 

MS 301, 302 MILITARY SCIENCE III 3(2-4) f s 

Prerequisites: Military Science I and II, or equivalent credit 

Classroom instruction is given in Tactics, Organization, Function and Mission of the 
Arms and Services, Methods of Instruction, Communications, and Leadership. On the 
drill field, further emphasis is pieced on acceptance of responsibility, exercise of com- 
mand, and development of self-confidence, initiative and dignity in appearance and 
demeanor 

MS 401, 402 MILITARY SCIENCE IV 3(2-4) f i 

Prerequisites; Military Science III and sotisfactory completion of six weeks' summer 
camp training. 

Classroom instruction is given in Tactics, Logistics, Operations, Personnel Management 
Militory Administration, and Service Orientation. On the drill field, emphosis is placed 
on exercise of command, planning and executing all phases of training (instruction 
in basic fundamentals, inspections, ceremonies, and competitions) and maximum de- 
velopment of teamwork, esprit de corps, ond leadership characteristics. 

253 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

AIR SCIENCE — THE BASIC COURSE* 

AS 121, 122 AIR SCIENCE I 2(2-2) t s 

Instruction is given in Introduction to Aviation, Fundamentals of Global Geography, 

Internationol Tensions and Security Organizations, ond Instruments of Notional Military 

Security, and Leadership Laboratory. 

AS 221, 222 AIR SCIENCE II 2(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite; AS I or equivalent credit 

Instruction is given in Elements of Aerial Warfare, Careers in USAF, and Leadership 

Laboratory — Cadet Non-Commissioned Officers' Training. 

THE ADVANCED COURSE 

AS 321, 322 AIR SCIENCE III 3(4-2) f s 

Prerequisites: AS I and II or equivalent credit 

Instruction is given in Air Force Commander and Staff, Problem Solving Techniques, 

Communications Process and Air Force Correspondence, Military Justice System, Applied 

Air Science, Aircraft Engineering, Navigation and Weather, Air Force Base Functions, 

and Leadership Laboratory. 

Note: Cadets attend Summer Camp after Air Science III and before taking Air Science IV. 

AS 421, 422 AIR SCIENCE IV 3(4-2) f s 

Prerequisite: AS III 

Summer Camp is critiqued. Instruction is given in Principles of Leodership and Manage- 
ment (Seminar), Career Guidance, Military Aspects of World Political Geography, Mili- 
tary Aviation and the Art of War, Briefing for Commissioned Service, and Leadership 
Laboratory. 



* All veterans in service as long as six months are excused from this course but may 
enroll in the basic course in Army or Air Force ROTC to qualify for later enrollment 
in advanced courses. See also the Division of Military and Air Science and Tactics, 
pages 1 65.-1 68. . i " ' 

MINERAL INDUSTRIES — — — — — — — — — 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING (see poges 184-186) 
GEOLOGY (see pages 224-226) 
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING (see page 252) 

MODERN LANGUAGES ______ — — — 



FRENCH 

ML 101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 3(3-0) f c 

Structure, diction, pronunciation, and other matters of technique of the language, 

supplemented by readings and translations. No previous training in the languoge 
necessary. 

ML 102 FRENCH GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 101 or equivalent 

A survey of the basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by inter- 
mediate reodings progressing to the reading of standard texts. 

ML 201* FRENCH PROSE: SELECTIONS FROM MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE 

3 (3-0) f s 
Prerequisites: ML 101, 1 02 or equivalent** 

Selected readings from literary French of the 18th and 19th centuries. Attention given 
to the attainment of skill in reading and comprehension. 

ML 202* FRENCH PROSE: FRENCH CIVILIZATION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 101, 1 02 or equivalent** 

After a premilinary survey of the land and people of France, such topics as language, 
arts, science, literature, philosophy, etc., are given consideration. Parallel readings 
and reports. 



* Courses numbered above ML 102 need not be followed as a sequence in their 
respective gamut. 
** Two years of high-school work will be considered the equivalent of ML 101 ond 102. 

254 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



ML 301 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior stonding 

Lectures illustrated by selected reodings in translation covering the development of the 
novel, the drama, the short story and the poetry of France from the 12th century to 
the present. Parallel readings and reports. No language prerequisites. 

ML 401. 402 INTRODUCTORY SCIENTIFIC FRENCH 3(3-0) ♦ s 

Prerequisites: ML 201, 202 or equivalent 

A study of scientific French of mtermodicfe difficulty, supplemented with lectures on 
terminology ond other linguistic techniques. The needs of students whose interest is 
that of the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language are constantly kept 
in view. Bosic technique of translotion explained and demonstrated by meons of per- 
sonal conferences. 

ML 501, 502 ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC FRENCH 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites; ML 401, 402 or equivalent 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, mogazines and technical 
journals. Designed to meet the needs of students whose interest in the language is 
primarily that of reading ability. Choice of reading material adjusted to individual 
needs: may be token by students of varying degrees of previous linguistic training. 

GERMAN 

ML 103 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 3 (3-0) f s 

Study of the structure and technique of the language, supplemented by easy reading 
and translations. No previous training in the language necessary. 

ML 104 GERMAN GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 103 or equivalent 

A course designed primarily for students who wish to ottoin proficiency in reading 
German. Attention given to basic grammar and vocobulorv with practice in the 
translation and interpretation of German Prose. 

ML 203* GERMAN PROSE: SELECTIONS FROM MODERN GERMAN 

LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 103, 1 04 or equivalent* * 

Readings in German Literature, a study of representative authors and their contribu- 
tion to the development of the German language and culture. Parallel readings and 
reports. 

ML 204 GERMAN PROSE: GERMAN CIVILIZATION 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 103, 104 or equivalent** 

Readings in the history and customs of Germany, supplemented by lectures on such 

topics OS lonquaqe, arts, science, philosophy, etc. Parallel readings and reports. 

ML 303 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequiite: Junior or senior standing 

The study of various types of German Literature. A brief outline of German literary 

development. Parallel reodings in translotion. No previous training in the longuoge 

necessary. 

ML 403. 404 INTRODUCTORY SCIENTIFIC GERMAN 3 (3-0) f $ 

Prerequisites: ML 203, 204 or equivalent 

A study of scientific German of intermediate difficulty supplemented with lectures on 
terminology and other linguistic techniques. The needs of students whose interest is 
that of the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language ore constantly kept 
in view. Basic technique of translation explained and demonstrated by means of per- 
sonal conferences. 

ML 503. 504 ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC GERMAN 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 403, 404 or equivalent 

Reading and translations of relatively difficult technical German, supplemented by 
lectures on terminology, word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic techniques. 
Designed to meet the needs of students whose interest in the language in primorly 
that of reading ability. Choice of reading moterial adjusted to individual needs; may 
be taken by students of varying degrees of previous linguistic training. 

SPANISH 

ML 105 ELEMENTARY SPANISH 3 (3-0) t i 

Structure, diction, pronunciation, ond other matters of technique of the language, 
supplemented by eosy readings No previous training in the language necessary. 



•Courses numbered obove ML 104 need not be followed as a sequence in their 
respective gamut. 
••Two years of high-school work will be considered the equivolent of ML 103 and 104. 

255 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



ML 106 SPANISH GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML ] 06 or equivalent 

A survey of the basic elements of grammar occompanled and illustrated by intermed- 
iote readings progressing to the reading of standard texts. 

ML 205* SPANISH PROSE: IBERIA 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites' ML 105, 106 or equivolent** 

Emphasis is placed upon translating Spanish prose and developing vocabulary. The read- 
ings give the student a comprehensive picture of the culture, geography, history and 
economy of Spain. 

ML 206 SPANISH PROSE: HISPANO-AMERICA 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: ML 105, 106 or equivalent 

Emphasis is pieced upon translating Spanish prose and developing vocabulary. The read- 
ings give the student a comprehensive picture of the culture, geography, history and 
economy of the Spanish American countries. 

ML 305 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Lecture illustrated by selected reading in translation covering the development of the 
novel, drama, short story and poetry of Spoln from 1300 to the present. Parallel 
reading and reports by students. 

ML 307, 308 TECHNICAL SPANISH 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 205 or equivalent 

A study of technical and industrial literature. Particular attention given to the special 
terminology characteristic of such literature v^ith a view to the acquisition of a practical 
vocabulary. Individual conferences and reports. 

ML 405, 406 SCIENTIFIC SPANISH 3 (3-0) f s 
Prerequisites: ML 307, 308 or equivalent 

A study of scientific literature appearing in current bulletins, magazines, ond technical 

journals. Students given the opportunity of working a translation project in connection 

with their subject of major interest. Special attention given to the comprehension of the 

thought of the article under consideration and to its accurate rendition into English. 
Parallel readinns, reports, and conferences. 

ENGLISH (FOREIGN STUDENTS) 

ML 107 ELEMENTARY ENGLISH: PRONUNCIATION 3(3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the pronunciation and comprehension of American 
English. Through oral reports students are encouraged to improve their diction and 
pronunciation. Comprehension is approached through dictation and lectures. Attention 
to grammar and spelling is given as individual problems arise. 

ML 108 ELEMENTARY ENGLISH: READING 3(3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the rapid comprehension of written English without 
the necessity of the student's first translating the material into his own language. 
Exercises ore given in paraphrasing the material read. Continued practice in pronuncia- 
tion, spelling and grammar. Special attention is paid to idomatic expressions and 
Amercanisms. 

ML 109 ELEMENTARY ENGLISH: COMPOSITION 3(3-0) f s 

Emphasis in this course is laid upon the writing of English, special attention being given 
to compositions, grammatical exercises, sentence structure, spelling, and diction. 

RUSSIAN 

ML 110 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN 3(3-0) f s 

Structure and technique of the language, supplemented by easy readings and trans- 
lations. Individual reports and conferences. 

ML 212 RUSSIAN PROSE: LITERATURE 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 1 1 or equivalent 

Brief survey of Russian literature, a study of representative authors and their contri- 
bution to the development of the Russian language and literature. 

ITALIAN 

ML 112 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN 3(3-0) f s 

Structure, diction, pronunciation, and other motters of technique of the longuage, 
supplemented by easy readings, individual reports, and conferences. No previous training 
in the language required. 



'Courses numbered above ML 106 need not be followed as a sequence in their 
respective gamut. 
** Two years of high-school work will be considered the equivalent of ML 105 and 106. 

256 



MODERN LANGUAGES 



ML 113 ITALIAN GRAMMAR AND PROSE READING 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ML 1 1 2 or equivalent 

A survey of basic elements of grammar accompanied and illustrated by intermediate 
readings, progressing to the reading of stondord texts. 

GENERAL COURSES 

ML 321, 322 ROMANCE LITERATURE 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

A course cutting across longuage barriers to illustrate the most outstanding literary 
productions of France, Spain, Italy and Portugal and showing the cultural and social 
pattern of these nationalities hoving a common language inheritance. Selected readings 
and reports. 

ML 323, 324 GERMANIC LITERATURE 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

A study of the literary productions in each of the various types of Germanic literature, 
ond lectures on their cultural background. Designed primarily to meet the needs of 
students who wish to upplement their knowledge of their own literature with thot of the 
literature of other civilizations. Attention is given to the literary monuments of 
Germany, Holland, Denmark, Iceland and the Scondinovian countries. No foreign 
language prerequisites. 

— — OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 

ED 420 PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE 2(2-0) f s 

This is a course designed to provide basic principles of guidance for teachers, teacher- 
counselors administrotors, and others in the school, as well as workers in other areas 
such as the community agency, business, industry, group work, and the like. Among 
the topics covered ore: need for guidance; bases of guidance services; programs of 
guidance; studying the individual; counseling for educational, vocational, socio!, and 
personal problems; group procedures in guidance. Emphasis is on the practical appli- 
cation of guidance principles and procedures. 

Instructor: Mr. Tolbert 

ED 524 OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION 2 or 3 (2 or 3-0) s 

This course is designed to prepare teachers, counselors, business and industrial per- 
sonnel workers, placement workers, and others to collect, evaluate, and use occupation- 
al ond educational information. In addition to the study of the usual source and 
types of published occupational information, attention will be given to collection 
of occupational information locally, preparation of the occupational monograph, analy- 
sis of job requirements and worker characteristics, occupational trends and factors 
affecting trends, occupational and industrial structure and classification, and the like. 
Imparting occupational information to groups and individuals by techniques such as 
the following are considered: the occupations unit in social studies and other courses, 
the occupations course, home-room activities, introducing occupational information In- 
formolly in subject matter courses, the resource file, vocational counseling. 

Instructor: Mr. Tolbert 

ED 530 GROUP GUIDANCE 2 or 3 (2 or 3-0) s 

This course is designed to help teachers, counselors, administrators, and others who 
work with groups or who arc responsible for group guidonce activities, to understand 
the theory and principles of effective group work, to develop skill in using specific 
group guidance techniques, and to plan and organize group activities in the secondary 
school and other institutions. The relationship of group activities to counseling and 
other aspects of guidance services is considered. Methods of evaluating and improv- 
ing group guidance activities are taken up. 

Instructor: Mr. Tolbert 

ED 531 INTRODUCTION TO VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION, 

PROGRAMS AND PROCESSES 3(3-1) f 

This course will serve as on introduction to the broad field of rehabilitotion service; 
and programs directed toward the restorotion of physically and or mentally disablea 
persons into employment. The course will emphasize the State-Federal, and privote 
agency programs. It will be inter-disciplinary in its approach covering the areas of 
social work, medicine, psychology, sociology and economics. Specialists or opprop/iate 
p>ersons in the above areas will be Invited to participate. Field trips to agencies will 
be required. 

Instructors: Messrs. Tolbert, Davis 

ED 590 INDIVIDUAL PROBLEMS IN GUIDANCE 3(3-0) f s 

Intended for individual or group studies of one or more of the major problems in 
Guidance ond Personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet the Interests of 
Indlvlduols. The workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects and reports 
will be developed by Indlvlduols and by groups. 

Instructors: Messrs. Anderson, Tolbert 

257 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 631 EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 3 (3-0) f 

This course aims to provide training for teachers who are part-time or full-time coun- 
selors, employment interviewers, social workers and personnel workers, who are aiding 
individuals with vocational adjustment problems. The course will cover the functions 
performed in vocational and educational guidance such as assembling and imparting 
occupational information, counseling regarding vocational and educational plans, the 
use of aptitude tests, placement in jobs and follow-up, and procedures in setting up 
services of vocational and educational guidance in schools, employment offices, and 
social service agencies. 

Instructor; Mr. Anderson 

ED 633 TECHNIQUES IN GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL 3 (3-0) s 

This course is designed to aid personnel workers in secondary schools, colleges, em- 
ployment offices, and social agencies to develop an understanding of and skill in using 
various guidance and personnel techniques. Some of the techniques to be studied in- 
tensively are: anecdotal reports, rating scales, observation, records and reports, socio- 
grams, interviewing, counseling and case study procedures. Students will become ac- 
quainted with these techniques through lectures, demonstrations, and the study of 
case histories. Attention will be given to both diagnosis and treatment. 

Instructor: Mr. Anderson 

ED 641 FIELD WORK IN OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION 2 to 9 1-6 to 27) f s 

A practical course in which the student undertakes field work in secondary schools, 
colleges, social service agencies, employment offices, and industrial establishments 
which carry on guidance and personnel work. The students may observe and participate 
in some personnel services and may study the organization and administration of the 
programs. 

Instructors: Messrs. Anderson, Tolbert, Davis 

ED 651 RESEARCH IN OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION 

AND GUIDANCE Maximum 6 credits f s 

Qualified students will conduct investigations and research in Guidance and Personnel. 
Published reports and techniques in investigation will be analyzed and evaluated. 

Instructors: Messrs. Anderson, Tolbert 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION __ — — — _ — 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PHI 201 LOGIC 3 (3-0) f s 

Language as symbol system, the formal structure of reasoning, and characteristics 

of empirical knowledge; emphasis on the establishment of more adequate reflective 
habits. 

PHI 203 EFFECTIVE LIVING 2(2-0) f s 

The meaning of personal growth and maturity; the quest for intellectual and emotional 
equilibrium in the face of the challenge which modern conditions pose for traditional 
patterns of thought and behavior; formulation of personal philosophy of life. 

PHI 205 PROBLEMS AND TtPES OF PHILOSOPHY 3 (3-0) f s 

The great philosophers of the western world, the socio-cultural heritage in which they 

worked, their major concerns and conclusions; the relation of philosophy to vital ques- 
tions of human life. 

REL 301 RELIGIOUS GROUPS AND TRENDS IN THE UNITED STATES 2(2-0) f s 

Background and characteristic beliefs of the major religious groups in the United 
States; survey of the dominant trends and movements in contemporary American re- 
ligion. 

REL 302 THE BIBLE AND ITS BACKGROUND 3 (3-0) f s 

Background of the Bible: origin, growth and development of central concepts, leading 
personalities, ond the process by which it has come to us as viewed in the light of 
modern scholarship. 

REL 303 CHRISTIAN ETHICS 2(2-0) f s 

An analysis of the major areas of modern life in the light of the ethical teachings of 

Christianity, with an examination of the religious faith upon which these teachings 
rest. 

PHI 305 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 3 (3-0) f s 

Psychological and historical roots of religious belief; science and religion; the rational 
foundations for belief in theism; the concept of God in Western thought. 

258 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



PHI 306 PHILOSOPHr OF ART 3 (3-0) f s 

Theory of beouty and aesthetic experience, analysis of specific media of artistic ex- 
pression, ond the formulation of a philosophy of art which relates the beautiful and 
the useful. 

PHI 309 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIVING 3(3-0) f s 

Secular and reliqious concepts of marriage; economic, physiological, ond socio-psycho- 
logicval aspects of premarital and marital relationships; parenthood; analysis of prin- 
ciples in terms of which value judgments relative to marriage and family living may 
be met with maximum rationality; formulation of a philosophy of marriage. 

PHI 311 PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS 2(2-0) f s 

Principles of inter-personol relationships; the enhancement of democratic values and 

the attainment of growth on the port of porent and child through the exercise of 

freedom, responsibility, and creotive octivity; consideration of conflicting theories of 
husband-wife, and parent-child relationships. 

PHI 395 PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 3 (3-0) f s 

Semantical, loqical, and cxpcnmcntol methods of investigation; intensive opplication 
of critical inquiry to o few fundamental problems including the nature of knowledge 
and its validation, ond value judgment; major objective to offord the student personal 
porticipotion in ond acquaintance with philosophical onalysis as intellectual tool with 
wide applicability. 

PHI 401 FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE 3 (3-0) f s 

Nature and validity of knowledge, basic concepts of modern science, scientific method, 
and the implications of the philosophy of modern science for ethics, social philosophy, 
and the nature of reality. 

REL 403 RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD 3 (3-0) f s 

Background, general characteristics, and basic teachings of the major living religions 
of the world; consideration of contemporary secular movements that are in o sense 
religions. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PHI 501 SOCIAL ETHICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite; Six term credits in Philosophy or related fields 

Mojor ethical theories and the issue posed as basic in each; the problem of value 
in the light of modern knowledge; ethical principles as ground for cultural unity; the 
applicability of ethics to problems of policy determinotion. 

REL 502 PROBLEMS OF RELIGION 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Six term credits in Religion or related fields 

Religious beliefs and trends in on age of science; the place ond basic functions of the 

church as it influences ond is influenced by the modern world. 

______ — — — PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



The college requires all freshmen ond sophomores to take physical education unless 
they ore veterans or are excused by the Health Service Physician for physical reosons. 
Normally, credit in four physicol education courses is required for graduation. All 
physical education students must poss a swimming test. 

Activities in the physical education progrom are divided into two progrom oreos: Pre- 
scribed Sports and Controlled Elective Sports. Insofar as facilities ond staff permit, 
every effort is mode to direct students into activities which will meet their individuol 
needs. The bases for determining individual needs ore as follows: 

A medical examinotion. In cose a student has some unusual physicol impoirment, the 
college physician will either excuse him from physicol educotion or recommend o 
special type of activity suitobic to the particular need. 

A swimming test All freshmen and transfer students who foil to pass the swimming 
test ore immediately assigned to beginning swimming. Students who pass the test 
ore classified primarily on the basis of their scores in the othlctic obility test. 
An othletic obility test. Students who score below the 1 5th percentile ore enrolled in 
Fundamental Sports for two semesters, or until their improvement indicates that they 
ore ready for Basic Sports. 

Students who score between the 15th and 75th percentiles ore ploced in Bosic Sports 
for two semesters, or until their improvement indicates thot they ore reody for the 
Controlled Elective Sports Areo. 

Students who score obout the 75th percentile ore immediotely directed to the Con- 
trolled Elective Sports Areo. 

Normolly, all second year students porticipote in the Controlled Elective Sports Area. 
This port of the progrom is controlled to the extent that a student moy not receive 
credit in more thon two team sports. 

259 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



A hygiene knowledge test. All freshmen must complete satisfactorily a half semester 
of hygiene or show adequate proficiency as measured by a Heolth Knowledge Test 
given during Orientation Week. Students who are exempted from Hygiene must sub- 
stitute on activity. 
A personal interview with the student. 

COURSES 

PE 101, 102 1 (0-2) f s 

PE 201, 202 1 (0-2) f s 

PE 301, 302, 303, 304 JUNIOR AND SENIOR ELECTIVES 1 (0-2) f s 

Note: Juniors and seniors may elect any activity from the Controlled Elective Sports 
Area in which they have not previously received credit. Transfer students and veterans 
who cannot swim will be urged to elect beginning swimming. 

ACTIVITIES IN PRESCRIBED SPORTS AREA 

COURSES 

a. Beginning Swimming: 

Offered in the fall semester. A course designed for meeting the college swimming re- 
quirement and for preparing the student for intermediate Swimming 

b. Fundamental Sports: 

Offered in the fall semester. A course designed for the low skilled student where a 
particular type of activity can be given to meet his special needs. 

c. Fundamental Sports: 

Offered in the spring semester. (Prerequisite: 101b) 

A sequence course designed f> r the low skilled students who hove not qualified for 

the other oreos of the progrom. 

d. Bosic Sports: 

Offered in the fall semester. A course designed to acquaint the medium skilled student 
with appropriate activities in both team and individual self-testing Items. 

e. Basic Sports: 

Offered in the spring semester. (Prerequisite: lOld) 

A sequence course designed for the medium skilled student who has not qualified for 

the Controlled Elective Sports Area of the program. 

f. Hygiene: 

Offered in the second half of the foil semester and in the first half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to acquaint the student with factual materials reloted 
to body core and healthful living. 

ACTIVITIES IN CONTROLLED ELECTIVE SPORTS AREA 

Team Sports 

z. Basketball: 

Offered in the second half of the fall semester and in the first half of the spring 
semester. A course designed to cover the fundamentals of shooting, offensive and de- 
fensive strategy, history and rules. 

y. Football (Touch): 

Offered in the first half of the fall semester. A course designed to cover the funda- 
mentals of offensive and defensive play. 

X. Soccer: 

Offered in the first half of the fall semester. A course designed to acquaint the 

student with the fundamental skills and to provide out-of-door activity in a team 

sport. 

w. Softball: 

Offered in the second half of the spring semester. A course designed to include the 

fundamentals, history, and rules of the game. 

v. Volleyball: 

Offered in the first half of the fall semester and in the entire spring semester. A 
course designed to include the fundamentals, history, and rules of the game. 
Individual Sports 



260 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

u. Bodminton: 

o.nn^r'^n'"tHoro ^^°1'^ ^°,^l °^ ^ x^ 'P""« ^^'"ester. A coursc designed to give the be- 

t. Bowling (Duck Pins): 

Offered in the second hoif of the fall semester and m th» ♦.,.♦ h^i« «« tu 
semester. Fundomentols of the stance, o^^ro^ch, end "dehvery^'Le ought toJ^lh';' 
s^e'lt-nitn's. (';:el2.l^0°r^ °''' ^'^"^^^' ^^^°^^ °' ^^^^ — «- s1ud^n7s''tak^°^?:S; 
s. Bowling (Ten Pins): 

r. Boxing: 

?f\!Zn1 i"t^!^^^,'T"^ ^°'^ °,* ^!}^ ^°" ^«'^«^er. A course designed to acquoint the 
?ichn?ques fundamentals, history, and rules, with special emphasis on^ defensivl 

q. Golf: 

Offered in the first holf of the fall semester and in the second half of the sorino 

HiThf?;- ^""'M'^r'l"^'' ^°' '^^ beginner; grip, stance, swing and ue of the van^us 
clubs, together with the history and etiquette of play. various 

p. Gymnastics: 

Offered in the secorid half of the fall semester ond in the first half of the sprmo 
semester. A course designed to include the fundomentols of simple gyr^nastic s?unt1 
rules ' ' "^^ ^^''^' ^'^^ ^°'' '°P"' ""'^ ^°»*- *°9^»^e^ ^'*^ h!slory and 

i. Handball: 

mentok tno^h»r *°![, S"» '^''"5 ^^-^^sters. A course designed to include the funda- 
mentals, together with history and rules. 

k. Swimming (Intermediate): 

?nmn!ljr» ^*!^ ^°!! °"'^ "?""5 semesters. A course designed to give the student 
competence in four bosic strokes ond two dives, preparatory to the Life Soving Program 

j. Swimming (Senior Red Cross Life Saving)- 

Offered in the spring serriester. Prerequisite: Intermediate Swimming or the equivolent 
th. rii ^^k"^? '^T'^ !S ?"°c^^ ^^^oden^s for o Senior Red Cross Life Saving certificate ond 
the possibility of a Water Safety Instructor's rating. n-n-o'e ana 

m. Tennis (Beginning): 

2.m!.?tl '"a ^^^ first half of the fall semester and in the second holf of the spring 
m^ntni t.""''^'^"'^"^'' *° ^'^^ *^^ beginner o thorough knowledge of the fundo- 
t^lgome ° ''^"^'°' "^""^'^^^^ °^ '^^ ^''*°'y- ^"les ond basi? strotegy of 

n. Tennis (Advonced): 

Offered in the first holf of the foil semester and in the second holf of the sonnn 

onTthl' ^'^'^^^^il'*^- Beq.nning Tennis or its equivalent. Bosic strokes ore reviewed 

ond the more difficult strokes fought Emphasis is placed upon strategy during ^ov 

and upon o more foctual knowledge of the gome ond court etiquette. 

i. Wrestling: 

Offered in the first holf of the foil semester ond in the first holf of the sprino semp^t^r 

A course designed to give the fundomentols, history ond rules ^ semester. 

Vorsity Sports 



Note: Students moy elect in this oreo with the opprovol of the cooch Vors.tv 
ore identified with double letters. toocn. vorsity 

oo. Boseboll 

bb. Bosketboll 

cc. Cross Country Track 

dd. Fencing 

ec. Football 



sports 



ff. 


Golf 


3g- 


Soccer 


hh. 


Swimming 


ii. 


Trock 


jj- 


Wrestling 



261 



PHYSICS 



PHYSICS 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



PY 201, 202 GENERAL PHYSICS 5(3-4) f s; f s 

Co-requisite MA 201 

Required of sophomores in Engineering. A study of General Physics in which on analyti- 
cal approach to the Principles of Physics is used. Emphasis is placed on problem solu- 
tion and engineering applications. Recitations, demonstrated lectures, problem drill, 
and laboratory work ore coordinated to give a working knowledge of the basic 
principles of physics. Py 201, mechanics, sound, ond heat; Py 202, electricity, light, 
and modern physics. 



PY 211, 212 GENERAL PHYSICS 

Prerequisite: MA 1 1 I 

Recitations with demonstrations and laboratory work. 

Py 212, sound, light, and electricity. 



Py 211, 



4 (3-3) f s; 
mechanics 



and heat; 
1 (l-0)»s 



PY 223 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS 

Prerequisites: Py 211, MA 1 1 2 
A general course in astronomy and astrophysics. Introduction to techniques and pro- 
cedures in astronomical observations. Occasional laboratories; observations with tele- 
scope. 

PY 311 LIGHT AND COLOR IN INDUSTRY 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Survey of the fundamental principles of light and radiation; photometry, illumination 

and distrfbution of light; lighting calculations; fluorescent lighting; the physiological 

and psychological aspects of light and color; color theories, standardization of color; 

color contrast, and color harmony. Special emphasis placed on development of color 

harmony. 

PY 322 DESCRIPTIVE METEOROLOGY 2(2-0) f 

Prerequisite; PY 212 

Explanation of the weather and associated phenomena at an introductory level. Struc- 
ture of the atmosphere; instrumentation; heat balance and primary circulation of the 
atmosphere; air masses, fronts, and waves; tertiary circulations; atmosphere of the 
lowest 1 meters. 

PY 323 APPLIED METEOROLOGY 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PY 322 

Technique of application of meteorological data to problems in Engineering, Agriculture, 
Forestry, etc., where weather is a factor, using principle of expectations as the basis 
for analysis. Examples from several fields as illustrations of various analysis techniques. 

PY 327 LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN PHOTOGRAPHY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: PY 212 or equivalent 

A treatment of the general principles of photography with special applications in the 
fields of spectroqraphy, micrography. Roentgenology, and nuclear physics. 

PY 401, 402 INTERMEDIATE PHYSICS I 4(3-3) f s 

Co-requisite; MA 401 

Mechanics (401), heat, and sound (402) on an intermediate level. Intermediate Physics I, 
together with Intermediate Physics II (403, 404), constitutes on integrated study of 
classical physics at the next level above general sophomore phyics. Lectures, problems, 
and recitations, and one laboratory each week. 

PY 403, 404 INTERMEDIATE PHYSICS II 4(3-3) f s 

Co-requisite; MA 401 

Electricity and magnetism (403), and optics (404) on an intermediate level. Interme- 
diate Physics II, together with Intermediate Physics I, constitutes an integroted study 
of classical physics at the next level above general sophomore physics. Lectures, 
problems, recitations, and one laboratory each week. 

PY 407 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202 

A brief survey of the important developments in atomic and nuclear physics. Topics 
covered include: atomic and molecular structure, determination of the moss and 
charge of ions, origin of spectra, ion accelerators, nuclear reactions, and cosmic rays. 
Particular attention is paid to the practical applications of these developments. 

PY 410 NUCLEAR PHYSICS I 4(3-3) f s 
Prerequisite: PY 407 

An introductory treatment of the properties of nuclear particles and their interactions 
with matter. Consideration is given to natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear re- 
actions, fission, and the structure of simple nuclei. A three-hour laboratory is included. 



262 



P- :lis- - V-.^-^*^ 



^ {'<'-' 



PHYSICS 



PY 419 INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 2(2-0) ♦ 

Prerequisite: PY 410 ^ l^ u; t 

A survey of the cnqmeermq applications of nuclear energy. The principles ond prac- 
tices of isotope separation, production of plutonium, ond nucleor reactor operation ore 
studied along with the peace-time uses of products and by-products of nuclear re- 
actors Major engineering problems involved in each phase of the study ore defined 
and the special methods of approach indicated 



■ 4 {F i , s -^ 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 510 NUCLEAR PHYSICS II 

Hrerequisite: PY 410 

A contmuation of Physics 410 with particular emphasis on neutron physics, nuclear 
energy levels meson theory, nuclear resonance, atomic ond molecular magnetism 
§\J r iT'*^ rwiiation. Ap Jhrcc-hour^boratory is included. \ \ /" ' "3 1 

PY 518 RADIATION HAZvIrd AND PROTECTION 3 (3 01 f ^ 

Prerequisite: Py 4 1 j y-t m; x s 

The hazards from external exposure to ionizing radiation are evaluated. The dosages 
resulting from the ingestion of radioactive materials are computed. The precautionary 
methods used in radioactive work are presented. Selected biological effects of lonizina 
radiation are studied. 

PY 520 PHYSICAL TECHNOLOGY IN RADIOACTIVITY 3 (2-3) f < 

Prerequisite: PY 410 .» v* jv • » 

Emphasis in this course is on laboratory practices in detecting, handling, and quanti- 
tatively measuring radioactive samples. The preparation of samples for radioactivity 
measurements and the calculation methods used in analyzing such data are sum 
morized. At least three hours of laboratory practice per week. 

PY 526 IONIZATION PHENOMENA AND ELECTRON OPTICS 2(2-0) < 

Prerequisites PY 404, 410 * (x u; s 

Methods of producing ions, and the interaction of ions with electric and magnetic 
fields are discussed, together with a brief survey of the present status of electron optics. 

PY 530 ELEMENTARY NUCLEAR REACTOR THEORY 3 (3-0) , 

Prerequisites: PY 410! MA 511 or 532 •» v^ «; » 

A lecture course in the principles of chain reactors. Slowing down of neutrons neu- 
tron diffusion equations, space distribution of neutrons, conditions for criticality re- 
actor dimensions for simple geometries, elementary group theories and time' de- 
pendent reactor behavior. 

PY 531 NUCLEAR REACTOR LABORATORY i (0-3) f , 

Co-requisite: PY 530 ■ lu j; r s 

OtJservations on and measurements on the behavior of the nuclear reactor and cor- 
relotion with reactor theory. Experiments with apparatus involving the motion and de- 
tection of neutrons. Foil measurements of neutron flux. Irradiations in the reactor of 

PY 541, 542' ADVANCED EXPERIMENTS IN PHYSICS 1 (0-3) t « ^ 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202 i iw j; r $ 

Covers the techniques and theory of selected experiments in mechanics, heat sound 
light, or electricity. The treatment and interpretation of data are stressed 

PY 544 VIBRATION AND WAVE MOTION 3 (3 0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 401 ■» VJ "^ i 

The dynamics of vibratory and oscillatory motion. Analogies in mechanical electrical 
and acoustical vibrating systems. Analysis of wove motion and propagation in dif- 
ferent media. 

PY 545 APPLIED ACOUSTICS i li a\ , 

Prerequisite: PY 544 ' "' * 

The dynamical theory of sound. Sources of sound, measurement of sound intensity 
measurement of frequency, acoustical impedance and transmission of sound sound 
filters and resonators, acoustics of speech and hearing, reception and reproduction 
of sound, acoustics of buildings. 

PY 551 INTRODUCTION TO X-RAYS 3 (2 3> t 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202 ' 

°.'''S'":. production, absorption, single crystal diffraction, and powder diffraction ore 
studied. These basic topics are then applied to detection of defects in welds and cast- 
ings and to the determination of crystal structure and particle ond fiber size (Two 
I -hour lectures and one 3-hour lob. per week) 



263 



PHYSICS 



PY 552 INTRODUCTION TO THE STRUCTURE OF SOLIDS: 

CRYSTALLOGRAPHY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 202; PY 551 recommended 

Elementary consideration of amorphous and crystolline solids, metal conductors, and 
semi-conductors. Some optical crystallography is included. (Three 1-hour lectures per 
week.) 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PY 601, 602 ADVANCED GENERAL PHYSICS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: PY 402, MA 51 1 

Mathematical and theoretical approach to relationships between the various branches 
of physics, with applications to mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal, and vibratory 
problems. Generalization of underlying physical principles. 

PY 610 ADVANCED NUCLEAR PHYSICS * 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PY 410; PY 61 1, except by permission 

Current hypotheses of nuclear structure and reactions, including fission, theories of 
alpha emission, deuteron binding, neutron-proton scattering, the compound nucleus, 
and beta-decay. The use of neutrons in present day nuclear research is emphasized. 

PY 611, 612 QUANTUM MECHANICS 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites; PY 407, MA 532 

Theory of quantum mechanics with applicotions to otomic and molecular structure, 

scattering phenomena, and the interaction of radiation with matter. 

PY 619 HETEROGENEOUS REACTORS DESIGN 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 530 

Engineering design of heterogeneous power reoctors. Theory of resonance capture, 
thermal utilization, and flux distributions in multi-region systems. Transient and steady 
state poison effects. Heat transfer limitations in reactors. Evaluation of materials of 
construction, coolants and fuels. 

PY 621 KINETIC THEORY OF GASES 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 51 1 

The theory of molecular motion, including the velocity and density distribution func- 
tions, the phenomena of viscosity, heat conduction and diffusion; equations of state; 
fluctuations. 

PY 622 STATISTICAL MECHANICS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PY 202, MA 51 1; PY 621, except by permission 

A treatment of statistical mechonics from both the quantum and classical point of 
view. Development of theories from the thermodynamical standpoint and their prac- 
tical application. 

PY 630 HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR DESIGN 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite'. PY 530 , 

Calculations of critical loading of homogeneous power reactors, flux distribution, con- 
trol rod values, theory of two and multigroup methods, and evaluation of group con- 
stants. Uses and limitations of oge and diffusion theory. Transport theory of foil 
measurements. The time-dependent behavior of a reactor with negative temperature 
coefficient. 

PY 621, 632 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SPECTRA 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite; PY 404 

Co-requisites: Py 61 1, MA 532 
Atomic models and coupling schemes. Multiplet series, Zeeman, Poschen-Back, and 
Stark effects. Hyperfine structure and complex spectra. Spectra of polyatomic mole- 
cules. Infrared and Roman Spectroscopy, with applications to various chemical problems. 

PY 661, 662 THE SOLID STATE 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PY 552 

The electron theory of conduction, electrical and thermal conduction in solids, and 
surface phenomena, with applications to physical behavior and usage of solids. 
(Offered in 1954-55 and alternate years) 

PY 670 SEMINAR 1 (0-3) f s 

Literature surveys, written and oral presentation of papers on special topics. 

PY 690 RESEARCH 1-6 credits s 

Graduate students sufficiently prepared may undertake research in some selected 
field of Physics. 

264 



— — — — — — — — —PLANT PATHOLOGY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PP 315 PLANT DISEASES 

Prerequisites: BO 101 102 3(2-3) f 

Mr. Kelman 
PP 318 DISEASES OF FOREST TREES , ,, ,> 

Prerequisites: BO 101 102 ■» (2-3) s 

Mr. Kelmon 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PP 503 DIAGNOSIS OF PLANT DISEASES , ,, ., 

A^7udv"o7 t2-7fn°'^'°""'^.'°"^'^, '" P'°"^ Pathology and permission of mstructor ' 

(Offered in 1956 and olternate years) 

Mr, Hebert 
PP 504 PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODES , m , « 

Prerequisites: PP 315 2(1-3 t 

fodes^'^MP^thnT'^r^"'^^ °"°*°'^^' P^^Vsiology and taxonomy of plant parositic nemo- 

Mr. Sasser 
PP 515 DISEASES OF FIELD CROPS , ,, „ 

Prerequisits: PP315 3(2-2) s 

Mr. Lucas 
PP 516 DISEASES OF FRUIT CROPS , ,, „ 

Prerequisite: PP 315 3 (2-2) s 

(Offered in 1955-56) and alternate years) 

Mr. Cloyton 
PP 517 DISEASES OF VEGETABLE CROPS , ,, „ 

Prerequisite: PP315 3(2-2) s 

Mr. Winsteod 
COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PP 601 PHYTOPATHOLOGY I 

Prerequisites: PP 315 and permission of the instructor * ""*' * 

opproismg disease problems, reviewing literature lot^ro^orv ^ J u '^'" '"^'"*^* 

rrients and the evaluation and presentation of doS^ ^ greenhouse expen- 

Mr. Nielsen 
PP 602 PHYTOPATHOLOGY II 

Prerequisites: PP 3 I 5 and permission of the instructor * '*"*' » 

disIasSv" ""'^^*' °' *^" ^*'°'°^^' P°»^^°'o«V, epiphytolooy and control of plant 
(Offered in 1956-57 ond alternate years) 

Mr. Nusboum 

265 



POULTRY 



PP 611 NEMATODE DISEASES OF PLANTS 3(1-4) s 

Prerequisites: PP 504 

A study of plant diseases coued by nematodes. Special consideration will be given to 
host-parasite relationships, host ranges, and life cycles of the more important economic 
species. Principles and methods of control will be considered. 

Mr. Sasser 

PP 615 RESEARCH IN PLANT PATHOLOGY Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of adviser 

Original reseorch in connection with a thesis problem in Plant Pathology. 

Staff 

PP 617 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor 

Originol research on special problems in Plant Pathology not related to a thesis problem 

but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Staff 

PP 625 SEMINAR IN PLANT PATHOLOGY 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Consent of seminar chairman 

Discussion of phytopathological topics selected and ossigned by seminar chairmen. 

Staff 

POLITICAL SCIENCE --—_______ 

SEE HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POULTRY ____________ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PO 201 CHICKEN AND TURKEY PRODUCTION 4(3-3) f s 
Prerequisites: Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others 

Principles of broiler, market egg, hatching egg, and turkey production. Classes, breeds 

and varieties identification of chickens and turkeys. Breeding, incubation, raising, housing, 

feeding, diseose and parasite control, marketing of chickens, eggs and turkeys. 

Messrs. Brown, Martin 

PO 301 POULTRY JUDGING AND PROCESSING 4(2-6) f 

Prerequisite: Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 
Judging of poultry for egg production, breeding, market qualities; judging dressed market 
birds and eggs; processing, refrigeration, storage of poultry; candling, grading, processing 
ond storage of eggs; preparation for marketing eggs and poultry. 

Messrs. Brown, Bumgardner 

PO 302 ADVANCED POULTRY JUDGING AND PROCESSING 3(0-6) f 

Prerequisites: PO 301 

Elective for majors in Poultry Science and for others with permission of instructor 
Course consists only of laboratory work with Poultry Judging and Processing class 
(PO 301) for further practice and proficiency in poultry and egg judging and processing. 

Messrs. Brown, Bumgardner 

PO 303 BIOLOGY OF THE FOWL 3(1-6) s 

Prerequisites: Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 
A foundotion course for juniors and senior poultry courses. Macroscopic embryology of 
the chick. Dissection ond study of the gross anatomy of the chicken and turkey. 
Physiology of the tissues and organs. Endocrine control of reproduction. Formation and 
structure of the egg. 

Mr. Bumgordner 

PO 401 POULTRY DISEASES 4(3-3) s 

Prerequisites: Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 
The major infectious, non-infectious and parasitic diseases of poultry ore studied with 
respect to economic importance, etiology, susceptibility, dissemination, symptoms, 
lesions, and diognostic methods. Emphasis is ploced upon practices necessary for the 
prevention, control and treatment of each disease. 

Mr, Barber 

266 



POULTRY 

PO 402 COMMERCIAL POULTRY FARM AND HATCHERY MANAGEMENT 4(3-2) s 

Prerequisites: Required of majors in Poultry Science •• i-" *; s 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 
Principles of incubatiori of chicken and turkey eggs; hatchery manogemenf orgonizotion 
inL tf ^ZT* °H '"°"' ^°: ^^^ operation ond maintenance of a commercial poultry 
llT^^H T°* ""'^ ^*'^ production; study of the types of buildings, equipment ond 
Carol^a Probl^m""^^'^""' '"''"""" "'"'"°^^^ ""^ successful poult^r^ men*^ in North 

Mr. Brown 

PO 403 POULTRY SEMINAR 1 M m ♦ 

Prerequisite: Required of seniors in Poultry Science i U-w; t s 

nr'i"'^rM°H? °"d problems relating to poultry science and to the poultry industry 
ore assigned for orol report and discussion. Two semesters ^'v'u"-y muusrry 



Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PO 520 POULTRY BREEDING or,,,* 

Prerequisites: GN 41 1 ■* *^"'*' * 

Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 
Applicotion of genetic principles to poultry breeding, considering physical traits ond 
physiological characteristics-feother patterns, egg production, hatchaJity growth 

body conformotion, ond utility. ^^ k . <- uu.niy, growin, 

Messrs. Glazener, Martin 

PO 521 POULTRY NUTRITION 3 (2 3^ « 

Prerequisites: Required of majors in Poultry Science 

Elective for others with permission of instructor 
Z^^.T °^ P'°*^'"^' carbohydrates, fats, mmerols and vitamins required for growth egg 
ZiVT °7'^M reproduction in the chicken and turkey. Symptoms and lesions inducld 
of fpldlnoTh^'^^^"'^?."" T?"'P°^"'''"^ different types of poultry mashes and methods 
rKi/ifc w^ K ^^ mashes^ The production of certain vitomin and mineral deficiencies in 
chicks for observation and examination. 

Mr. Kelly 

PO 522 ENDOCRINOLOGY OF THE FOWL 2 17 ■i\ t 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor ' 

Jnu.r^'^^°Z"'^ '^'^^"^ " /*i"^,'^'^ ^'^^ '"P^^* *° '*^ Physiologicol importance in such 
in ncate processes as metabolism, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis is ploced upon 
r^„.»^t "J *!?' ^ fowl, but mammalian exomples ore also used to illustrate bosic 
o?Sra?ive r^otenor- '"'^'"'' °' '^^ ''^^""'^ ^"' "^^ ^°"^'dered in the selection 

Mr. Gorren 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

Groduote courses moy not be offered if registration for the course is too low or if the 
faculty or facilities become unavailable. 

PO 601 ADVANCED POULTRY BREEDING 3 (3-0) orrangc 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; permission of instructor 

♦I"*?^-?! '^*'^°'' ^"^^'^^a'' °"d feather voriotions. Linkage ond chromosome mopping of the 

inThe fowT^ contemporory ideas concerning breeding for meat ond egg production 

Mr. Glozenei 

PO 602 ADVANCED POULTRY NUTRITION 3 (0-6) orrong. 

Prerequisites: Graduate stonding, permission of instructor 

Students taking this course will conduct o reseorch problem in poultry nutrition This 
ex^nm.nT^ t'/?''° r^ *^^ designing ond corrying out of microbiologicol ond ' chick 
b^o^^ni^.H »f ^^"'^^"^^ ^'" obtain proctice in correlot.ng results obtomed in micro- 
Dioiogical ond chick assays. 

Mr. Hill 

PO 603 ADVANCED POULTRY HEMATOLOGY 3 (0-6) orronoe 

Prerequisites: Graduate stonding; permission of instructor 

Study of the hemotopoietic system and blood formotion in the chicken. The erythro- 
cyte the leucocyte, the thrombocyte, the bonemorrow cells ond their respective systems 
lecnnics of blood and morrow examination. Quantitative ond qualitative voriotions in 
me cells ond their constitutents. Mechomsms producing such voriotions, couses ond 



Mr. Cook 



267 



PSYCHOLOGY 



PO 604 ADVANCED POULTRY DISEASES 3 (0-6) arrange 

Prerequisites: ZO 452, 545 

Graduate standing; permission of instructor 
Fundomentals of general pathology. Special pathology of infectious and nutritional 
diseases of the fowl. Study and interpretations of chonges in the macroscopic and 
microscopic structures of the diseased tissues and organs of the fowl occurring undei 
field and experimental conditions. The role of hematology, immunology and endocrinolog> 
in the diagnosis and prevention of poultry diseases. 

Staff 

PO 611 POULTRY RESEARCH 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Credits: A maximum of six is allowed toward a Master's degree. 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Appraisal of present research, critical study of some particular problem involving original 

investigation. Problems in poultry breeding, nutrition, disease, endocrinology, hematologv 

or microbiology. 

Staff 

PO 612 RESEARCH SEMINAR 1 d-O) f & s 

Credits: A maximum of two credits is allowed toward a Master's degree. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Discussion of current topics and problems to research in Poultry Science. 

Staff 

PO 613 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN POULTRY SCIENCE 1-6 (arrange) f s 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the instructor 

Specific problems of study are assigned in various phases of poultry science. 

Staff 

PSYCHOLOGY __ — _ — — — — — — — 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 200 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the general characteristics and development of human behavior, emphasiz- 
ina the problems of motivation, emotion, learning, and thinking. 

Staff 

PSY 201 ELEMENTARY EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Introduction to experimental psychology. Two lectures and one laboratory period per 

week. 

Mr. Barkley 

PSY 302 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY AND ADJUSTMENT 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

A study of the factors involved in the development of the normal personality, empha- 
sizing the principal factors controlling human behavior ond their relationship to adjust- 
ment mechanisms. 

Messrs. Caffey, Corter 

PSY 304 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) t 

PSY 200 recommended as an introductory course. 

Applications of psychology to education; problems of learning, motivation, interests; 
the measurement of educational efficiency; mental hygiene. 

Messrs. Johnson, Barkley 

PSY 307 GENERAL APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

A study of the application of principles of psychology in medicine, law, advertising, 
selling, vocational guidonce, the arts, and athletics. 

Messrs. Barkley, Caffey 

PSY 337 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY i 3 (3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern industry; methods 
of work, monotony, fatigue, accidents, illumination ond morale of workers. 

Messrs. Milton, Solem 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 438 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern industry; selec- 
tion, placement, and training of workers. 

Mr. Solem 

268 



PSYCHOLOGY 



PSY 441 HUMAN FACTORS IN EQUIPMENT DESIGN 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Hurnan factois in the desiqn of machines and other equipment. Sensinq, computing, 
and controlling as human functions which have been extended to machines. Human 
characteristics which offset equipment design. A "systems analysis" approach to man- 
machine problems, in which man and machine are considered os elements in a larger 
unit, performance of which Is considered as a whole. 

Mr. Kelley 

PSY 464 VISUAL PERCEPTION FOR DESIGNERS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The nature of the seeing process and its relotion to architecture, Industrial arts, and 
to the industrial, engineering, and textile design fields. Topics include the physical 
basis of sight, perception of color ond form, vision ond allumination, psychological 
factors in visual desiqn, and a unit of training planned to improve the student's ability 
to perceive visuol form. 

Mr. Kelley 

PSY 47S CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 3(3-0) 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or 304 

Course offered during Summer session only 
The development of the individual child of the elementary school oge will be the 
inclusive subject of study in this course. Emphasis will be placed upon the intellectual, 
social, emotional, and personality development of the child. Physical growth will be 
emphasized as necessary to an understanding of the psychological development of 
the pupil. 

Mr. Barkley 

PSY 476 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE 2 (2-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or 304 

Mental growth, social development, and interests of adolescent boys and girls. 

Messrs. Johnson, Barkley 

PSY 490 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Social applications of psychology: social stimulation, response, and attitudes. 

Mr. Barkley 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 501 INTERMEDIATE APPLIED EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f or s 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology 

Experimental study of problems in the major areas of general and theoretical psy- 
chology which hove special significance in educational, industrial, and applied social 
psychology. Emphasis will be placed upon description of problems, study of methods, 
design of experiments, and procedures for the analysis and presentation of data. Two 
lectures and one laborotory period per week. 

Mr. Barkley 

PSY 504 ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Four hours in Psychology 

Course offered in alternate years 
An advanced course giving a critical appraisal and a consideration of the practical 
applications for vocational education of modern psychological findings. 

Messrs. Johnson, Barkley 

PSY 511 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology 

Course offered in alternate years 
A study of social relationships and their psychological bases; emphosis on those 
aspects of behovior determined by personal interactions; work will involve onolysis of 
representative research studies, and doing individual projects in Industrial and rural areas. 

Mr. Barkley 

PSY 530 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, 302 

A study of the causes, symptomatic behavior, and treotment of the major personality 
disturbances, with emphasis placed on preventive mental hygiene methods. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 535 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Three hours in Psychology 

A study of available tests, with emphasis on proper selection ond use of testing instru- 
ments; also a study of statistical procedures needed in the proper use of tests, in- 
cluding meosures of central tendency, voriobility and correlation. 

Mr. Johnson 

269 



PSYCHOLOGY 



PSY 550 MENTAL HYGIENE IN TEACHING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Four hours in Psychology 

A survey of mental hygiene principles applicable to teachers and pupils; practical 
problems in prevention and treatment of psychological problems in schools; cose 
studies ond research. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 560 TEST CONSTRUCTION 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology 

Course offered in alternate years 
Anolyzes the steps necessary for the development of tests, including job analysis, test 
development of different types of items, item analysis, establishment of norms ond 
determination of reliability. Emphasis placed on construction of mechanical tests with 
application to industry. Students will be given opportunity for construction of tests. 

PSY 561 TES CONSTRUCTION 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequissite: PSY 560 

Course offered in alternate years 
Emphasis placed on criterion analysis; rating scale methods, validation procedures. 
Attention will be directed to the validation of tests constructed in Psychology 560. 

PSY 565 INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT PSYCHOLOGY 3(3-0) f or s 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology 

This course is designed for management personnel in industry and graduate students 
in psychology who wish to familiorize themselves with industrial problems. Emphasis 
will be placed on principles and methods for obtaining better utilization of employee re- 
sources of ideas, attitudes and motivations. 

Mr. Solem 

PSY 570 INTELLIGENCE: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT I 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisites: PSY 200 and three additional hours in Psychology 

An introduction to individual intelligence testing, theoretical background of intelli- 
gence testing, clinical introduction to intelligence testing, case studies and research. 

PSY 571 INTELLIGENCE: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT II 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 570 

A procticum in individual adult intelligence testing with emphasis on the Wechsler- 
Bellevue, other performance tests of intelligence, report writnig, and cose studies. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 572 INTELLIGENCE: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT III 3 (3-0) 

Prerequisite: PSY 570 

Course offered during Summer session only 
A procticum in individual intelligence testing of infants, children and adults with 
emphasis on the Stanford-Binet, other tests, report writing, case studies, and con- 
sultation witn teachers. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 576 ADVANCED ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: PSY 476 

An advanced course in psychology of adolescence in which the student considers the 
original works of leaders in this field, thus laying the foundation for a critical oppre- 
ciotion of the new studies that are consfantly appearing. 

Mr. Johnson 

PSY 578 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Four hours in Psychology 

Nature, extent, and practical implications of individual differences and individual 

variation. 

Mr. Berkley 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PSY 604 APPLIED EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (2-3) f or s 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology 

Experimental analysis of problems of sensation, perception, learning, thinking, emotions, 
fatigue, and neuro-muscuiar reactions. Emphasis upon methods of experimental control, 
dsign of experimental opparatus, and accuracy of reports as these are related to 
loborotory investfqations in the fields of applied psychology. 

Mr. Berkley 

PSY 607 ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY I 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology 

Discussion, anolysis and evoluotion of psychological problems in industry; troining, 
selection and placement of the worker. Emphasis on current research and study of 
psychological programs operating in different Industries. 

Messrs. McGehee, Solem 

270 



RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

PSY 608 ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY II 3 (3 Ot « 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology ' 

oMftV.H«"'*„^"°'^"' °''J^ cvoluQtion of psychologicol problems m industry; morale, 
onrf^^MH t,/'^'' 'h°i""^^'^*'' ""'^ n^ododiusted workers. Emphosis on current research 
ond study of psychological programs operating in different industries. 

Messrs. McGehee, Solem 

PSY 609 PSYCHOLOGICAL CLINIC PRACTICUM Moximum 3 hours f s 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology i^oKimum j nours t $ 

nI'v"rhnL<l?i^'.\'^*^°/'°D *",. interviewing, counseling, psychotehrapy and administration of 
psychological tests. Practicum to be concerned with college students, adults and children. 

Mr. Corter 

PSY 610 APPLIED IMPLICATIONS OF THEORIES OF LEARNING 3(3-0) . 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology •*(■»«; 

Course offered in alternate years 

A study of theories of learning with emphasis upon opplications of the principles of 
learning in industrial and school situations. k >^ v^ 

Messrs. Berkley, Johnson 

PSY 612 SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 (3 0) « 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology 

Scientific articles, analysis of experimental designs in industrial psychology and study 

of special problems of interest to graduate students in Industrial Psychology 

Staff 

PSY 613 RESEARCH IN PSYCHOLOGY Credits by orrongemcnt 

Prerequisite: Eight hours in Psychology angemenr 

Individual or group research problems; a maximum of six credits is allowed toward 
the Master s degree. 

Staff 

— — — — — — — — — — RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES* 

RS 204 NORTH CAROLINA RURAL LIFE 2 (2 0) » s 

Introduction to the specific patterns of rural living in North Carolina; structure and 
function of the groups in which North Carolina rural people participate; major social 
institutions and their related problems; and, organized efforts to improve community 
life in the state. 

Staff 

RS 301 SOCIOLOGY OF RURAL LIFE 3 (3.0) f c 

Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman year 

A systematic sociologicol analysis of the characteristics, institutions and problems of rural 
lire. Hart I is o brief description of the basic concepts, the theoretical framework and 
the method of analysis of institutions and problems. Port II consists of systematic 
onoiyses of the ma|or social institutions and their respective problems. Part III portroys 
The role of the community as an area of institutional functioning and societal integrotion. 

Staff 

RS 321 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL RESEARCH 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 •» *•» "^ ' s 

Designed to give the student a bosic understanding of the methods of sociollgical re- 
search. Reviews the scientific method and its application to the design of social re- 
search including the collection, analysis, and interpretation of social dota. Appropriate 
woys Of presenting the findings and of moking the greatest use of the data are presented 
l-ntical and objective thinking are stressed throughout the course. 

Messrs. Lowery and Mayo 

RS 322 INTRODUCTION TO RURAL SOCIAL WORK 3 (3.0) , 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

Constructed to ocquoint the preprofessionol student with the subiecf matter of sociol 
work as well as its related professional fields. Attention is given to three major oreos- 
D Kr°'* ^°'^ "? ^°''°"* settings; (2) group work, and (3) community organization' 
KuDiic ond private agencies which employ persons trained in social work are studied. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 441 RURAL SOCIAL PATHOLOGY 3 (3 0) f 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission ot the instructor 

;^.»!,h'^r»°' "'°'°' ^5'°' P^blems in modern society: physicol and mental health, family 
mstobility, cr.r^e and penology, and minority group problems A framework for analysis 
?or prevSn^ ^"^ '* Presented and stressed throughout including o positive opprooch 

Mr. Moyo 

271 



RURAL SOCIOLOGY 



RS 442 RURAL SOCIAL STRUCTURE 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

Social structure is viewed in its two major dimensions: (1) vertically through the con- 
cepts of social stratification; and (2) horizontolly as a set of basic social institutions 
interacting by means of a system of concrete social organizations. Particular attention 
is given to the place of the rural segment in the total social system. The bases of social 
cohesion which permit diversity within a functioning whole ore examined. 

Mr. Green 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES* 

RS 511 RURAL POPULATION PROBLEMS 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

A study of population growth, rates of change, and distribution. Considerable attention 
is given to the functional roles of population, i. e., age, sex, race, residence, occupation, 
marital status, and educotion. The dynamic aspects of populotion are stressed; fertility, 
mortality, and migration. Population policy is analyzed in relation to national and 
international goals. A world view is stressed throughout. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 512 RURAL FAMILY LIVING 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

Values, patterns, and levels of rural family living. Differentials and factors related 
thereto in the world, the nation, ond North Carolina. Analysis of selected problems, 
programs, policies, and methods of study. 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 513 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: RS 301 or permission of the instructor 

Community organization is viewed as a process of bringing about desirable changes in 
community life. Community needs and resources available to meet these needs are 
studied. Democratic processes in community action and principles of community or- 
ganization are stressed along with techniques and procedures. The roles of leaders, 
both lay and professional, in community development are analyzed. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 523 LAND TENURE SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

A systematic sociological analysis of the major agriculturol lond tenure systems of the 
world with major emphasis on the problems of family farm ownership and tenancy in 
the United States. 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 534 (Some as HI 534) FARMERS' MOVEMENTS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United States and Canada 
principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Populist 
revolt, the Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, the Equity societies, the Non-partisan 
League, cooperative marketing, government programs, and present problems. 

Mr. Noblin 

RS 541 SOCIAL AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Study of social agencies and programs and their implementation through specific or- 
ganizations in dynamic relation with the people whom they serve. Consideration is 
given to the relation of these agencies and programs to community structure and 
forces in rural society; coordination of the several types of agencies ond programs; 
professional leadership in the local community; and, problems of stimulating local 
leadership and participation. 

Mr. Mayo 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY* 

RS 611 RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Designed to give the student a mature insight into the nature of scientific research in 
sociology. Assesses the nature and purpose of research designs, the interrelationship of 
theory and research, the use of selected techniques and their relation to research designs, 
ond the use of modern tabulation equipment in resarch. 

Mr. Mayo 



•Additional courses, suitable for rural sociology majors and graduate students, are 
listed below in the offerings of the Department of Sociology and Anthropolgy. Other 
sociology courses especially suitable for advanced students and graduates are offered 
by the Department of Sociology and Anthropology of the University at Chapel HIM. 



272 



RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

RS 621 RURAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY ,/,«>, 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor ' ' 

md.v?dJnl%nd"^h^ nro'l'°^"'7* °c/^^ '"T' PC^^^"°l'»y ond the interrelationship of the 
\2^M'r.^l °^'^ ^^,^ ''"°* society. Studies the social psychological foctors related to rural 
leadership, morale, social orgonization, and social change, and examines The at°,tudTs 
ond opinions of rural people on current locol and nationol issues. attitude. 

Mr. Lowry 

RS 631 POPULATION ANALYSIS , ,, „, 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor * ' * 

^hnro°.^L°V''""*'i'"^', °"°ly^'"9, ond presenting data on human populations- distribution 
choracterist.es, noturol increase, migration, and trends in relation to resources 

Mr. Homilton 

RS 632 RURAL FAMILY 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor ' 

foT^fnml'nn^'l'"'^ °" l^^ development of an adequate sociological frame of reference 
of thP nmi7w ''k"' °" discovering both the uniquely-cultural ond common-human aspecti 
of the family by means of cross-cultural comparisons; on historical explanations for 
voriab.lity in American fomilies with especiol concern for the rum fnmMv nnH Z 
onalyzmg patterns of family stability and effectiveness- 

Mr. Green 

RS 633 THE RURAL COMMUNITY , ,, „> 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor ' 

ir/thI,H'°J./°"'T'""^^ " "'^'^^'^ '" sociological perspective as a functioning entity A 
TheunlaulZTl'Ti '^P^^^^^f^ and applied to eight "dimensions," with ^emphasis on 
Se effect of chonnpTn^^n'"''''"^/° '^^ ^^''^^'^ ^'""^ measuring each dimension. Finally 
trie effect of change on community integration and development is analyzed. 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 641 STATISTICS IN SOCIOLOGY , ,, nw 

Prerequisite: ST 513 ■* '^""' * 

lDnr™^«°"°"H°/ ^*°*:^^'"' "methods in sociological research. Emphasis on selecting 
pr^olTe^r^s^'^nd^^rorm's 'Cfrto"'^' ""^ ^^^'"'^"^^ ^°^ ^^^ '"^^ ^-^-"^'v er^counteVe^ 

Mr. Hamilton 

RS 642 RESEARCH IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY r,^A,*. k„ 

Prerequisit.^Permiss,on of chairmen of^^raduate study comm,tt'e;''"*,M''a''x,rm"'oT^s?: 

gSSl comr^rttee''°" °' '""°'''' ''"'' P^-P-<^»i°" of manuscript under supervision of 

Staff 

RS 652 COMPARATIVE RURAL SOCIETIES m a\ f 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor ^ ' 

SrTh°o'nd' SoC^^ Amprirn"'"^ '°"f"" 2'°""^ '^^ ^°^'d ^'^^ particular reference to 
MnuYnt^on rnr^r!^ I , ^^^.^'P' ^""P^^"'" '^ ^'^^n to Cultural and physical setting 

population comporison, levels of living, relotionship of the people to the lond structure 
and function of the major institutions, and forces making for change. structure 

Mr. Mayo 

RS 653 THEORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY 3(3-0) , 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor ^«v,iwi.wv.i 3 (3-0) s 

fo^r''o'll''nrnH,°J! "'°^*^'^ °"^ doctorol condidotes in Rurol Sociology and is recommended 

Mr. Green 

staff 



273 



SOCIOLOGY 



SOCIAL STUDIES 



SS 301, 302 CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: For engineering students ENG 205, HI 205, EC 205; for others, permission 

of the Department 
An examination of the major concepts, methods and values that characterize modern 
thought in the fields of physical science, the humanities and the social sciences. The 
course utilizes the student's previous training, plus materials from the history and 
philosophy of science and the history of technology to demonstrate the essential inter- 
relotedness of scientific, social, and aesthetic activity. 

SS 491, 492 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisites: For engineering students, SS 301, 302; for others, permission of the 

Department 
This course deals with concrete current problems as they arise from day to day in the 
world of public affairs. These problems ore studied and discussed in the context of o 
search for a more realistic definition of the limits of freedom and authority. Text 
materials are books, magazines and newspapers. 

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY ______ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

SOC 101, 102 PEOPLES OF THE WORLD 2(2-0) f s 

This course seeks to develop insights of wide applicability concerning human relation- 
ships and the adjustment of man to his geographical, social, and cultural environments. 
The course is designed to demonstrate interrelationships among diverse factors affecting 
human behovior in all societies. The first semester deals largely with cultures of the 
Western world; the second semester, with cultures of the East. Each semester is 
Independent. 

SOC 111, 112 THE AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE 2(2-0) f s 

Designed to introduce foreign students to the culture of the United States. Students 
ore helped to develop an understanding of the basic values and traditions of American 
society and an insight into the problems that confront it in the world today. Each 
semester is independent. 

SOC 202 MAN AND SOCIETY (GENERAL SOCIOLOGY) 3 (3-0) f s 

Introduction to the scientific study of man's behavior in relation to other men, the 
general laws affecting the organization of such relationships, and the effects of social 
life on human personality and behavior. 

SOC 251, 252 GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY 2(2-0) f s 

In the first semester, a study of the biological development of man as a species; 
analysis of the formation and spread of races; introduction to archaeology as a study 
of the material remains of ancient man and his activities. In the second semester, an 
analysis of various living societies and their cultures in terms of social adjustment to 
recurrent needs. Each semester is independent. 

SOC 301 HUMAN BEHAVIOR 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the effects of social interaction upon individual behavior and personality; 

collective attitudes and behavior as products of group experience; analysis of fashions 
and fads, crowds, mobs, public, social movements. 

SOC 302 PUBLIC RELATIONS AND MODERN SOCIETY 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the social and community setting of public relations, followed by o more 
intense analysis of the development and composition of social groups and the processes 
involved in group orgonizotion. General characteristics and techniques of leadership in 
the field of public relations are analyzed and tested in the classroom. The student will 
study the significance and function of mass communication media and the expansion of 
the social functions of technical specialists and executives. The course concludes with a 
consideration of the role of public relations in regional and international affairs. 

SOC 303 CURRENT SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3 (3-0) f s 

Study of the social and cultural aspects of specific problems such as crime, divorce, 
roe conflict, illness, poverty, housing, recreation, and personality adjustment to demon- 
strote the basic integration of society ond community life. 

SOC 304 CONTEMPORARY FAMILY LIFE 3 (3-0) f s 

Basic interactions involved in courtship, marriage, and family life; onalysis of the 
influence of family life upon economic, social, political, and religious activities; cultural 
end technological changes affecting the family; analysis of family structure and func- 
tions. 



274 



SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 305 RACE RELATIONS 3 (3-0) f s 

Analysis of race relationships both in the United States and throughout the world with 
particular emphasis on factors producing the changes taking place at the present time. 

SOC 306 DELINQUENCY AND CRIME 3 (3-0) f s 

Couscs and conditions loading to delinquency; delinquency os o forerunner of crime; 
characteristics of the offender; methods of prevention and treatment of crime. 

SOC 401 HUMAN RELATIONS IN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY 3 (3-0) f s 

Selected societies about the world contrasted with American society to demonstrate 
correlation between technology and general behavior patterns, both within industry ond 
in the total social order; analysis of patterns of adjustment by the individual to the 
organizational framework in terms of social status, social roles, work norms, and 
attitudes; social significance of mojor characteristics of contemporary industry; inter- 
relationship between industry and social change; contribution of industry to social 
progress. 

SOC 402 CITY LIFE 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of the factors behind the organic growth of cities; the relationship between the 
physical design of cities and their social organization; detailed onalysis of new develop- 
ments in the serving of human needs; comparison of socio-psychological aspects of life 
in an urban society with those of predominantly agricultural societies; increasing inte- 
gration of urban and rural living; study of demand for city and regional planning and 
use of administrative personnel with both technical and social backgrounds created by 
changing character of urban life. 

SOC 411 COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS 3(3-0) f s 

A survey of the institutions, organizations, and agencies found in modern communities; 
social problems and conditions with which they deal; their interrelationship and the 
trend toward over-all planning. 

SOC 412 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK 3(3-0) f s 

A course designed to acquaint students with the various types of public and private 
social work and with remedial and preventive programs in applied sociology, social 
psychiatry, health, public welfare, and recreation. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SOC 501 LEADERSHIP 3 (3-0) f s 

A study of leadership in various fields of American life; analysis of the various factors 
associated with leadership, with particular attention given to recreational, scientific, 
and executive leadership problems. 

SOC 502 SOCIETY, CULTURE, AND PERSONALITY 3 (3-0) f s 

Human personality from its origins In primary groups through its development in 
secondary contacts and its ultimate Integration with social norms. Emphasis is placed 
upon the normal personality and the adjustment of the individual to our society and 
our culture. Dynamics of personality and character structure are analyzed in terms of 
the general culture patterns and social institutions of society. 

SOC 504 EDUCATION IN MODERN SOCIETY 3 (3-0) t s 

Social factors conditioning learning and formal education; the socio! role of the teacher 
in the classroom and in the community; the function of the school in social change 
ond progress. 

SOC 505 THE SOCIOLOGY OF REHABILITATION 3 (3-0) f s 

The course stresses the social and cultural implications of the rehobilitation approach. 
Emphasis is placed upon the social and personol problems of physically and mentally 
handicapped persons. The interrelationships of the major social environments are con- 
sidered at length in this regard. Objectives of the rehabilitation processes are analyzed 
in terms of the sociology of work. A major portion of the course is devoted to reha- 
bilitation as a profession, particular attention being given to the diverse roles of 
specialists in this field. 

SOC 510 INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY 3(3-0) f s 

Industrial relations analyzed as group behavior with o complex and dynamic network 
of rights, obligations, and rules; the sociol system os an interdependent part of totol 
community life; background and functioning of industrialization studied os sociol and 
culturol phenomena; analysis of specific problems of industry. 

SOC 515, 516 RESEARCH IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 3 (arrange) f s 

Individual research problems in applied fields of sociology, such os problems of the 
family, population, and social work; rural-urban relations; student success; American 
leadership. 

275 



SOILS —_ — — _____ — ___ 

COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

SOI 200 SOILS 4 (3-3) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or 203. MIG 120 is recommended but not required 

The fundamental properties of soils and their relation to proper soil management. 
Geological information important to an understanding of soils and agriculture is pre- 
sented for a better understanding of the interrelationship which exists between soils and 
management. 

Mr. Folks 

SOI 302 SOILS AND PLANT GROWTH 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: BO 102, PY 211, SOI 200 

An examination of the fundamental chemical, physical, and microbiological charac- 
teristics of soils as reloted to crop production. The chemical and mineralogial composi- 
tion of soils; ion exchange, soil reaction, and the solubilities of plant nutrients; trans- 
formations between organic and inorganic forms of plant nutrients; woter and air rela- 
tions in soils; lecture-demonstrations will be used to illustrate fundamental soil properties 
ond to acquaint students with methods used in the study of soils. 

Mr. Coleman 

SOI 341 SOIL FERTILITY AND FERTILIZERS 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, BO 102 

History of Plant Nutrition and Soil Fertility. Plant nutrition and growth as related to 
crop fertilization. Fertilizer materials, their manufacture, properties and usage. Fertilizer 
practices as related to a sound soil management program. 

Mr. Folks 

SOI 352 SOIL CLASSIFICATION 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: SOI 200 

The origin, characteristics, classification, and use-suitability of soils of North Carolina 
and the Southeastern United States; field trips. 

Mr. Lee 

SOI 461 SOIL CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: SOI 200 

The history and status of erosion and fertility conditions; the economic and social aspects 
of soil conservation; the effects of climatic factors, vegetation (forests, sod crops, cover 
crops and rotations), soil properties, and other management practices on soil conservation 
and fertility maintenance. 

Mr. Lutz 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SOI 511 SOIL PHYSICS 4(3-3) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, PY 202 

Physical constitution ond analyses; soil structure, soil water, soil air, and soil tempera- 
ture in relation to plant growth. 

Mr. Lutz 

SOI 521 SOIL CHEMISTRY 4 (4-0) f 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, CH 212, and CH 532 

Chemical composition and properties of soil, particularly concerning clay mineralogy, 
chemical processes of weathering, soil solution reaction, chemical properties of lays and 
ionic exchanges in soils. 

Mr. McAuliffe 

SOI 522 METHODS OF SOIL CHEMISTRY 4 (2-6) s 

Prerequisites: SOI 341, CH 212 

Procedures for the separation and identification of soil constituents. Methods and 
techniques for the study of the chemistry of soils. Particular emphasis is placed on 
the demonstrotion of fundamental soil chemical properties and on the use of soil 
analyses in assessing soil fertility. 

Mr. Coleman 

SOI 532 SOIL MICROBIOLOGY 4 (3-3)s 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, BO 412, 421 

The more important microbiological processes that occur in soils; decomposition of 
organic materials, ammonification, nitrification and nitrogen fixation. 

Staff 

276 



STATISTICS 



SOI 570 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, CH 212. Students admitted only with consent of instructors 

Special problems in vorious phases of Soils. Problems may be selected or will be 

assianed. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. 

Staff 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY* 

SOI 611 ADVANCED SOIL PHYSICS*** 4(3-3-) s 

Prerequisites: SOI 511, MA 401, PY 202 

An introduction into the usoge of theoretical method in soil physics. Lectures, literature, 
and discussions centered around problems in the movement of soil water, soil gases and 
heat flow through soils. 

Mr. Von Bavel 

SOi 621 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisites: SOI 521, 522. Registration by permission of instructor 

Detailed examination of current concepts in o selected field of soil chemistry, such as 
cloy mineralogy, cation exchange or soil organic matter. Offered for smoll groups of 
graduate students particularly interested in a specific field of soil chemistry, and to be 
tauqht by the members of the staff who are most conversant with that particular field. 

Staff 

SOI 642 ADVANCED SOIL FERTILITY** 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisites: SOI 511, 521, 522 

Soil conditions affecting crop growth; the chemistry of soil and plant interrelationships; 
theoretical and applied aspects of fertilizer usage in relation to plant nutrition. 

Mr Fitts 

SOI 651 SOIL MORPHOLOGY, GENESIS, AND CLASSIFICATION 4 (3-3) s 

Prerequisites: SOI 200, CH 212, MIG 120 

Morphology: Descriptive aspects of soil profiles including field work, nomenclature, and 
sampling of representative Great Soil Groups typical of North Carolina. Genesis: A 
critical evaluation of the factors of soil formation and the processes responsible for 
profile differentiation in Greet Soil Groups of the V^orld. Classificotion: The historical 
development of soil classification through present day concepts, with a critical evaluation 
of each with respect to the natural system of classification. 

Mr. McColeb 

SOI 680 SEMINAR 1 d-O) * » 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of interest to 

agronomists reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, but any number 

toward the Doctorate. 

Stoff 

SOI 690 RESEARCH Credits by arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Soils 

A moximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's degree but any number toward 

the Doctorate. 

Staff 



____ — _ — __ — _ —STATISTICS 

SEE EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 



Students are expected to consult the instructor before registration. 
Offered in 1956-57 and in alternate years. 
Offered in 1955-56 and in alternate yeors. 



277 



TEXTILES 



SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

TX 101 YARN PRINCIPLES 2(1-2) f s 

Required of freshmen in all Textile curriculo 

This course is on introduction to textile manufacturing. It covers briefly the processes 
common to yarn manufacturing, and in a broader sense the types of mechanisms com- 
mon to all textile machines, calculations involving speeds, productions, and twists that 
are associated with these mechanisms, and the theory and application of the cotton 
numbering system. The lecture and recitation work are supplemented by laboratory 
application, which covers in detail the work of the classroom. 
One 1 -hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Staff 

TX 201 YARN MANUFACTURE II 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 101 

Required of sophomores in Textiles 
Combined lecture and laboratory instruction on the functions involved in processing 
textile fibers on the cotton system from the raw product to the spun yarn. Particular 
emphasis is given to a study of the functions of opening, cleaning, doubling, evening, and 
drafting. 
Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Parker, Smith 

TX 301 YARN MANUFACTURE III 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 201 

Required of juniors in Textiles 
A continuation of Yarn Manufacture II on the functions of twisting and packaging of 
cotton rovings and yarns, with laboratory work supplementing lecture instruction. Also 
included is a study of textile machines as producing units — such machines as combers, 
roving frames, twisters, and the like. 
Three 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Smith 

TX 321 TEXTILE TESTING I 3(1-4) f 

Required of juniors in Textile Chemistry 

Physical testing and evaluation of yarns and fabrics with emphasis on techniques, instru- 
ments and methods for quality measurements of finished products; also collection and 
interpretation of data and reporting of results. 
One 1-hour lecture and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Mr. Hamby 

TX 323 TEXTILE TESTING 11 3(1-4) f s 

Required of juniors in Textiles 

Quality control methods for textile processing, with emphasis on the measurement by 

laboratory instruments and techniques, and including a study of the mechanical and 

natural influences involved. 

One 1-hour lecture and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby, Stuckey 

TX 401 YARN MANUFACTURE IV 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 301 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing and General Textiles Options. 

Elective for others 
Refinements on yarn production, such as detailed study of carding; production levels; 
comber types, settings, and quality aspects; modern drafting assemblies. Review of all 
yarn mill calculations. Production of novelty yarn, and special yarns such as voile, crepe. 
Manufacturing of thread yarn. Special techniques and problems; types of winders; large 
package production, types of travelers and rings; operation schedules. Lab project in 
small groups. (Piece rates.) 
Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Parker 

TX 402 MILL TECHNOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisite: TX 301 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing and Synthetics Options 

Elective for others 
Mill Layout: layout of textile mill of cotton or synthetics type. Types of machines, 
numbers, ond balance of equipment. Floor layout plans and process flow, speeds, produc- 
tions, help layout, power and investment. 
Three 1 -hour lectures per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Parker 



278 



TEXTILES 



TX 411 WOOL MANUFACTURE I 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 301 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing and General Textiles Options 

Elective for others 
Raw materials used in wool and worsted trades; classification, structure, and characteris- 
tics of fibers, grading, sorting and mixing. Reclaimed wool and secondary raw materials. 
Lectures are supplemented by laboratory applications 
Two 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Pardue 
TX 424 DEVELOPMENT PROJECT 2 (0-4) s 

Prerequisite: TX 323 

Required of seniors in Quality Control Option 
Studies are conducted independently on assigned problems, and seminars are held on 
applications and administration of testing, quality control and development. Studies and 
discussion of budgeting and evaluation of priority and progress. Current technical develop- 
ments are discussed. Results of project to be written in form of a technical report from 
a control and development laboratory. 
One 4-hour laboratory period per week. 

Staff 

TX 431 SYNTHETICS I 2(2 0) f s 

Prerequisite; TX 481 

Required of seniors in General Textiles, Weaving and Designing, and Yarn 

Manufacturing Options 
A general course including: textile processing of continuous filament synthetic yarns in 
the yarn producing plants; preparation of yarns for weaving and knitting including crepe, 
voile and hosiery yarns; the application of synthetic yarns for use as industrial yarns 
and fabrics; also, calculations involving the denier system end production calculations. 
Two I -hour lectures per week. ... 

Messrs. Grover, Hornby 

TX 433 SYNTHETICS II 4(3-2) f 

Prerequisite: TX 481 

Required of seniors in Synthetics Option 
An odvanced study of the physical problems and the relations of physical properties to 
the processing characteristics and end product performances of the synthetic fibers. A 
study of the influence of twist on physical properties of filament yarns; comprehensive 
studies of the processing of sized and unsized filament yarns as encountered in the 
throwing industry and in preparation for knitting and weaving. A study of the industrial 
uses of synthetic fibers and the requirements of such uses. 
Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby 

TX 435 SYNTHETIC FIBER PROCESSING 4(3-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 301 

Required of seniors in Yarn Manufacturing and Synthetic Options 

Elective for others 
Studies of the contributions of individual fibers to the entire blend covering both the 
man-made as well as natural fibers. Processing of man-made fibers into spun yarn and 
fabric, particularly on the cotton system. The processing of man-made fibers by new 
methods, such as by direct spinning and the Pacific Converter. Studies of the modification 
of machines for processing synthetic fibers alone or in blend with other fibers. 
Three 1-hour lectures ana one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby, Parker 

KNITTING TECHNOLOGY 

TX 241 KNITTING I 3 (2-2) ♦ * 

Required of sophomores in Textiles 

Selection and preparation of knitting yarns, knitting mechonisms, structure of selected 

types of spring and latch needle fabrics; operation and adjustment of the bosic types 

of knitting machines. 

Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Lewis, Middleton 

TX 341 HOSIERY MANUFACTURE 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 241 

Required of juniors in Textiles 
A study of advanced types of circulor knitting machines ond the problems involved in 
the manufacture of fine hosiery. Hosiery design and analysis. 
Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Middleton 

279 



TEXTILES 



TX 343 KNITTED FABRIC DESIGN AND ANALYSIS 2(0-4) t 

Prerequisite; TX 341 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option 
Elective for others 
Stitch formation for the more intricate knitted fobrics; control mechanisms for pottern 
work; designing methods; analysis of fobrics for reproduction and costing; color in knit 

goods. 
Two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Mr. Lewis 

TX 441 FLAT KNITTING 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: TX 341 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option 

Elective for others 
A study of the leading types of flat knitting machines including warp knitting machines, 
design possibilities, and fabric odaotability. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 443 KNITTING MECHANICS 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisite: TX 341 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option 

Elective for others 
Mathematics and mechanics of flat and rib knitting. Interrelation of yarn number, yarn 
diameter, gauge, cut, stitch, length, fobric structure and weight; proportions of yarns in 
multiple-thread work; production problems, etc. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 444 GARMENT MANUFACTURE 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 341 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option 

Elective for others 
A study of circular latch needle and spring needle machines for knit fabric production 
styling, cutting and seaming of the basic garment types for underwear and outerwear; 
standard seam types; high-speed sewing machines. 
Two 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Shinn, Lewis 

TX 445 FULL-FASHIONED HOSIERY MANUFACTURE 2 (2-0) s 

TX 447, f 448 s KNITTING LABORATORY II 2(0-4) 

Prerequisite: TX 341 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option 

Elective for others 
Mechanics of the full-fashioned hosiery machine including procticol training in its ad- 
justment and operation. Attention is given to yarn preparation, knitting, inspection, 
finishing ond packaging hosiery. 

One 4-hour laboratory period per week each semester. Two 1 -hour lectures per week in 
spring semester. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 449 TRICOT KNITTING 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 341 

Required of seniors in Knitting Technology Option 

Elective for others 
A study of basic types of tricot knitting machines with emphasis on mechanisms and 
fabrics. Attention is given to warp preparation methods applicable to the tricot machine, 
the characteristics of yarns made from natural and synthetic fibers as they affect process- 
ing into warp knitted fabrics, machine settings for proper qualities and ratios; economics 
of warp knitting, and end uses. Attention is given to fabric design and analysis. 
Three 1-hour lectures per week 

Mr. Shinn 

FABRIC DEVELOPMENT 

TX 151 FABRIC PRINCIPLES 2(1-2) f s 

Required of freshmen in all Textile curricula 

An introduction to the study of fabric development and construction. The methods of 

preparing yorn for weaving, the weaving of fabrics, and the calculations required to 

produce a fabric ore included. Lectures are supplemented by laborotory exercises in 

operation of the machinery. 

One 1-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Whittier and Staff 

280 



TEXTILES 



TX 251 WEAVING II 3(1-4) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 151 

Required of sophomores In Textiles 
A study of cam loom mechanisms; cams and their construction; timings, settings ond 
operation of plain cam and drop-box looms. 
One 1 -hour lecture and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Messrs. Moser, Berry, Klibbe 

TX 261 FABRIC STRUCTURE 3 (2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 151 

Required of sophomores in Textiles 
A study of the fundamental principles of fabric structure. Speclol emphasis is placed on 
the weave formation, drawing in draft, and cam design of basic fabrics, such as plain 
woven grey goods, twills, sateens and their common derivatives. 
Two 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour loborotory period per week. 

Messrs. Moser, Gaither, Berry 

TX 271 UPHOLSTERY FABRICS 2(2-0) f 

Required of sophomores in Furniture Manufacturing 

A study of the basic principles of fabric structure and identification. A complete 
description of fabrics particularly suited to the furniture trade, including nomenclature, 
economic importance, physical properties and price structure. 

Messrs. Whittier, Gaither 

TX 351 WEAVING III 3(2-?.) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 251 

Required of juniors in Textiles 
Methods of drawing-in and starting up dobby warps: setting of harness shafts; selection 
of springs or spring jacks. Construction and setting of drop-box motions, single and 
double index dobbies and automatic mechanisms; methods of fixing looms. 
Preparation of warps for weaving fabrics on dobby looms; starting up warps in looms; 
pattern choin building; operation of dobby looms. 
Two 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Porter, Moser, Gaither, Berry 

TX 361 DOBBY DESIGN AND ANALYSIS I 3(1-4) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 261 

Required of juniors in Textiles 
A study of basic dobby weaves and their drawing in drafts, chain and reed plans. This 
course includes the development of such weaves as ribs, spot designs, fancy twills, 
honeycombs, piques, warp and filling back weaves and their application to styled fabrics. 
Instruction in fabric analysis techniqpes and use of laboratory instruments for determina- 
tion of fabric construction details. The development of fabric specifications and design 
is stressed. 
One 1-hour lecture and two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Messrs. Moser, Gaither, Porter 

TX 373 FABRIC TECHNOLOGY 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 261 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing Textile Options 

Elective for others 
Calculations for construction and factors which affect it; overage yarn count; cloth 
constant, percentages of warp, filling and sizing; ascertaining the counts of warp and 
filling required for o given weight and construction; checking the correctness of any 
given yorn combination; obtaining spun counts from sized yarns; calculating yarn to be 
soun for a specific order; allocation of looms; loom speeds and production. 
Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Staff 

TV 451 WEAVING LABORATORY IV 1 (0-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 351 

Required of seniors in General Textiles and Weaving and Designing Options 

Elective for others 
Operotion ond fixing of dobby, pick ond pick and jocquord looms; preparation of warps 
to weave royon, wool ond fine cotton fabrics; building of box, dobby ond multiplier 
choins. 
One 2-hour loborotory period per week. 

Messrs. Moser, Berry 

TX 452 WEAVING LABORATORY V 2(0-4) s 

Prerequisite: TX 451 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing Option 

Elective for others 
Continuation of TX 451 with speciol emphasis upon moking original designs for dobby 
fabrics, preporing the warps and weaving the fobrics. 
Two 2-hour loborotory periods per week. 

Messrs. Moser, Berry 

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TEXTILES 

TX 461 DOBBY DESIGN AND ANALYSIS II 3 (2-2) f 

Prerequisites: TX 361 

Required of seniors in General Textiles ond Weaving and Designing Options 

Elective for others 
A detailed study of the design and weave of complicated fabrics such os double cloth, 
corduroy, velveteen, crepe and intricate figured designs, matellasse, velvet and frieze. 
Analyzing samples of cotton, wool, worsted, linen rayon and silk fabrics for size of 
yarns ends and picks per inch, weight of warp and filling, so as to accurately reproduce 
sample analyzed; obtaining design, drawing in draft, chain, and reed plan for fancy 
fabrics, such as stripes, checks, extra warp and extra filling figures, leno fabrics, jacquard 
fabrics, droperies. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Berry 

TX 471 COLOR IN WOVEN DESIGN 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 361 

Elective 
Pigment and light theories of color; contrast and harmony of colors; factors which 
influence quality, style and color; methods of applying weaves and color to fabrics for 
wearing apparel and home decorations. 
Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Staff 

TX 473 FABRIC CHARACTERISTICS 2(1-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TX 361 

Elective 
A study of the identification, classification and utilization of woven fabrics and how 
these are affected by various properties such as geometry, weave, and finish. Actual 
inspection of a wide range of fabrics with emphasis on a study of defects and their 
influence on quality will be included in the laboratory work. 
One 1-hour lecture ond one 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Mr. Whittier 

TX 474 PILE FABRICS 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 451 

Elective 
A study of single shuttle and double shuttle pile fabric such as terry cloth, codruroy, 
plush and carpet fabrics. This will include the fabric structure, yarn preparation, weaving 
and finishing aspects of pile fabrics woven on cam, dobby and jacquard looms. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Berry 

TX 476 SYNTHETICS III 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisites: TX 351, 361 

Required of seniors in Synthetics Option 
Advanced study of the development and construction of fabrics made with synthetic 
yarns. The course includes lectures on the special problems encountered in the design, 
warp and filling preparation and weaving of fabrics made with filament yarns. The 
methods used by industry to overcome these difficulties are demonstrated in the labor- 
otory sessions. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Moser 

TEXTILE CHEMISTRY- — — — _________ 

TC 201 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY I 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite: CH 103 

Required of sophomores in Textiles 
A comprehensive course designed to familiarize the student with the chemical properties 
of all natural and synthetic fibers, and with their expected behavior under the various 
conditions to which they may be exposed. A brief survey of those parts of organic 
chemistry applicable to textile moterials is included. 
Two 1-hour lectures per week, 

Mr. Rutherford 

TC 301, 302 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY II 3(2-2) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 201 

Required of seniors In Textiles 
A comprehensive course covering: a brief outline of the methods of scouring, bleaching, 
dyeing, printing, and finishing textile materials; a study of the machinery involved in 
the wet handling of textiles. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour loborotory period per week. 

Mr. Hayes 

282 



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TC 303, 304 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY III 4(2-4i f s 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment m CH 421, 422 

Required of juniors in Textile Chemistry 
A study of the action of chemicals on fibers; methods ond chemistry of scouring, bleach- 
ing, end mercerization; preparation of typical dyestuffs and their application to fibers. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour loborotory period per week. 

Mr. Hayes 

TC 403, 404 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY IV 4 (2-4) f s 

Prerequisite; TC 304 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 
A continuation of TC 303 and 304 with special emphasis on modern dyeing methods. 
Laboratory exercises and use of pilot and mill-scale equipment of mony types in dyeing 
all important fibers and fiber mixtures. Selected topics of impyortonce to the textile 
chemist with special attention to current technological advances in the field. Visits to 
mills selected to cover a wide variety of processing techniques. 
Two 1-hour lecture sand one 4-hour latxsratory per week. 

Mr. Campbell 

TC 411 TEXTILE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS I 3(1-4) orrange 

Prerequisite; CH 21 1 

Elective for students in Textile Chemistry 
Anolysis ond evaluotion of textile chemicals and related moteriols such as water, soop, 
wetting agents, synthetic detergents, bleaching and stripping agents, and finishing 
comp>ounds. Identification and quantitative determination of materiols employed in 
several categories of textile wet processing such as sizes, surface-active agents, dyestuffs 
ond finishes. 
Two 2-hour laboratories per week. 

Messrs. Rutherford, Compbell 

TC 412 TEXTILE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS II 3(1-4) s 

Prerequisites; CH 21 1 and TC 304 

Elective for students in Textile Chemistry 
Anolysis of textile moteriols involving speciolized instruments and techniques such as 
spectrophotometry, pH measurements, electrometric titrotion, viscometry, etc. 
Two 2-hour loborotories per week. 
One 1 -hour lecture ana two 2-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Messrs. Rutherford, Campbell 

TC 421 FABRIC FINISHING I 2(2-0) f s 

Prerequisite; TC 20! 

Required of seniors in Synthetics Option. Elective for others, except students in 

Textile Chemistry 
A general course in fabric finishing designed for students not majoring in Textile 
Chemistry. Emphasis placed on finishes used on garment-type fabrics, including stabiliza- 
tion finishes, water repellency, crease resistance, moth and mildew proofing, fire-proofing, 
etc. Emphasis on chemistry of finishes voried to fit requirements of students. 
Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Hoyes 

TC 423 FABRIC FINISHING II 3(1-4) f 

Prerequisite; TC 304 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 
A study of the compounds used in the finishing of fabrics, and of the methods used in 
loborotory development ond plant application of finishing compounds. Studies of the 
methods of evaluation of finishes ore included in the laboratory work. 
One 1 -hour lecture and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Rutherford 

TC 425 TEXTILE MICROSCOPY 1 (0-2i f s 

Prerequisite; TX 481 

Required of oil Textile and Textile Chemistry students 
Experiments, lectures, ond demonstrations in application of microscopy to textiles. 
Experiments include fiber study by both longitudinal and cross-sectionol section, cotton 
moturity, starch studies, micrometry of fibers, and others. Fundamentals of pororizing, 
phose controsts, and electron microscopes are covered. Demonstrations of euscope, pro- 
tection microscope, photomicrogrophic cameras, ond other devices. 
One 2-hour loborotory period per week. 

Mr. Stuckey 



283 



TEXTILES 

TC 431 TEXTILE PRINTING 3(1-4) s 

Prerequisite: TC 304 

Required of students in Textile Chemistry 
Fundamentals of textile printing with major emphosis on modern roller printing methods; 
design of printing machines, preparation of cloth for printing, formulation and properties 
of printing pastes, application techniques for all important types of dyestuffs, styles of 
printing, and aging and aftertreating procedures. 
One 1-hour lecture and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Campbell 

GENERAL TEXTILE COURSES 

TX 281 FIBER QUALITY 3(3-0) f s 

Required of juniors in Textiles 

History, development, production, ginning and handling of cotton. World crops; marketing 
methods; classification; relation of grade and staple to the value of cotton. Measurement 
of the physical properties of cotton fibers and their relation to spinning quality; relation 
of grade and staple to waste, spinning behavior, and yarn quality. Selection of cotton 
for different types of yarns and fabrics. 

An introduction to synthetic fiber knowledge, including the history, deveolpment, and 
classification of all synthetic fibers. A study of the manufacturing processes of synthetic 
yarns. A description of the chemical and physical properties of the fibers and yarns 
and how these affect the selection of synthetic yarns and fabrics by consumers. 
Three 1 -hour lectures per week. 

TX 284 TEXTILE PROCESSING 4(3-2) s 

Prerequisites: TX 101, 151 

Required of sophomores in Textile Chemistry 
A general textile manufacturing course covering the production of yarns and fabrics. The 
fundamentals of yarn manufacture, including opening, picking, cleaning, carding end 
spinning are covered. Special emphosis is put on creeling, beaming and slashing of 
warps for weaving, and the preparation of warps for knitting. Fundamental principles of 
textile design, weaving and knitting are covered. 
Three 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Woodbury 

TX 483 TEXTILE COST METHODS 2 (2-0) f s 

Prerequisites: TX 301, 361 

Required of seniors in Textiles except those in Management Option 
A survey of cost methods applicable to textile mills with emphasis on calculotions, the 
preparation of cost reports, and their use in cost control. 
Two 1 -hour lectures per week. 

TX 484 MILL ORGANIZATION 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: TX 301, 361 

Required of seniors in Textiles 
Studies of organizations of textile mills from personnel as well as functional viewpoints 
and of the planning and scheduling of manufacturing contracts through opening and 
weaving mills. Analysis of manufacturing organizations based on processes and equip- 
ment. 
Three 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Grover 



COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FIBER AND YARN TECHNOLOGY 

TX 501 YARN TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: TX 401 

Elective 
Lecture ond discussion periods are designee for students who are particularly interested 
in the yorn manufacturing aspects of the textile industry. Subject matter will in- 
clude such various aspects as training methods, safety programs, modern mill design, 
specialized techniques in setting rotes, employee relations, and developments that arise 
from technical meetings. 
Two 1 -hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Grover and Staff 



284 



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TX 521 TESTING AND QUALITY CONTROL 4(2-4) » 

Prerequisite: TX 323 

Required of students in Quality Control Option. Elective for others 
Testing of notural and man-made fibers and of yorns and fabrics, with emphasis on 
advanced testing techniques. Consideration of quality control programs, including "de- 
fect preventive' methods, pin-pointing of troubles, and the relationship between the 
quality control department and operating divisions. Technical report writing, literature 
research, ond study of military specifications and U. S. Government standards as CCC-T- 
191b. Attendance at technical meetings such as the Fiber Society, American Society 
for Testing Materials, American Society for Quality Control is encouraged. 
Two 1 -hour lectures and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Hornby 

TX 522 TEXTILE TESTING III 4(2-4) s 

Prerequisite; TX 521, or graduate standing, with approval of instructor 

Required of students in Quality Control Option, Elective for others 
Mechanics of textile fabrics, with emphasis on the application of engineering criteria 
to laboratory evaluation of natural and man-made fibrous materials, stress-stroin re- 
lationships, modifications due to impact, torsional properties, thermoplastic material 
degradation, permeability to gases and liquids, theory of induced wear with influence 
of obrasion. Influence on fabric properties resulting from blending of fibers, and 
modification of properties by varying fiber distribution. Specialized techniques of con- 
torlling attributes and variables of fabric quality. 
Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour laboratory period per week. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby 

TX 551 WEAVING VI 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: TX 451 

Elective 
Consideration of machine-design factors end operational problems and factors peculiar 
to the manufacture of selected complex fabrics. Unique economic problems of fabric 
production. 
Two 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Whittier and Staff 

TX S61 DOBBY DESIGN AND ANALYSIS III 2(2-0) s 

Prerequisite: TX 461 

Required of seniors in Weaving and Designing Option. Elective for others 
The development of design specifications for selected complex fabrics and a study of 
the geometrical and aesthetic factors influencing their suitability for specific end uses. 
Two 1 -hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Whittier ond Staff 

TX 562 JACQUARD DESIGN AND WEAVING 3(2-2) s 

Prerequisite: TX 361 

Required of seniors in Weoving ond Designing Option. Elective for others 
The opplication of punched card techniques to the design and manufacture of certain 
fabrics having intricate decorative patterns and special surface charateristics. 
Two 1-hour lectures ond one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Berry 
TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

TC 501 SEMINAR IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 2 (arranged) s 

Prerequisite: TC 403 

Elective for Textile Chemistry students 
The course is designed to familiarize the student with the principal sources of textile 
chemical literature and to emphasize the importance of keeping abreast of developments 
in the field of textile chemstry. Particular attention is poid to the fundamentals of 
technicol writing. Reports. 
Lectures orronged. 

Mr. Campbell, Stoff 

TC 511, f 512 s CHEMISTRY OF FIBERS 2(2-0) 

Prerequisite: CH 422 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 
A lecture course emphasizing: the theory of fiber structure; the relationship between 
the chemicol structure and physical properties of natural and synthetic fibers; the noture 
of the chem'cal reactions which produce degradation of fibers; the production of synthetic 
fibers. 
Two I -hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Rutherford 



285 



TEXTILES 



TC 521 TEXTILE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS III -r(arronged) f s 

Prerequisite: TC 421, or permission of instructor 

Elective for all Textile students except those majoring in Textile Chemistry 
The work includes the chemical identification of fibers, the qualitative and quantitative 
anolysis of fiber blends by chemical means, ond the evaluation techniques for dyed 
and finished materials. 

Messrs. Rutherford, Campbell 



TC 525 ADVANCED TEXTILE MICROSCOPY 

Prerequisite: TC 425 

Elective 
Experiments, lectures and demonstrations in more advanced 
microscopy. Detailed studies of structures of fibers covered in 
mented by experiments on lecture topics. Detailed study of all 
and their uses in textiles. Preparation of slides for photography 
graphic equipment. 
Lectures and laboratories arranged 



2 (arranged) f s 



techniques of textile 
lecture series, supple- 
types of microscopes 
Uses of photomicro- 



Mr. Rutherford, Staff 



TC 605 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF DYEING 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisites: CH 422, PY 212, MA 212 or graduate standing 

Dyeing is treated as a physio-chemicol process emphasizing equilibria, kinetics, and 
practical aspects of research into dyeing processes. 

Mr. Cotes 

TC 606 CHEMISTRY OF FIBER-FORMING HIGH POLYMERIC SYSTEMS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: CH 422, PY 212, MA 212 or graduate study 

The course will embody studies of the mechanism and kinetics of polymerization, the 
properties and behavior of high polymer solutions, the mechanical behavior of notural 
and synthetic fibrous material as related to the molecular structures. 

Mr. Cotes 

GENERAL TEXTILE COURSE 

TX 581 INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL 3(2-2) f s 

Required of all seniors in Textiles and Textile Chemistry 

A lecture series with coordinated laboratory exercises designed to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the theory and application of instruments and control apparatus that he 
will find in the modern textile plant. 

The studies cover the measurement and control of temperature, humidity, regain, 
chemical processes, physical finishing processes, time and temperature cycles, yarn 
and cloth tension, speed, and fluid pressure. 
Two 1 -hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week. 

Mr. Asbill 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TX 601, 602 YARN MANUFACTURE 3 f s 

Prerequisite: TX 401 or equivalent 

A study of breaking strength and related properties of cotton yarns mode under 
various atmospheric conditions; comparison of yarns produced from long and short- 
staple cotton with regular and special carding processes; efficiency of various roller 
covering materials at the drawing processes; elimination of roving processes by special 
methods of preparation; comparison of regular and long-draft spinning. 

Messrs. Grover, Hornby 

TX 621 TEXTILE TESTING IV 2 f s 

Prerequisite: TX 522 or equivalent 

Design of textile laboratories, including conditioning equipment and instruments re- 
quired for specific needs; performance of tests and analysis of data on industrial 
problems; specialized physical tests; inter-laboratory tests and analysis; study of A.S.T.M. 
specifications and work on task groups for the A.S.T.M. Society. 

Messrs. Grover, Homby 

TX 631 SYNTHETICS IV 2 s 

Prerequisite: TX 433 or equivalent 

Setting up of on assigned project on problems peculiar to the processing of continuous 
filament yarns, particularly in the initial preparatory stages of processing, and including 
sizing, twisting, winding, and associated problems. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby 



286 



ZOOLOGY 



TX 641, 642 ADVANCED KNITTING SYSTEMS AND MECHANISMS 3 f s 

Prerequisite: TX 441 or equivalent 

A critical study of inventions which have contributed to the development of the 

modern knitting industry; knitting needles and their adaptation for specific uses; means 

for mounting them for individual and en masse operation; construction and functioning 

of cooperating elements inclulding sliders, jacks, sinkers, dividers, pressing elements, 

narrowing and tensioning and draw-off motions, regulating mechanisms, timing and 

control chains ond cams. 

Use will be made of patent literature such as U. S. Patents 2,413,601 ond 2,431,160, 

Bitzer, which represent important developments in the full-fashioned hosiery industry. 

Three 1-hour lectures per week. 

Mr. Shinn 

TX 643, 644 KNITTING RESEARCH 3 f s 

Prerequisites: Graduate stonding ond 8 credits in Knitting 

Problems of specific interest to the Knitting industry will be assigned for study and 
investigation. The use of experimental methods will be emphasized. Attention will 
be oiven to the preparation of reports for publication. 

Staff 

TX 651, 652 FABRIC DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION 3 f s 

Prerequisite: B.S. degree in Textiles (Weaving and Designing Option) or equivalent 
Application of advanced technology to the development and construction of woven 
fobrics. 

Mr. Whittier 

TX 681, 682 TEXTILE RESEARCH 3 f s 

Problems of specific interest to the textile industry will be assigned for study and 
investigation. The use of experimental methods will be emphasized. Attention will be 
given to the preparation of reports for publication. The master's thesis may be based 
upon the data obtained. 

Staff 

TX 683, 684 SEMINAR 1 * s 

Discussion of scientific orticles of interest to textile industry; review and discussion of 
student papers and research problems. 

Staff 

TC 603, 604 TEXTILE CHEMISTRY V 3 f $ 

Prerequisite: TC 404 

Theories of dyeing applicable to the various fiber-dye systems. Modern concepts of 
textile finishing. Special attention to problems introduced by the new synthetic polymer 
fibers in the field of dyeing and finishing. Advanced work in the chemical exomination 
ond evaluation of textile chemical auxiliory materials. 



ZOOLOGY 



COURSES FOR UNDERGRADUATES 



ZO 101 GENERAL ZOOLOGY 3(2-2) f s 

Animals with special reference to the morphology and physiology of vertebrates, including 
intnsive laboratory study of the mammal with lecture and laboratory work closely 
integrated and applied to humon life. 

Staff 

ZO 102 GENERAL ZOOLOGY 3(2-2) f s 

Animals with special reference to economic and ecologicol consideration designed to 
give the student a general understanding of animal life and its importonce in human 
offoirs. 

Staff 

ZO 212 HUMAN ANATOMY 3(2-2) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 101 

A study of human anatomy with major emphasis on the structure and function of the 
muscular, skeletal, circulotory, and nervous systems. Required of majors in recreotion. 

Mr. Evers 

ZO 213 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 3 (2-2) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 101 

An elementary survey of human physiology. The centrol theme is the changes in the 
human body accompanying increosed physical activity. The noture ond mechonisms 
of these changes. 

Mr. Evers 



287 



ZOOLOGY 



ZO 223 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY 4(2-4) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102 

A comparative morphology of vertebrates demonstrating the interrelationships of the 
organ systems of the various groups. 

Mr. Horkema 

ZO 252 ORNITHOLOGY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ZO 1 01 

The biology, natural history, and classification of North American birds, with special 
reference to those of North Carolina and the eastern United States. Field trips for the 
study and identification of local forms. 

Mr. Quay 

ZO 301 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 3 (2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: ZO 10); PY211; CH 101 or 201, and 203 

Physiology of vertebrates with particular reference to mon and the lower animals. 

Mr. Evers 

ZO 312 PRINCIPLES OF GAME MANAGEMENT 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 102; Elective for juniors and seniors not majoring in Wildlife 
This course is intended to provide the student with a basic understanding of the major 
principles of wildlife management. It is designed especially for those individuals who 
anticipate entering the fields of agriculture, forestry, agricultural extension, or rural 
ond industriol recreation. 

Mr. Borkalow 

ZO 315 ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102 

This course is designed to give students a knowledge and appreciation of the para- 
sitic hobit. The biology, life history, pathology, and control of the common parasites 
of domestic onimals and poultry ore covered. 

Mr. Harkema 

ZO 321 WILDLIFE AND NATURAL RESOURCE CONSERVATION 3(3-0) s 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in any school 

The importance of natural resources to man and the part they ploy in national and 
international affairs; the principles which underlie their conservation and the im- 
pact of over-exploitation on primitive and civilized societies. Emphasis is placed on 
the renewable resources, particularly wildlife. 

Mr. Barkalow 

ZO 332 FUR RESOURCES 3(1-4) f 

Prerequisite; ZO 101 

Life history and management of the important fur-bearing animals; skinning, drying, 
marketing pelts, fur farming. 

Mr. Barkalow 

ZO 452* ANIMAL MICROTECHNIQUE 3 (1-5) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102, and CH 203 

The theory and practice of preparing temporary and permanent histological mounts 
for microscopic study. 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ZO 501* ADVANCED ORNITHOLOGY 3(^-3) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 252, or approval of the instructor 

Upland game birds, roils, and waterfowl — life histories, taxonomic relations, distribu- 
tion, habitat and territory, display and behavior, instinct and intelligence food habits, 
census methods, populations and factors affecting abundance, management problems 
and procedures, recent investigations, current literature. 

Mr. Quay 

ZO 513** ADVANCED ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY I 3(3-0) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 

Fundamentals of animal physiology from an advanced point of view. Lectures, dis- 
cussions, outside reading, written and oral reports. Topics in the field of animal 
physiology will be selected for vigorous and detailed consideration in lectures and col- 
lateral reading. Each student will, in addition, prepare a term report, ond his work 
will be supervised and evaluated during the preparation as well os at the end of the 
report. Selection of o few topics for study will be determined by the interests of the 
students and by their needs as may be expressed by the supervisor of their major work. 

Mr. Evers 



* Offered in olternate years. Will be given Spring 1958. 
**Offered in alternate years Will be given in Fall 1956. 



288 



ZOOLOGY 



ZO 521 FISHERY BIOLOGY 3(1-6) f 

Prerequisite: ZO 101, 102, ond approval of the instructor 

The principles and methods of fishery science. Current theories and proctices of fish 

management will be studied. The collection ond analysis of quantitative data will be 

emphasized. 

Mr. Hassler 

ZO 522 ANIMAL ECOLOGY 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites; ZO 101, 102 

The general principles of the interrelations between onimols and their environments 
— lond, fresh water, marine. 

Mr. Quay 

ZO 532 (GN 532)- BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATIONS 3 (3-0) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, ond approval of the instructor 

Recommended Correlatives: GN 411, ZO 301, and BO 421 
Qualitative and quantitative effects of radiations (other thon the visible spectrum) on 
biological systems, including both morphological and physiological aspects in a con- 
sideration of genetics, cytology, histology, and morphogenesis. 

Mr. Grosch 

ZO 541.542 COLO-BLOODED VERTEBRATES 3(1-4) s, or 3(1-4) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of fishes, omphibians, and reptiles. 
Lectures, loboratories, and field trips dealing with the systematic positions, life histories, 
interrelationships, and distribution of the particular groups of cold-blooded vertebrotes 
selected in accordance with the needs and interests of the class. 

Mr. Brandt 

ZO 544 MAMMALOGY 3(1-4) t 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102 and approval of the Instructor 

The classification and ecology of the major groups of mammals with particular empha- 
sis on the orders native to the Southeosiern United Stotes. 

Mr. Borkolow 

ZO 54S** HISTOLOGY 4(2-4) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102 

The microscopic onotomy of animal tissues. 

Mr. Harkemo 

ZO 551,552 WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 3(2-3) f s 

Prerequisites: ZO 252 ond 80 441, or approval of the instructor 

The basic principles of wildlife monogement and their application ore studied in the 
field and loboratjry. The course is designed primorily for those seniors mojoring in 
the field of wildlife monogement. 

Mr. Borkolow 

ZO S61*** ANIMAL EMBRYOLOGY 4(2-4) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102 

The study of fundomentol principles which apply in the achievement of complex oni- 

mal structure, including both invertebrote and vertebrate maleriols. Correlative loboro- 

tory study to provide training in the bosic disciplines and techniques. This course is 

intended for advanced students in entomology, animal industry, poultry science, and 

zoology. 

Mr Horkemo 

ZO 571 ADVANCED WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT, SPECIAL STUDIES Credits by 

Arrangement 

Prerequisites: ZO 551 or 312, and approval of the instructor 

A directed individual investigotion of o particular problem, accompanied by on ad- 
vanced survey of pertinent literature. A moximum of three credits ollowed toward 
the bachelor's degree, four toward the muster's degree, and six toward the doctorote. 

Staff 

* Offered in alternote years. Will be given Spring 1958. 
•• Offered in olternote years. Will be given Foil 1956. 
*** Offered in olternote yeors. Will be given Foil 1957. 



289 



ZOOLOGY 



ZO 581 FOOD HABITS PROBLEMS 3 (0-9) f s 

Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor 

Selected problem dealing with the foods and feeding habits of one species of wild 
animal or a group of similar animals. 

Staff 

ZO 591* PARASITOLOGY I 4(2-4) f 

Prerequisites: ZO 101, 102, and 223 

The study of the morphology, biology, and control of the parositic protozoa and hel- 
minths of man, domestic and wild animals. 

ZO 592 (ENT 582)** PARASITOLOGY II MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY 3(2-3) s 

Prerequisite: ENT 301, or approval of the instructor 

A study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic arthropods of man, 
domestic and wild animals. 

Mr. Harkema 

COURSES FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ZO 603 ADVANCED PARASITOLOGY 3 (2-3) s 

Prerequisites: ZO 591, 592 

The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism; taxonomy, physiology, 
and immunology of animal parasites. 

ZO 611 ANIMAL ECOLOGY, SPECIAL STUDIES Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: ZO 522, and approval of the instructor 

Directed individual investigation of a particular problem, accompanied by an advanced 
survey of literature. A maximum of three credits allowed toward the master's degree 
and six toward the doctorate. 

Staff 

ZO 614 ADVANCED ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY II 3 (3-0) f 

Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor 

Selected fundamental principles in physiology will be studied and interpreted for their 
relation to the vertebrates. Lectures and critical reports to promote acquaintance with 
general literature and recent advances. Lectures, discussions, written and oral reports. 

Mr, Evers 

ZO 622 SEMINAR 1 (1-0) f s 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

The presentation and defense of current literature papers dealing either with the 
findings of original research or with fundamental biological concepts. 

Staff 

ZO 627,628 ZOOGEOGRAPHY 3(3-0) f s 

Prerequisite: ZO 522, or approval of the instructor 

A study of the geographic distribution of animals with the consideration of some of 
the important factors influencing geographic distribution. 

Mr. Quay 

ZO 641 RESEARCH IN ZOOLOGY Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Twelve semester credits in Zoology, and approval of the instructor 
Problems in development, life history, morphology, physiology, ecology, game manage- 
ment, taxonomy, or parasitology. A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the 
master's degree but any number toward the doctorate. 

Staff 

* Offered in alternate years. Will be given Fall 1957. 
** Offered in alternate years. Will be given Spring 1958. 



290 



W'c clcxcloj) new ideas and iccli- 
niqiies. Rut our mission is more than 
that. W'e, also. de\eIop men who con- 
\crt the techniques into finer products 
and heahhier crops— for North Claro- 
Hna State College is an investment in 
tlie economic future of North Caro- 
lina. 

John ]\'illiam Hartrl.soii 
Chaurrllor. lOy-lQ'i^ 



291 




292 



Campus vista east from Kilgore and Scott Halls 
to the College Union and Library in background. 





1 fl 




i 1 ir ^ i 



OVER 550 TEACHERS 



GUIDING, MOLDING, TRAINING 



V. ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY OF 

N. C. STATE 



Page 

The Alumni Association 294 

College Foundations 294 

College Publications 295 

Summary of Enrollment 296 

Board of Trustees 297 

N. C State Administrative Council 299 

Officers of Instruction 300 

Special Staff 322 

293 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION- _______ 

H. \V. Taylor, Director of Alumni Affairs 

OBJECTIVES 

The purposes of the Alumni Association are: to promote the growth, progress, and 
general welfare of State College; to foster among its former students a sentiment of 
regard for one another and continuing attachment to their Alma Mater; and to interest 
jirospective students in attending State College. 

MEMBERSHIP ACTIVITIES 

Active menilership is availaVile to all former students, regardless of length of stay at 
the college; members of the faculty, administrative staff. Agricultural Extension Service, 
Agricultural Experiment Station, teachers of agriculture in North Carolina high schools; 
and other persons who have successfully completed a short course at North Carolina 
State College and received a certificate therefor. 

Honorary membership consists of such distinguished persons as are duly elected to 
honorary membership in the Association. The Association meets annually during Alumni 
Week. Class reunions (scheduled so that each class has a reunion every five years after 
graduation I are also held each year ir. connection with Alumni Week. Officers of the 
Association are elected by the active members each year through the medium of a mail 
ballot. Local State College clubs are organized in most of the counties in North Carolina 
and in a number of cities in other states. 

ALUMNI FUND 

This fund was establshed iiy the Alnmni Association at State College in 1952 to re- 
place the old dues paying program and provide a means through which the alumni may 
contribute to the advancement of the College. Each alumnus is invited to make an annual 
contribution. 

STATE COLLEGE NEWS 

State College Xcws is published every month in the year by the Alumni Association and 
sent to contributors to the Alumni Fund. The purpose of the magazine is to keep 
Association members in touch with the College and with each other. It carries news and 

pictui-es of former and orescnt Si.dents and of the college. 

THE ALUMNI OFFICE 

Records of both graduate and nongraduates are kept by the Alumni Oflfice. The master 
file includes information on all former students; other files are arranged geographically 
and by classes. Biographical files are also kept. 

Serving as a medium of communication between alumni and the College, the Alumni 
Office, located in the Old Infirmary Building, is official headquarters for alumni when 
they visit the campus. 

COLLEGE FOUNDATIONS- ________ 



L. L. Ray, Director 

There are eight foundations organized and incorporated under the laws of North 

Carolina which promote and support various programs of State College. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE FOUNDATION, INC. 

was organized on December 11, 1042 to foster and promote the general welfare of North 
Carolina State College and to I'eceive and administer gifts and donations for such pur- 
poses. The Board of Directors is composed of Alumni of State College and members 
of the Hoard of Trustees of the University of North Carolina. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL FOUNDATION, INC. 

renders financial assistance through supplements in the development of strong teaching 
programs in agriculture and assists the Extension Service and Agricultural Experiment 
Station of the School of Agriculture at North Carolina State College. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA DAIRY FOUNDATION, INC. 

aims to promote and improve all i)hases of dairying in North Carolina through educa- 
tion, research, and extension. A Board of Directors of sixty persons handles the affairs 
of the Foundation; these directors represent distributors, producers, and jobbers. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA ENGINEERING FOUNDATION, INC. 

gives financial assistance to teaching, reseaich, and extension in and through the School 
of Engineering. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA TEXTILE FOUNDATION, INC. 

was formed to promote the development of the School of Textiles, and was incorporated 
on December 'M, 1942. Pounds for this Foundation have 1 een raised largely from textile 
manufacturing plants and other corporations and industries closely allied to textiles. 

294 



THE NORTH CAROLINA ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION, INC 

was orK'ani/.e.i in Jiiniiary, l;i|;i. F.,„,Hlaliu„ f.MwIs are i.sol for the i.ror.iotion an.I ad- 
van.-cmcnl of arohite.-tiiral odmalion at North C.irolina State College. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA FORESTRY FOUNDATION 

wa« incorporated April 15. IS.J-.i The Foun.iation has acquired a tract of land known as 
the Hofmann Forest. consistinK of about 80,000 acres in Jones and Onslow counties, which 
IS used as a demonstration and research laboratory for forestry students. 

PULP AND PAPER FOUNDATION, INC. 

Incorporated December 1<J. iy54 by the southern pulp and paper mills, for the purpose 
of supporting the program of pulp and paper technology in the School of Forestry. 



— — — — — — — — —COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

THE STATE COLLEGE RECORD 

otiicial publication .,f Stat,, <■olk.^re. is issued monthly an,l anno.inces the results of 
bpecial htudtes and of research by members of the faculty. The March issue is generally 
the annual Catalog, with announcements for the following year. Announcements con- 
cerning College Extension courses are also made through the Record series 
Brief notices of the short courses and special conferences which are held on the camous 
from time to time are issued by the Division of College Extension. The Director of 
houndations likewise publishes brochures which are of special interest to North Caro- 

THE STATELOG 

is published monthly by the College to relate to the people of the state news of what 
liV "f'hL'Vu "' '^'"te College and to strengthen the traditional link between the services 
of the College and the progress of the state. Subscription to the Statelo,, is free to 
all interested persons. 

TECHNICAL AND SEMI-POPULAR BULLETINS 

are issued by the AK-ricultural Experiment Station when research projects are completed 
or when they have progressed far enough that the results are seen to be of definite 
,';'r Ji; C*""*-'."' publications interpreting the scientific findings of the Experiment Station 
or g.N ng the results of Extension demonstrations are compiled by members of the 
Agricultural Extension staff and printed as circulars, folders, and pamphlets Designed 
for popular use these are usually written in a brief, clear style. Copies of these publica- 
tions are sent free to citizens of the state upon request. Publication of these bulletins 
IS announced by the press and radio of the state. ouiieiins 

RESEARCH AND FARMING, 

a quarterly bulletin journal written in popular style and giving the results of research 
?"n eHmenf s"at o?*'^'*'" """'''"'^tion of the information obtained is published by the 

EXTENSION FARM NEWS 

published monthly i.s the official house organ of the Extension Service. Subscription to 
Carolinr^"'' "" ^'"■"""'' ''"'• Extension Farm News is free to citizens of North 

AGRICULTURE 

An annual report published by the School of Agriculture contains a resume of activities 
of the Experiment Station. Extension Service, and Resident Teaching. 

ENGINEERING SCHOOL BULLETINS 

showing results of experimental and research projects in the School of Engineering 
are made available by the Department of Engineering Research. Kineering 

ENGINEERING RESEARCH NEWS, 

a .,uarterl.v publication of the Department of Engineering Research, is a review of 

«M.7n . f 'Vif ri" '^^ ^''*'"''' °' Engineering. Copies of these publications may be 
obtained from the Department, 

TEXTILE PUBLICATIONS 

pertaining to research may be .secured from the Dean of the Schcxd of Textiles. 



295 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT, 1955-56 



RESIDENT STUDENTS 

RcKular Session 

Freshmen 1,751 

Sophomores 1,138 

Juniors 846 

Seniors 748 

Professionals 56 

Graduates 456 

Specials and Unclassified 133 

Auditors 43 

5.181 
Men . 5.073 

Women 108 

5,181 



EXTENSION, CONFERENCES, 

SHORT COURSES 

July 1, 1955— June 30, 1956 

Extension Classes 1.985 

Correspondence Courses 2,286 

Short Courses and Con- 
ferences 5,384 

Gaston Technical Institute . 233 



9.888 



ENROLLMENT BY CURRICULA, 1955-56— _ _ _ — 
REGULAR SESSION 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Agriculture 244 Ajrricultural Education 226 

AKricultural Economics 45 Industrial Arts Education 96 

Agricultural Engineering 75 Industrial Education 2 

Agri. and Biol. Chemistry 25 Industrial Psychology 16 

Agronomy* 113 Ind. and Rural Recreation 119 

Animal Ecology 2 Mathematics Education 19 

Animal Industry 120 Occup. Inf. and Guidance 14 

Botany 6 Science Education 9 

Dairy Manufacturing 40 Total 500 

Entomology 24 

Experimental Statistics 31 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Horticulture ■::::;:::::::::::::::■.:; 25 Appned Mathematics 10 

Mechanized Agriculture 17 S^f'"^"?"=, 'J 

Plant Pathology 15 ^r«'?'"=''' Jf2 

Plant Physiology 3 S;"^'.' _. V ■-■•;• V» ?oc 

Poultry Science 12 ^'vil Engineenng. Const. Op 125 

Rural Sociology 10 Construction 16 



Electrical 644 

Engineering Physics 17 



Wildlife Cons, and Mgt 

Zoology 12 1 « * An 

>p J 1 ggg Furniture Mfg. and Mgt 47 

Geological 82 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN «*?**"»: f "«> ^ir Cond 71 

Industrial 176 

Architecture 216 Mechanical 613 

Landscape Architecture 20 Mechanical, Aero. Opt 166 

Total 236 Nuclear 220 

Total 2,679 



296 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

Fidostiy 

Forest ManiiKt'nionl 

Pulp iind Paper Technology 

Wood Production MiMchamlisinK 

Wood TechnoloKy 

Total . 



130 
72 
18 
18 
13 

251 



SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Textile Chemistry 40 

Textile MnnufacturitiK 10 

Textiles 411 

Total 461 



NOT CLASSIFIED 

llnclassitied I'lKlerKraduHtes, Auditors, 

and Special Students 148 

Unclassified (iraduates 38 

Total 186 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Distribution of (irailuate students by 
schools ( included in above depart- 
mental classification) : 

Agriculture 221 

Education 78 

EnKineerinK 118 

Forestry 18 

Textiles 21 

Total 456 

GRAND TOTAL 5.181 



OFFICERS 



iikI Kn^rineerinK. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The North Carolina State C'ollei;e of Ak'ricultun 

The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

The Woman's Collevre of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Luther H. Hodnes. (iovcrnor. Chairman Kx-Officio 

Arch T. Allen. Secretary 

Charles F. Carroll, State Supt. of Public InKtruction, Member Kx-Officio 

R. GreKK Cherry. Life Truxtce 

W. Kerr Scott. IJfc Trustee 



TERM EXPIRING APRIL 1, 1957 



Name 

B. B. Everett 

Mrs. R. S. Ferguson 
Harry A. Greene 

F. D. B. Harding 
Mrs. Albert Lathrop 
Kemp B. Nixon 

G. N. Noble 
Thomas J. Pcarsall 
H. L. Ki.ldlc. Jr. 
John C Hoilman 
Koy Rowe 

('. Wayland Spruill 

Mrs. Charles W. Stanford 

John P. Stedman 

C. Lacy Tate 
H. P. Taylor 

W. Frank Taylor 

Mrs. May L. Tomlinson 

F. E. Wnllace 

D. Libby Ward 
James L. Woodson 



City 



County 



Palmyra 


Halifax 


Taylomville 


Alexander 


Raeford 


Hoke 


Yadkin ville 


Yadkin 


Aalieville 


Buncombe 


Lincolnton 


Lincoln 


Trenton 


Jones 


Rochii Moiinl 


Xash 


Moniaiilttn 


Burke 


Waahinnlon 


Beaufort 


Burgaw 


Pender 


Win<iaor 


Bertie 


Chapel Hill 


Orange 


Lumberton 


Robeson 


Chadbourn 


Columbus 


Wadenboro 


Anson 


Goldnboro 


Wayne 


Higli Point 


C.uilford 


Kinstoti 


Lenoir 


New Bern 


Craven 


Salinburii 


Rowan 



297 



TERM EXPIRING APRIL 1, 1959 



Name 



City 



County 



Arch T. Allen 

Mrs. Ed M. Anderson 

William C. Barfield 

Kemp D. Battle 

F. Jack Blythe 

Charles A. Cannon 

Mrs. Nancy Hall Copeland 

W. C. Harris, Jr. 

Huirh G. Horton 

Dr. Paul E. Jones 

A. H. London 

Mrs. P. P. McCaiss 

John J. Parker 

J. Hampton Price 

Claude W. Rankin 

Dr. B. F. Royal 

F. S. Royster 

William P. Saunders 

Fred P. Saunders 

Dr. Shahane Taylor 

Oscar Vatz 

Herman Weil 

Hill Yarborough 

J. R. Young 



Raleigh 

Went Jeffemon 

Wilmington 

Rocky Mount 

Charlotte 

Concord 

Murfreesboro 

Raleigh 

Williamston 

I'lirm ville 

J'ittshoro 

Red Springs 

Charlotte 

LeaksviUe 

Fayetteville 

Morchead City 

Oxford 

Aberdeen 

Kinston 

Greensboro 

Fayetteville 

Goldsboro 

Louisburg 

Dunn 



Wake 

Ashe 

Xeic Hanover 

\ash 

Mecklenburg 

Cabarrus 

Hertford 

Wake 

Martin 

Pitt 

Chatham 

Robeson 

Mecklenburg 

Rockingham 

Cumberland 

Carteret 

Granville 

Moore 

Lenoir 

Guilford 

Cumberland 

Wayne 

Franklin 

Harnett 



TERM EXPIRING APRIL 1, 1961 



Name 



City 



County 



Wade Barber 

Frank H. Brown, Jr. 

Victor S. Bryant 

John W. Clark 

W. Lunsford Crew 

R. Floyd Crouse 

Horton Doughton 

A. C. Edwards 

Henry A. Fescue 

Robert M. Hanes 

Dr. L. J. Herring 

Mrs. J. B. Kittrell 

John D. Larkins, Jr. 

Dr. Harvey B. Mann 

C. Knox Massey 

Reid A. Maynard 

Glenn C. Palmer 

Ediwn S. Pou 

Grace Taylor Rodenbough 

A. Alex Shuford. Jr. 

L. H. Swindell 

Mrs. Charles W. Tillett 

Carl V. Venters 

J. Shelton Wicker 

E. Leigh Winslow 



Pittsboro 

Cullowhee 

Durham 

Franklinville 

Roanoke Rapids 

Sparta 

Statesville 

Hookerton 

Hi ill, Point 

H'in.iton-Salem 

WiLson 

Greenville 

Trenton 

Lake Landing 

Durham 

Burlington 

Clyde 

Raleigh 

Walnut Cove 

Hickory 

Wtt.ihington 

Charlotte 

Jacksonville 

San ford 

Hertford 



Chatham 

Jackson 

Durham 

Randolph 

Halifax 

Alleiihany 

Iredell 

Greene 

Guilford 

Forsyth 

Wilson 

Pitt 

Jones 

Hyde 

Durham 

Alamance 

Haywood 

Wake 

Stokes 

Catawba 

Beaufort 

Mecklenburg 

Onslow 

Lee 

Perquimans 



298 



TERM EXPIRING APRIL 1, 1963 



Name 



City 



County 



Mrs. Oscar Barker 

H. D. Hnteman 
Irwin Belk 
Mitchell Uritt 
Mrs. Mebane H. BurKwyn 
S. N. Clark. Jr. 
T. J. Collier 
A. Roy Cox 
Euuene Cross 

Hen K. Fountain 
O. Max Gardner, Jr. 
John G. H. r.eitner 
GeorKC Watts Hill 
John H. Kerr, Jr. 
M. C. Lassiter 
J. Spencer Love 
D. L. McMichael 
Rudolph I. Mintz 
Thomas O. Moore 
Ashley M. Murphy 
Mrs. R. C. Parker 
Thomas Turner 
John W. I'mstead, Jr. 
Sam L. Whitehurst 
Macon M. Williams 



Purham 

Wilson 

Charlotte, iOO Eastover Road 

Warsaiv 

Jarhson 

Tarhoro 

Hai/boro 

Ashrhoro 

Marion 

Rorky Mount 

Shclhy 

Hickory 

Ihirliam, III Corcoran Street 

Warrenton 

Snow Hill 

Greenaboro 

Madison 

Wilminpton 

Winston-Salem 

Atk'nson 

Albemarle 

Greensboro 

Chapel Hill 

\'ew Bern — Rt. 1 

Lenoir 



Durham 

Wilson 

Mecktcnbiiry 

Duplin 

Northampton 

Edpccombe 

I'amlico 

Randolph 

McDowell 

Edfiecomhe 

Cleveland 

Catairba 

Dnrhnm 

Warren 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rockingham 

Netv Hanover 

Forsyth 

Pender 

Stanly 

Guilford 

Orange 

Craven 

Caldwell 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

Luther H. Hodges, Governor, Chairman Ex-Of^icio 
.Arch T. Allen, Secretary 

Wade Barber Rudolph L Mintz 

Victor S. Brvant Thomas J. Pearsall 

John W. Clark John J. Parker 

George W. Hill W. Frank Taylor 

Mrs. VirKinia T. Lathrop Mrs. May L. Tomlinson 
Reid A. Maynard J. W. Umstead. Jr. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE, OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

Carey H. Bostian, A.B., M.S.. PH.D., Chancellor. Chairman 

D. B. Anderson. B..A., M..A.. Ph.D.. As.-.oc ate Dean of the Graduate School 
M. E. Campbell. B.S.. Dean of the School of Textiles 



D. W. Colvard. B.S.. M.S. 
C. Addison Hickman. B.A. 
H. L. Kaninhoefner. B.S., 
J. B. Kirkland. B.S.. M.S., 
J. H. Lampe. B.S.. M.S.. 



Ph.D.. Drau of the School of Agricu'ture 
. M..A.. Ph.D.. Dean of the School of General Studies 
M.S.. Dean of the School of De-'.iijn 
Ph.D.. I>ean of the School of Education 
DR. ENG.. Dean of the School of Enqineerimj 



R. J. Preston. A.B.. M.F.S.. Ph.D.. Dean of the School of Forestry 

L. L. Ray, Assistant to the Chancellor in Charge of Development and Director 

of Foundations 
John W. Shirley, Dean of the Faculty 

J. J. Stewart. Jr.. B.S.. M.A.. fUan of Student Affairs. Secretary 
J. G. Vann, business Manuijer 



COLLEGE POLICY 

By action of the Trustees, the General Faculty Includes all members of the College's 
teaching force above the rank of Instructor and all general administrative officers of the 
institution. In the President of the Consolidated University, the Chancellor of the 
College, and the General Faculty is vested final authority (under the Trustees) over 
all matters of College policy and activity. Under the General Faculty and Ailministrative 
Council, the Schools have separate Faculties and Administrative Boards (composed of 
all Department Heads) which have final authority over matters pertaining solely to 
their respective Schools, when not in conflict with Consolidated University and College 
regulations. 



299 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION— _______ 

• As of January 1, I'.'oG 

WILLIAM CLYDE FRIDAY, 

Artinii rrctidrtit. U.S.. N. C. State College: L.L.H., Univeisitv of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM M. WHYHURN, 

.■\,t )i(j I'roroxt. A.H.. M.A., Ph.D.. Texas: L.L.D.. Texas TechnoloKical College. 
CAREY HOYT BOSTIAN, 

Chanrcllor, A.B., Catawba College; M.S., Ph.D., University of PittsburKh. 
CATHERINE WEBER ABRUZZl, 

In»tructor in Economics, B.A., M.A., University of California, Los AnKeles. 
JAMES E. ADAMS, 

Instructor in Architecture, B. Arch., University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 

M. .\rch., Harvard University. 
WILLIAM ELTON ADAMS, 

Director of lnstructi<yn. School of Engineering, and Associate Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering. B.S., Ohio University: M.S., North Carolina State College. 
STANTON CAMPBELL AGNEW, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Lt. Colonel, U. S. Air Force, B.A., University 

of Missouri. 
JOSEPH LEWIS ALLISON, 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Montana State Collexe; M.S. State ColleKe, 

Washington: Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
FRED J. ALLRED. 

Assistant Profe-^sor of Modern Lanuages, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
JAMES PHILLIP AMMERMAN. JR.. 

.4.s.s/.s(aH/ f'rofen.inr of Animal Industry, B.S., University of Kentucky. 
CHARLES NOEL ANDERSON 

Instructor in Mathematics, B.E.E.. M.E.Math., North Carolina State College. 
DONALD BENTON ANDERSON, 

Associate Dean of Graduate School, Head of Division of Biological Sciences and 

Professor of liotanu, B.A.. B.Sc.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
RICHARD LOREE ANDERSON, 

Professor of Exjierimeyital Statistics, A.B., DePauw University; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa 

State College. 
ROY NELS ANDERSON, 

I'rofessor of Education and Director of Student Personnel, B.A., University of 

Denver: M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
W'lLLIAM ALLEN ANDREWS, 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S., Arch. E., M.S.C.E., Sc. D.C.E., Wash- 

inirton University. 
LINDSEY OTIS ARMSTRONG, 

Professor of Auricultural Education, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
CLARENCE MONROE ASBILL, JR. 

Professor of Textile Machine Design and Development, B.S., Clemson ColleKe. 
LEONARD WILLIAM AURAND, 

Research .As.sociate I'rofessor of Animal Industry, B.S., Pennsylvania State College; 

M.S.. University of New Hampshire, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
WILLIAM WYATT AUSTIN, JR., 

Head of Department and Professor of Metallurgy, B.S., BirminKham Southern Col- 
lege, M.S., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
WILLARD FARRINGTON BABCOCK, 

Professor of Civil Entiinecrinti, B.S., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
BRUCE LLOYD BAIRD. 

Instructor in .Sf>//.s. B.S., M.S., Utah State College 
STEWART ROLANDUS BAKER. 

Instructor in Mathematics, B.A., Ursinus College: M.Math., North Carolina State 

College. 
ERNEST BALL, 

Associate Professor of Botany, B.S., M.S., Oklahoma University; Ph.D., University 

of California. 
STANLEY THOMAS BALLENGER. 

.Associate Professor of Modern Lanouai/es, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
PAULL ALONZO BANE, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Lt. Col. Armor, U. S. Army. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University. 
CLIFFORD WARREN BARBER. 

Professor of Poultry Science, D.V.M.. Colorado State College; Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
WILLIAM JOHN BARCLAY, 

Associate I'rofessor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., Oregon State College; E.E., 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
ALDOS C. BAREFOOT, 

Assistant Professor of Forest Utilization. B.S., M.Wood Tech., North Carolina State 

College. 



300 



WARRKN SANDUSKY BARHAM, 

Asgociatc I'rofessor of Horticulture, B.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
FREDKRICK SCHRNCK RARKALOW, JR., 

Head of Zooloiiii Faculty a)id I'rofcusor of Zoolotjy, B.S., Geortjia School of Tech- 

noiok'v: M.S., Ph.D.. llniversity of Michigan. 
KEY LEE BARKLEY, 

ActiiKj Head, Department of Psychology: Director of Applied Experimental Pny- 

rholojiy Laboratory and Professor of Psychology, B.A., Berea ColleKe; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina. 
RALPH GARNETT BARNARD. 

Research Associate, Department of Textile Research and Research Instructor in Tex- 
tiles; B.S., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
NEAL ALEXANDER BARNES, 

Instructor in Agricultural fJnginccring, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
LUTHER WESLEY BARNHARDT. 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, A.B., Trinity Collette: A.M., 

University of Wisconsin. 
CATHERINE CRKC.ORY BARNHART. 

Instructor in h'nglish, A.B., Salem College; M.A., Universitv of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM J. BARNHART, 

Instructor in English, A.B., University of Tennessee: M.A., Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina. 
JOHN HAROLD BARRETT. 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.S.. M.A., Ph.D.. Rice Institute. 
ELLIOTT RAY BARRICK. 

Head of Animal Husbandry Section and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Okla- 
homa .\. & M. ColleKe; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue Universitv. 
ANDREW JACKSON HARTLEY. 

Assistant Professor of Economics, B..A.. B. S., M.A., University of Missouri. 
FREDERICK LEROY BATES. 

Assistant I'rofessor in Rural Sociology, B.S.. M.A.. George WashinKton University; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM LUDWIC. BAUMC.A RTEN, 

Professor of Architecture, Dipl. in Arch., Imperial Academy of Fine Arts of Vienna. 
DAVID HARDING BAXTER. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, B.C.E.. North Carolina State College. 
ERNEST OSCAR BEAL. 

Assistant Professor of Botany, B.A., North Central ColleKe; M.S.. Ph.D.. State 

University of Iowa. 
KENNETH ORION BEATTY, JR.. 

Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S.Ch.E., M.S., Lehigh University: Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan . 
JACOB LYNFORD BEAVER 

Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering, E.E., M.S., Lehigh University: Sc.D., 

Harvard Universitv. 
ROGER Rl'REL BELL, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, D.V.M., University of GeorKia; M.S., Texas 

AKricultural and Mechanical Colle-'o. 
BURTON FLOYD BEERS, 

Instructor in History and Political Science, B.A., Hobart ColleKe: M.A., Duke 

University. 
WILLIAM CALLUM BELL, 

Research I'rofessor of Ceramic Engineering. B.S., North Carolina State College: 

M.S.. Ph.D.. Ohio State University. 
ERNEST HEZOLD BERRY, 

Assistant I'rofessor of Textiles, B.S., Clemson College. 
JAMES SAMIEL BETHEL. 

Professor of Wood Technology, B.S.F., University of Washington: M.F.. D.F., Duke 

University. 
CHARLES EDWIN BISHOP. 

Associate Professor, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Agricultural 

Economics, B.S., Berea College; M.S.. University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of 

ChicaKo. 
THOMAS JACKS BLALOCK, 

Instructor in Chemistry, B.S., Presbyterian College; M.A., University of North 

Carolina. 
LEONARD FRANKLIN BLANTON. 

Instructor in Animal Industry. B.S., North Carolina State College. 
GEORGE BENJAMIN BLUM. JR. 

Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, B.S.. North Carolina State College. 
THOMAS NELSON BLUMER, 

.4/i<ioriVi^e Professor of Animal Industry, B.S.. Pennsylvania State College: Ph.D.. 

Michigan State College 



301 



JOHN FRANCIS BOGDAN, 

frofcmior of Tcxtilcn and Director of Procexsing Research, B.T.E., Lowell Textile 

Institute. 
ALFRED FRANCIS BORfi. 

AitKOciate Professor of Potany, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.. I'niversity of Washington 
PHILIPPE FRANCOIS BOURDEAU, 

Assistant Professor of Botany, InR. For., I. A. C.x., Belgium; M.A.. Ph.D., Duke 

I'niversity. 
HENRY DITTIMUS BOWEN, 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Enginccrinsi, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State 

ColleKe. 
THOMAS GLENN BOWERY, 

li> Kcarcli Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.S., MichiRan State CollcKe: M.S., Ph.D., 

Ruttrers University. 
EDWARD HOSMER BRADFORD, 

licscarch Associate, Department of Textile Research and Research Assistant Professor 

in Textiles, B.T.E., Lowell Te.xtile Institute. 
CHARLES RAYMOND BRAMER. 

Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S., E.M., Michigan Collejre of Mining and Metal- 

lurtry. 
BARTHOLOMEW BRANDNER BRANDT, 

Professor of Zoology, B.S.. Mississippi State College; A.M., Ph.D., Duke University. 
VESTER ROBERTSON BRANTLEY. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Wake Forest College. 
PAUL ARNOLD BREDENBERG, 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion and Social Studies, B.A., University 

of Pennsylvania: Ph.D., Yale University. 
CHARLES HENRY BRETT. 

Associate Professor of Entomology, B.S.. M.S., LTniversity of Nebraska: Ph.D.. 

Kansas State College. 
WILLIAM STALEY BRIDGES, 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.E., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
HERMON BURKE BRIGGS, 

Professor Emeritus of Engineering Drawing and Descriptive Geometry, B.E., M.E., 

North Carolina State College. 
RICHARD BRIGHT, 

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S., M.S., State University of Iowa. 
CHARLES A. BRIM, 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops (Coop USDA), B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Nebraska. 
PERLEY FLOYD BROOKENS, 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.A., Univei'sity of South Dakota: Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Mary!anfl. 
KING RICHARD BROSE. 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.M.E.. B.I.E., North Carolina State 

College. 
BENJAMIN FLOYD BROWN. 

Research Associate Professor of Metallurgy in Engineering Research, B.S.. Uni- 
versity of Kentucky: M.S., S.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BROWN, 

Dean of the School of General Studies, B.S., Northwestern University. 
DAVID CHARLES BROWN, 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, B.S., N. C. State College. 
EDMOND JOSEPH BROWN, 

Assistant Professor of I'hysics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
MARVIN LUTHER BROWN. JR. 

Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, A.B., Haverford College: 

A.M., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
TALMAGE THURMAN BROWN, 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
THEODORE CECIL BROWN, 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., M.E., University of 

Kentucky: M.S., North Carolina State College. 
WILLIAM LEWIS BROWN, 

Instructor in Animal Industry, B.S., Clemson College: M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
THOMAS EVERETTE BROWNE, 

Director Emeritus of the Division of Teacher Education, h.A., Wake Forest College: 

M.A., CoIuml)ia University. 
WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, JR., 

Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, B.A., P.A.E., B.E., Extra Ordinem. 

Johns Hopkins University. 



302 



WILLIAM ALKXANDER BRUN. 

AHMinfatit I'rofcsHor of Botany, B.S., University of Miami; M.S., }'h.D.. University 
of Illinois. 
KALPH C. HHYANT. 

rro),sH„r of Forest Kronomics, B.S., M.F.. Yale University; Ph.D.. Uiike University 
WILLIAM LAWHKNCK BRYANT. '^■s'i.>. 

hiHlrurlor in Atjriculiural Education. B.S.. North Carolina State Colleire. 
KOHKKTS COZAHT BULLOCK. 

rrofc»xor of Mathematics, B.A.. M.A., University of North Carolina: Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of ChicaKO. 
HARVEY LINDY BUMGARDNER. 

.•l«.-.M/a»i/ I'rofcssor of Poultry Science. B.S.. North Carolina State College; M S. 
rh.D.. University of Maryland. 
ELVA BURGESS, 

AHxixtaut I'rofcsgor of Vxychology. A.B.. Meredith Colletie: M.S., North Carolina 
State College; Ph.D.. Pennsylvania State College. 
MICHAEL DAVID CAFFEY, JR., 

AxsiMant I'rofomor of I'surholouy, B.A., Guilford Colles^e; M.A., Teachers Colleire. 
Columbia I'niversity. 
GEORGE CHARLES CALDWELL. 

hiHtrurtor in Mathcmaticn, A.B., M.A.. University of North Carolina. 
HORACIO CAMINOS. 

MHitinti AxHociate Profenxor of Architecture, Diploma in .Architecture, University of 
Buenos Aires. 
KENNETH STODDARD CAMPBELL. 

I'rofcsHor of Textile Chemistry, B.S., Clemson College; B.A.. Bates College. 
MALCOLM EUGENE CAMPBELL. 

Ihan of the School of TcxtilcH. Graduate of the New Be Iford Te.\tile Institute; 
B.S.. Clemson College. 
EMMETT JOHN CANADAY, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics. B.A., William Jewell ColleKe; M.A., Missouri 
llniversit.v. 
IRVING THEODORE CARLSON 

Assistant I'rofessor of Field Crops. B.S.. M.S.. Washington State College; Ph.D.. 
University of Wisconsin. 
CHARLES LEMUEL CARROLL, 

Associate I'rofessor of Mathematics, B.S., Guilford College; M..\., Ph.D.. University 
of North Carolina. 
SARAH PORTER CARROLL. 

Research Instructor in Experimental Statistics, A.B., Meredith College; M.S., North 
Carolina State Collejre. 
ROBERT GORDON CARSON. JR. 

Head of Department and Professor of Industrial Eniiineerinij, B.S., Clemson CollcKe; 
M.S.. Geori^ia Institute of TechnoioKy; Ph.D.. University of Michigan. 
VICTOR STUART CARSON, 

I'rofessor of Electrical Engineerinu, B.S.. Oregon State College; E.E., Ph.D,. Leland 
Stanfonl University. 
ROY MERWIN CARTER, 

Professor of Wood Tcchnolotiy, B.S.F.. University of Minnesota; M.S., Michigan 
State College. 
ROBERT BARNES CASADY, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S.. Ph.D., I'niversitv of California. 
EDl'ARDO FERNANDO CATALANO, 

Actin,! Head of Department and Visitinfi Professor of Architecture, Diploma in 
Architecture, University of Buenos Aires; M.Arch.. University of Pennsylvania: 
M..Arch., Harvard University. 
DAVID MARSHALL CATES. 

Assistant Director, Chemical Research, Department of Textile Research, and Research 
Assistant I'rofessor in Textile Chemistry, B.S., M.S.. North Carolina State College: 
M.A.. Ph.D.. Princeton University. 
JOHN WESLEY CELL. 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A.. Ph.D.. University of Illinois. 
DOUGLAS SCALES CHAMBLEE. 

Associate Professor of Field Crops, B.S.. M.S.. North Carolina State College; Ph.D. 
Iowa State College. 
CLIFFORD DALE CLARK. 

Assistant Professor of Economics. B.A., University of Kansas; M.A.. Ph D Univer- 
sity of Chicago. ' 
JOSEPH DEADRICK CLARK. 

t L-ii'/c^^^.T^Vi^ Z;"?'^"''- ^■^- ^'"'""'l''tt University: M.A.. Harvard University. 
LEWIS JAMES CLARKE, 

ri«i7irif/ Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Dip. in Arch. SchiM.l of 
Arch., I^icester: Dip. in L.D.. Kings College. University of Durham; M.L.A.. HnrvanI 
I niversity. 
JOHN MONTGOMERY CLARKSON, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., WofTord College; M.A.. Duke Univei-sity; Ph.D 
Cornell University. 



303 



ALHKUT J. CLAWSON. 

AnKistant J'rofcHnor of Animal Industry, B.S., University of Nebraska: M.S., Kansas 

State College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
CARLYLE NEWTON CLAYTON, 

I'rofcsnor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Clemson College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
MAURICE HILL CLAYTON. 

Instructor in Engineering Mechanics, B.S., Wake Forest CoIleKe; M.E.Math., North 

Carolina State College. 
JOHN JAMES CLEARY, 

Assistant Professor of Aeronautical Engineering, B.S. in Ae. E., M.S. in Ae. E., 

University of Notre Dame. 
FRED DERWARD COCHRAN, 

Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Clemson College; M.S., Louisiana State University; 

Ph.D., l^niversity of California. 
COLUMBUS CLARK COCKERHAM, 

Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State 

College; Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
JAMES KIRK COGGIN, 

Professor of Agricultural Education, In Charge In-Service Training, B.S., North 

Carolina State College; M.S., Cornell University. 
JAMES LAWRENCE COLE, 

Instructor in Social Studies, A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Princeton L'niversity. 
NATHANIEL TERRY COLEMAN, 

Professor of Soils, B.A., Knox College; Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
HERBERT COLLINS, 

Assistant Professor of Social Studies, B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Duke University. 
DEAN WALLACE COLVARD, 

Dean of School of Agriculture and Professor of AnimcU Industry, B.S., Berea College; 

M.S., University of Missouri; Ph.D., Purdue University. 
WILLIAM EARLE COLWELL, 

Assistant Director of Research, In Charge Tobacco Research in Srhool of Agriculture 

and Professor of Soils, B.S., University of Nebraska; M.S., University of Idaho; 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
RALPH ERNEST COMSTOCK, 

Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
NORVAL WHITE CONNER, 

Director, Engineering Research, B.S., M.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute: M.S., 

Iowa State College. 
•FREEMAN WALDO COOK, 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
LEON EMORY COOK. 

Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Education, B.A., B.S., Agri., M.S., Cornell 

University. 
WILLIAM R. COOK, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, First Lieutenant, U. S. Air Force: B.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 
HENRY CHARLES COOKE, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
WILLIAM EARL COOPER, 

Research Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Arkansas A. & M. College; 

M.S., Oklahoma A. & M.; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
RALPH LELAND COPE, 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, B.S.M.E., B.S.Ind.Ed. M.Ed.. Penn- 
sylvania State College. 
WILL ALLEN COPE, 

Research Instructor of Field Crops (Coop USDA), B.S., M.S., .Mabama Polytechnic 

Institute 
OTIS BRYANT COPELAND. 

Head, Division of Agricultural Information, B.S., M.S., University of Georgia. 
HAROLD MAXWELL CORTER. 

Director of Psychological Clinic and Associate Professor of Psychology, B.S. State 

Teiohers College (Lock Haven, Pa.); M.Ed., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
ARTHUR JAMES COUTU, 

Research Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.S., University of 

Connecticut. 
GERTRUDE MARY COX, 

Director, Institute of Statistics and Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., M.S., 

Iowa State ColleKe. 
JOSEPH H. COX, 

Associate Professor of Design, B.F..^., John Herron Art School: M.F.A., Univer- 
sity of Iowa. 
DORIS LEE CRAIG, 

Instructor in Soils, B.A., Winthrop College; M.A., University of North Carolina. 



• On leave of absence, 1956-.57. 



304 



WINIFKKD HAKUISON CKANOK, 

Remearelt Aanociate Department of Textile Rcnearch, and Rcucarch hmtructor De- 
partment of Textile Chemistry; B.S., Woman's CollcKe, University of North Carolina. 
ALBERT CRAWFORD, 

AHxiiitant I'rofesfior of Induatriai and Rural Recreation, U.S., Appalachian Slate 

Teachers ColleKe: M.Ed., University of North Carolina. 
FREDERICK RUDOLPH CROWNFIELD. JR.. 

Inittrurtor in Fhyxicx, A.B., Harvard ColleKe; M.S., Ph.D.. Lehinh University. 
RALPH WALDO CUMMINGS, 

Director of Experiment Station and I'rofexnor of Soiln, B.S., North Carolina State 

ColleKe: Ph.D.. Ohio Slate University. 
MELFORD RAYMOND DAMRON, JR.. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, B.C.E., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
MARJORIE DAVIDSON. 

I'art-time Instructor of Psychology, A.B., M.A., Alberta Univei-sity. 
GEORC.E E. DAVIS. 

.Aitsistant Professor of Occupational Information and Guidance, B.A., Salem ColleKe. 
PHILIP HARVEY DAVIS. 

.{.■iHoriate Professor of English, B.A.. M.A.. Miami University. 
LYMAN ARNOLD DEAN. 

\'isitin<] Professor of Agronomy, B.S., University of Hawaii: M.S.. Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 
RAY STYRING DEARSTYNE. 

Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., University of Maryland: M.S.. North Carolina 

State ColleKe. 
PAUL HAROLD DEER. 

Head of Department and Professor of Physical Education, B.S.. University of 

Illinois: M.A.. New York University. 
ERIC BROOKS DEGROAT. 

.Assistant Professor of Phy.tical Education, B.S., Sprinsrfield ColleKe: M.A.. New York 

LTniversity. 
EMMETT URCEY DILLARD. 

Research Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S.. Berea ColleKe: M.S.. North 

Carolina State ColleKe: Ph.D., Univei-sity of Missouri. 
RICHARD DAVID DILLENDER. 

Research Assistant in Engineering Research, B.Cer.E.. North Carolina State ColleKe. 
ELLIS GADSDEN DISEKER. 

Research .Issociate Professor of Agricultural Engineering (Coop. L'SDA), B.S.. M.S., 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
DANIEL ROBERT DIXON. 

Instructor in Economic.t. .A.H., William ami Mary: L.L.H.. Duke University: L.L.M.. 

New York University. 
CHARLES GLENN DOAK. 

Professor Emeritus of Physical Education. 
JAMES RUSSELL DOGGER. 

Assistant Profesor of Entomoloay, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
JESSE SEYMOUR DOOLITTLE. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., Tufts College: M.S.. Pennsylvania Slate 

ColleKe. 
PAUL NEWELL DROLSOM. 

Assistant Research Professor of Plant Pathology (Coop. USDA). B.S.. M.S.. Ph.D.. 

l.'niversity of Wisconsin. 
VERNON BURGE DRUM. 

.■\ssistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Major. SiKnal Corps. U. S. Army. 
WARREN EMMETT DUNGAN. 

Research .Assistant in Engineering Research, B.NucI.EnKr., North Carolina State 

ColleKe. 
GEORGE HEYWARD DUNLAP, 

Textile Consultant and Director of Textile Placement Bureau, B.S., Clemson ColleKe. 
G. A. EASON, 

Instructor of Engineering Mechanics, B.C.E., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
PRESTON WILLIAM EDSALL, 

Head of Department and Professor of History and I'olltlcal Science, B.S.. New York 

Universitv: A.M.. Ph.D., Princeton University. 
JENNINGS B. EDWARDS. JR. 

Instructor in Physical Education, B.S.. North Carolina Slate ColleKe: M.A.. Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 
HERBERT GARFIELD EI.DRIDGE. JR.. 

Instructor in English, B.A., M.A.. University of Pennsylvania. 
CFCIL DEAN ELLIOTT. 

.Assistant I'rofcsaor of Architecture, B.S.. B.Arch.. University of Oklahoma: M.Arch.. 

Harvard University. 
DON EDWIN ELLIS. 

Head of Plant Pathology and Professor of Plant Pathology, B.Sc. B.A.. Central 

ColleKe: M.S. Louisiana State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 



305 



MARVIN LEE ENGLISH. 

AasiMant I'rofcuHor in Mechanical Enuinecrina, B.S., South Dakota State College; 

M.S., University of Minnesota. 
JOHN LINCOLN ETCHELLS, 

I'rofcanor of Animal hiduntrii. Botany and Horticulture (Coop. USDA), B.S., M.S., 

Ph.D.. Michigan State CoUe^'e. 
H.\ROLD J. EVANS. 

AKMociatc I'rofenHor of Botany, B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky; Ph.D.. Rutirers 

University. 
JOHN LAWRENCE EVERS. 

AnKoriatc ProfcHsor of Zoology, B.A., Ph.D., University of Te.xas. 
RALPH EIGIL FADUM. 

Head of Department and Professor of Civil Engineerinc/, B.S.C.E., University of 

Illinois: M.S.E., S.D., Harvard University. 
EMIL ATWOOD FAILS, 

AHsistant Professor of Economics, B.S., Southwestern Institute of Technology, 

Okla.: M.A., Peabody College. 
VIRGIL MORING FAIRES, 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., M.S., M.E.. University of Colorado. 
A. G. FARKAS. 

Instructor of Ciril Engineering, B.S.C.E., WashinKton University, St. Louis Missouri. 
MAURICE HUGH FARRIER, 

Research Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S.. M.S.. Iowa State College. Ph.D., 

North Carolina State CoIleKC. 
BARTON ROBY FARTHIN(;. 

Research Instructor In Anitnal Industry, B.S., Wake Fore.st; B.S.. North Carolina 

State College. 
JAMES K. FERRELL. 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S., M.S., Ch.E., University of Missouri. 
L FERENCZI, 

Professor of Mineral Industries, Ph.D., Francis Joseph University, Kolozevar, 

Hungary. 
JAMES K. FERRELL, 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S., M.S. Ch.E., University of Missouri. 
ALVA LEROY FINKNER, 

Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics (Coop. USDA), B.S., Colorado 

A. and M.: M.S., Kansas State College; Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
HILHERT ADAM FISHER. 

Head of Department and Professor of Mathematics, M.S., North Carolina State 

College: Graduate, United States Naval Academy; Graduate. United States Sub- 
marine School; LL.D.. Lenoir-Rhyne College. 
JAMES WALTER FITTS. 

Head of Department and Professor of Soils, B.S., Nebraska State Teachers College; 

M.S.. University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
JACK FLEISCHER. 

.Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., University of Florida; M.S., 

North Carolina State College. 
HOMMER CLIFTON FOLKS. 

In Charge, Soils Instruction and Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S.. Oklahoma A. & M.; 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
LUKE ASTELL FORREST. 

Research As-nciatc in Soils and Soil Scientist (Coop. USDA), B.S.. M.S., 

University of Georgia. 
GARNET WOLSEY FORSTER, 

Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Economics, B.S., Cornell University: M.S., Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin. 
CHARLES IRVING FOSTER, 

Professor of Social Studies, B.A., Princeton University; M.A. Harvanl University. 
ALVIN MARCUS FOUNTAIN, 

Professor of English. B.E.. M.S., North Carolina State College: M..A.. Columbia 

University: Ph.D.. Peabody College. 
RAYMOND SPIVEY FOURAKER. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., A. and M. College of Texas; M.S.. Univer- 
sity of Texas. 
CLYDE BEN.SON FULMER, 

Instructor in Physics. B.S., Berry Colleiie: M.S., Emory University. 
BENTLEY HALL FULTON, 

Emeritus Professor of Entomology, B.A., Ohio State University; M.S.. Chicago 

University; Ph.D.. Iowa State College. 
MERRILL MASON GAKFNEY, 

.\ssistant Professor of E( onom'.cs, B.A.. Reed College; Ph.D.. University of California, 

Herkeley. 
JOHN HURGESS GAITHER, 

.Assistant Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
MONROE EVANS GARDNER. 

Head of Department and Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute. 



306 



ISADOKK ANOELO C.ARGARO, 

AnMiHtaiit I'roffKgor of Military Science auil TacticK, Major, Ordnance Corps, V. S. 

Army. 
HKNKY WII.nURN C.ARREN, 

AnHi^laiit I'rofcuHor of I'oultry Science, A.B., University of North Carolinii: U.S., 

North Carolina State College: M.S., Ph.D., Univei-sity of Maryland. 
MARTHA JOHNSON CARRKN. 

Inntrurtor in MalhcmaticK, A.B., University of North Carolina. 
JOHN HKRNARD C.ARTNER. JR., 

I'rofcHKor of Horticulture, U.S., Ohio State University: M.S.. Ph.D., Michigan 

State College. 
ROHKRT THEODORE CAST. 

HcMcarch Ansintant I'rofessor of Entomoloiiy, U.S., M.S., Ohio State University: Ph.D., 

Cornell University. 
WII.HEI.M F. C.AUSTER, 

I'rofcMHor of Electrical Engincerinfi, U.S., M.S., So.D., Dr. Hahil., University of 

Technology, Vienna. 
DAN UI.RICH GERSTEL, 

.{.inociatr I'rotcs.ior of Field Croi>x, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of California. 
EDWARD HIRc;ER CILRERT. 

lic.icarch .XHKOciatc, Department of Textile Research, and Rencarch Atmixtant I'ro- 

/(.-(.sor 111 Textiles, U.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
MATTHEW JAMES GILBERT. 

InMructor in Soils, B.S.. University of California, M.S.. North Carolina State Colleife. 
GEORGE WALLACE GILES. 

Head of Department and Professor of Agricultural Eni/ineerinfi, U.S., University of 

Nebraska: M.S., University of Missouri. 
EDWARD W ALKER GLAZENER, 

Head of Department and Professor of Poultry Science, U.S., North Carolina State 

College: M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
KARL BROWNING GLENN, 

Associate Professor of Electrical Eniiincerinii, B.E., M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
ALFRED JOHN GOETZE, 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Enyineerinfj, U.S., in E.E., Drexel Institute of 

Technolo^'y: M.Sc, North Carolina State Collefte. 
EUGENE FRIZELLE GOLDSTON, 

Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S.. North Carolina State CollcKe. 
LEMUEL GOODE, 

Assistant I'rofessor of Animal Industry, B.S.. M.S.. West Virginia University. 
JAMES WYCHE GREEN, 

.Assistant I'rofessor of Rural Sociology, U.S., M.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 

Ph.D., I'niversitv of North Carolina. 
RALPH BEAMON GREENE. 

Head .Mechanic, Department of Agricultural Enijinecrinii. 
JOHN HAYES GREGORY, 

Instructor of .Animal Industry, U.S., North Carolina State College. 
WALTON CARLYLE GREGORY. 

Professor of Field Crops. B.A., Lynchburg College: M.S.. Ph.D.. University of 

Virginia. 
CLAUDE DELBERT GRINNELS. 

I'rofessor of Animal Industry, U.S., M.S.. Univer.sity of Minnesota. D.V.M., Cornell 

University. 
DANIEL SWARTWOOD GROSCH. 

Associate Professor of Genetics, B.S., Moravian College: M.S., Lehigh Univei-sity; 

Ph.D.. I'niversity of Pennsylvania. 
ELLIOTT BROWN GROVER, 

Head of Department of Yam Manufacturing, School of Textiles, and Ahel C. 

I.inberiicr Professor of Yarn Processing, U.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
MARTIN CHANDLER GROWALD. 

Instructor in Architecture. B.S., in Architecture, University of Virginia: M.Arch.. 

Harvard University. 

(;eorge albert gullette. 

Head of Department and Professor of Social Studies, B.A.. Harvard I'ollege: M.A.. 

Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
ROY GUSSOW, 

.Assoc ate I'rofessor of Desiijn, B.S., Proiluct Design, Institute of Design. 
FRANK EDWIN GUTHRIE, 

.Assistant Ursearch Professor of Entomology, U.S., University of Kentucky: M.S. 

and Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
FRANK ARLING HAASIS. 

Research Professor of Plant Patholoinj, U.S., University of California: Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
W. C. HACKLER. 

Associate Professor of Mineral Industries, B.Cer.E.. M.S., Cer.E.. Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute; Ph.D.. North Carolina State College. 



307 



ROBERT JOHN HADER, 

Asaociate I'rofesnor of Experimented Statistics, B.S., University of Chicago; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
FREDERICK MORGAN HAIG. 

Profesitor of Animal Industry, B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., North Carolina 

State College. 
NATHAN SCOTT HALL. 

Professor of Soils, U.S., Rhode Island State College; M.A., University of Missouri; 

Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 
RUTH BADGER HALL. 

.Assistant Professor of Modern Languages, B.A., Oberlin College; M..\., University 

of North Carolina. 
•ERNEST MILTON HALLIDAY, 

.Assoriate Professor of Social Studies, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
DAME SCOTT HAMBY. 

Associate Profesor of Textiles, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
CHARLES HORACE HAMILTON, 

Head of Department and Professor of Rural Sociology, B.A., Southern Methodist 

University; M.S., Texas A. & M. College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
CLARENCE H. HANSON, 

Research Associate Professor of Field Crops (Coop. USD A), B.S., University of 

Minnesota; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
KARL P. HANSON, 

Head of Department and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., University of 

Wisconsin; M.S., University of Michigan. 
JOSEPH EARLTON HARDEE, 

Instructor in Engineering Mechanics, B.C.E., North Carolina State College. 
REINARD HARKEMA, 

Professor of Zoology, A.B., Calvin College; Ph.D., Duke University. 
SADIE JENKINS HARMON, 

Visiting Professor of English, A.B., B.M., Greensboro College; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina. 
CLEON WALLACE HARRELL, 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.A., M.A., University of Virginia. 
ANNA MAE HARRIS, 

.Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Virginia 
DONALD GIBSON HARRIS, 

Instructor in Soils, B.S., University of Vermont; M.S., North Carolina State College. 
MARY ELLEN HARRIS, 

Research Instructor, Institute of Statistics, A.B., Guilford College; M.S., North Caro- 
lina State College. 
EDGAR LEE HARRISBERGER, 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., University of Oklahoma; 

M.S.M.E., University of Colorado. 
CLARENCE A. HART. 

.Assistant Professor of Wood Tcchnologu. B.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., 

North Carolina Slate College. 
JOHN REGINALD HART, 

licscarrh .Assistant in Engineering Research, B.Cer.E., North Carolina State College. 
WILBUR HAYDEN HART, 

Instructor oj Industrial Engineering. 
LODWICK CHARLES HARTLEY, 

Head of Department and Professor of English, B.A., Furman University; M.A., 

Columbia University; Ph.D., Princeton University; Litt. D., Furman University. 
PAUL H. HARVEY, 

Head of Department and William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Field 

Crops, U.S.. University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Iowa State Colle;je. 
MOYLE E. HARWARD, 

lirscarch .Assistiint Professor of Agronomy, B.S., Brigham Young University; M.S., 

University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
FRANCIS JEFFERSON HASSLER, 

Assnriati- rrofrisor of .A'lr cultural Engineering, B.S., Univeisity of Missouri; M.S., 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
WILLIAM WALTON HASSLER, 

Assistant Professor in Zoology, B.S., M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D.. University of 

Tennessee. 
ROBERT OLIVER HATFIELD, 

Assistant Professor of Psychology, A.B., M.A., University of California. 
ARTHUR COURTNEY HAYES. 

Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry, Ph.D., Brown University; M.S., North 

Carolina State College. 
M. JOYCE HAYES, 

Part-time Instructor of Psychology, A.B., University of South Carolina; M.A., Uni- 
versity of South Carolina; M.A., Ohio State University. 



308 



KKANK l.I.OYD HAYNES. JR., 

■■[x-oriat,- frofessor of Horticulture. H.S., Alalmnm Polyteihni.- Institute; I'h D 
Cornell I'niversitv. ' 

NKD SPKUNT HAYS. 

TKDDy' THKODmrrHKl/^^^^ '"'^"'■' "^ ^^ '''' ''"'"''■ "•«• P'-'^te.lan Colle.e. 

AxHoriulc I'rofe^^or of Plant Vatholoay. U.S.. Southwestern Louisiana Institute; 

()IJV>n< R^HEDGEPETH ^^-^' ^'""^^ ^"'■"""" ^"*'* ^'""^''^• 

.U»iMa„t I'rofisHor of Air Science, First Lieutenant, U. S. Air Force- BS East 
t arolina ColleKe. ■' """"' 

KOHERT RAYMOND HENTZ, 

.W^foMt I'rofemor of Chemistry, R.S.. University of ChicaKo; Ph.D., University of 
Wot re Dame. 

C. ADDISON HICKMAN, 

Dean of the School of General Studies and I'rofcHnor of Economics HA MA Ph D 
State Universitv of Iowa. . • •, . ., .1^., 

WILLIAM NORWOOD HICKS, 

Head of Department and I'rofessor of Philosouhy and lielifiion, B.E. MS North 

CHaVS's HOr1^CP?hILL."^' °"'^ Universitv; M.A.. Oberlin College. 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science. B.S., Colorado A. & M. Collese; M.S., PhD 

Cornell C'nivei-sitv. ' 

ROBERT ELLIS HILLER, 

Research Assistant in Engineering Research, B.S., Clemson College; M S North 

Carolina State College. 
THOMAS IRA HINES, 

Head of Department and Professor of Industrial and Rural Recreation, HS North 

Carolina State Collette: M.A., University of North Carolina. 
LAWRENCE EARLE HINKLE, 

Professor of Modern Lan,,uai,cs, B.A.. University of Colora.lr.; M.A.. Columbia Uni- 
versity; D.S.es L., Dijon University. 
ROBERT C. HITCHINGS, 

Assistant Professor of Pulp and Paper Technology, B.S., New York State College 

of Forestry. 
GEORGE BURNHAM HOADLEY, 

Head of Department and Professor of Electrical Engineerino. B.S., Swarthmore 
ARTmm MA^ON g-^-i,M"-->'"-tt« Institute of Technology. 

Instructor in Physical Education. B.S., Wake Forest College; M.Ed., University of 
North Carolina. 
ELMER GEORGE HOEFER, 

JUUutrrLENTVNE HO^mSn"' ^"^"■"^^'■'""- ««• M.E., University of Wisconsin. 

Director Emeritus of the Division of Forestry, B.S.F.. M.F.. Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota. 
ABRAHAM HOLTZMAN. 

Assistant I'rofessor of History and Political Science, B.S., M.A., University of 
«I.^v^.^l'/".^"'" "' 1'°^ Angeles; M.A., Ph.D.. Harvard University. 
HENRY ALFRED HOMME, 

Associate J'rofesor of Agricultural Economics, B.A.. Augustana College; M.A., 

Michigan State College. 
DANIEL GOODMAN HORVITZ, 

■■^!y>oriate I'rofessor of Experimental Statistics. B.S., Massachusetts State College; 

I n.u., Iowa State College. 
IVAN HOSTETLER. 

f(K"''c"//'?,'"^""''"' "'"' '''■''/««'""■ of Industrial Arts, B.A . Hluffl.m College: M.A., 

""'" S'«te University; Ed.D., University of Mis.souri. 

K/KA LEWIS HOWELL. 

CoHege."' ''^"^'''""' "^ ■Uiricultural Engineer.ng, B.S., M.S.. North Carolina State 

ARVEL HUNTER. 

TH<(;v:;s iiARi^sSk'li^^vciiS^^-^ ^"'^'^-^''^^ ^■«- °»^'" «-- ^'"'-- 

;t:"in;;'strteTXg;'' ■'<"""•"""'• "«•• ^"•'"""' Pobtechmc Institute; M.S.. North 
WILLIAM PRENTISS INGRAM, JR., 

roc:er tn.Li'AtrjAc'KVF " "•^•' '^■^■' ^"--^^ ^■"■•"""" «^-'^ C""-- 

^^ri;^.:'No;;r'c^a^;/;na'Su;^lSe^"" "--''-"■ "-" ^'— " ^-'--'- '- ^- 

WILLIAM ADDISON JACKSON 

(;ERA7;D"BLA'rNE'';AM;s ''"'''• "'•• ^"■■"^" ^"'^-^""'^^ *••«• P"'"''- University. 

]^:'i^'D':';^::^:L{:i ^{i^^::;::'' ^'""•'"-"- «•«■• ^.S.. North Caronn. state Col- 



309 



HERMAN BROOKS JAMES. 

Hrad of Department and Professor of Agriculturai Economics, B.S., M.S., North 

Carolina State Collejre: Ph.D., Duke University. 
JOHN MITCHELL JENKINS, JR. 

Professor of Horticulture, B.S.. Clemson Agricultural Colle;;ce: M.S., Louisiana State 

University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
CHARLES WARREN JENNINGS, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.S., University of Toledo; M.S., University of 

California: Ph.D., Duke University. 
ELMER HUBERT JOHNSON, 

Assoc, atr Professor of Sociolotju, B..\., M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
E. SIC.URD JOHNSON, 

Professor of Furniture Manufacturlnii and Manafjcmcnt, B.S., Syracuse University; 

M.F., Duke University. 
JOSEPH CLYDE JOHNSON, 

Assistant Professor of Paycholot/y, B.S., State Teachers Colletre (Troy, Ala.); M..^., 

Eil.D.. Peabody College. 
GEORGE DENVER JONES, 

Extension Professor of Entomology, B.S., and M.A., University of Missouri. 
GUY LANGSTON. JONES. 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota. 
IVAN DUNLAVY JONES, 

Professor of Horticulture, A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; Ph.D.. University of 

Minnesota. 
EDGAR WILLIAMSON JORDAN, 

Instructor in Physical Education, B.A., University of Richmond; M.Ed., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 
WALTER EDWARD JORDAN, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.S.. M.A., Wake Forest College; M.S., North Caro- 
lina State College. 
CHARLES HOWARD KAHN, 

Instructor in Civil Ennineeriny, A.B., Math., University of North Carolina; B.C.E., 

North Carolina State College; M.S. Struc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
HENRY LEVEKE KAMPHOEFNER, 

Oean of School of Design, B.S., Arch.. University of Illinois; M.S.. Arch.. Columbia 

University. 
EUGENE JOHN KAMPRATH. 

Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., University of Nebraska. Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College. 
DWIGHT LEROY KASTER. 

histuctor in Soils, B.S.Agri., University of Nebraska. 
HAROLD KEATING, 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. B.S., M.Ed.. Springfield College. 
CHARLES RAY KELLEY. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology, B.A., University of Hawaii; M.A., Ohio State 

University. 
JOSEPH WHEELER KELLEY, 

Associate Professor of Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
ARTHUR KELMAN, 

Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Rhode Island State College; M.S., Ph.D., 

North Carolina State College. 
JOHN FAWCETT KENFIELD 

Asistant Professor of Physical Education, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
HENDERSON GRADY KINCHELOE, 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., University of Richmond; M.A., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Ph.D.. Duke University. 
RICHARD ADAMS KING. 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., University of Connecticut; 

M.S., University of Cailfornia; M.P A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
ROSA DEANS KIRBY, 

Ucsenrch Associate, Department of Textile Research and Research Instructor, De- 

jiartmnnt of Textile Chemistry, B.S., Meredith College. 
JAMES BRYANT KIRKLAND, 

Dean of School of Education and Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S.Agri., 

M.S., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
JAMES WARNER KLIBBE, 

Assistant Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
GLENN CHARLES KLINGMAN, 

I'rofessor of Field Crops, B.S.. University of Nebraska: M.S., Kansas State College; 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
RICHARD BENNETT KNIGHT, 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., University 

of Illinois. 
ALBERT SIDNEY KNOWLES, JR.. 

Instructor in English, B.A.. M.A.. University of Virginia. 

310 



CHARLES FREDERICK KOLB. 

Anxixtanl l'ro}i»Hitr of HiMortj and I'olitical Science, U.A., Drury College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 
BENJAMIN GRANADE KOONCE. JR.. 

Itintructor in Knijiish, A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM WURTH KRIEGEL, 

Frofegsor of Ceratnic Enyineerinti, B.S.C.E., B.S.Cer.E., University of Washintr- 

ton: M.S., Montana School of Mines; Dr. InK., Tescnische Hochschule, Hanover. 
WALTER MICHAEL KULASH. 

Associate I'rofessor of Kntomolo<JU. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts State College. 
LINCOLN FILENE LADD, 

Inntructor in English. A.B., Brown University: M.A., University of Viminia. 
ARTHUR IRISH LADU. 

I'rofcusor of English, B.A., Syracuse University: M.A., Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina. 
CLAUDE MILTON LAMBE, 

Assistant Professor of Civil Enginccri)ta, U.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN RALPH LAMBERT, JR., 

.A.isociatc Professor of Social Studies, A.B., Western Maryland ColleKc; M.A.. Ph.D., 

Princeton Universitv. 
JOHN HAROLD LAMPE, 

Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., 

M.S., Dr.Eng., Johns Hopkins University. 
FORREST WESLEY LANCASTER, 

Professor of Physics, B.S.Ch.E., M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Duke University. 
JAMES GIACOMO LECCE, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.A., Dartmouth College; M.S., Pennsylvania 

State College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
THOMAS BENSON LEDBETTER, 

As.iistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering, B.M.E., M.S., North Carolina Slate 

Colle;ie. 
JOHN FRANCIS LEE, 

Profcs.->or of Mechanical Engineering. B.S., The Citadel: M.S., Harvard University. 
WILLIAM DANIEL LEE, 

Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JAMES EDWARD LEGATES, 

Acting Head of Dairy Husbartdry Section and William XeaJ Reynolds Distinguished 

Professor of Field Crops and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., University of 

Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
SAMUEL GEORGE LEHMAN, 

Emeritus Profissitr of Plant Pathology. B.S., Ohio University: MS.. North Carolina 

State College; Ph.D.. Washington University. 
SARAH McCULLOH LEMMON. 

l.irturrr in History and Political Science, B.A., Ma<lison College: M.A., Columbia 

University: Ph. D.. University of North Carolina. 
PAUL BONAR LEONARD, 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., Ohio State University: M.A., 

Universitv of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM RUSSELL LEONHARDT, 

Instructor in Physical Education. B.S., Springfield College, M.S.. University of 

Illinois. 
JACK LEVINE. 

Professor of Mathematics. B.A., L^niversity of California; Ph.D., Princeton University. 
CHARLES FREDERICK LEWIS. 

.Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.S., Tennesse State College: M.A., Peabody 

College. 
JOHN GARY LEWIS, 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
MALCOLM LEWIS. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technoloiry. 
PAUL E. LEWIS. 

Associate Professor of .Mathematics, B.S., Northeastern Oklahoma State College: 

M.S., Oklahoma A. & M.. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
QUENTON McALPlNK I.KWi^. 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Captain, U. S. Air Force, B.S., North Carolina 

State College. 
RICHARD CHARLES LEWONTIN, 

Assistant Professor of Genetics. B.A., Harvard University: M.S., Ph.D., Columbia 

University. 
CLARENCE EARL LIBBY, 

Reuben B. Robertson Professor of Pulp and Paper Technology. B.S.. Ch.E.. Univer- 
sity of Maine. 



311 



QUKNTIN WILLIAM LINDSEY. 

Hcacarili ABsociate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., M.A., University of 

Nebraska. 
CHAKLES HOWIE LITTLE. JR., 

AxsiMant I'rofcHsor of Mathematics, B..-\., Davidson ColleKe; M.A., University of 

North Carolina. 
JAMES HENRY LITTLE. IV. 

Instructor in Physical Education, B.E., Central Michigan ColleKe. 
ROBERT WARREN LLEWELLYN, 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering, B.S.E.E., Union ColleKe; M.S. I.E., 

Purdue University. 
RICHARD HENRY LOEPPERT, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, B.S., Northwestern L'niversity; Ph.D., University 

of Minnesota. 
LEONARD WOOD LONG. 

Associate Professor of Engineeriiig Mechanics, B.E.E.. M.S.E.E.. North Carolina 

State ColleKe. 
WREAL LESTER LOTT, 

Professor of Chemistry, A.B.. BriKham YounK University; Ph.D.. Cornell University. 
RAY LEE LOVVORN. 

Acting Director of Rcsearcli for the School of Agriculture and Professor of Field 

Crops, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.S., University of Missouri; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin. 
SHELDON GAYLON LOWRY. 

Assistant Professor of Rural Sociology, .\.B., BriKham VounK University; M.S.. Ph.D., 

MichiKan State College. 
GEORGE BLANCHARD LUCAS, 

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., Pennsylvania State ColleKe; M.S.. Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University. 
HENRY LAWRENCE LUCAS. JR.. 

Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S.. University of California; Ph.D.. Cornell 

University. 
ARTHUR EDWARD LUCIER. 

Research Assistant in Engineering Research, B.Cer.E.. M.S., North Carolina State 

ColleKe. 
JOSEPH GIDEON LUNDHOLM, 

Research Associate in I'hysics, B.S., M.S., Kansas State CoUe^re. 
JAMES FULTON LUTZ. 

Professor of Soils, B.S., North Carolina State ColleKe; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Missouri. 
JOSEPH THOMAS LYNN. 

Assistant Professor of Physics, B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.S., Ohio State 

University. 
JAMES BROOKS LYON, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Ma.ior, Quatermaster Corps, 

U. S. Army, B.S., Cornell; Command and General Staff Collese. 
JAMES A. LYONS. 

Associate Professor of Economics, B.S., Cornell University; LL.B., Vanderbilt 

University; M.A.. Ph.D.. State University of Iowa. 
ROBERT ALLEN McALLISTER, 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.Ch.E.. North Carolina State College; 

M.S., University of Wisconsin; S.M., Massachusetts Institute of TechnoloKy; Ph.D., 

GeorKia Institute of TechnoloKy. 
STANLEY BERT McCALEB. 

Associate Professor of Soils, U.S.. University of California; M.S.. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University. 
CHARLES BERNARD McCANTS 

Assistant Professor of Soils, B.S.. M.S., North Carolina State Colle.:re; Ph.D.. Iowa 

State College. 
ANDREW COLIN McCLUNG. 

Research Associate Professor of Soils, B.S.. We-it Virginia University; M.S., 

Ph.D.. Cornell University. 
CLARENCE LESLIE McCOMBS, 

Instructor in Horticulture, B.S., M.S., Ohio State University. 
JOSEPH ANDREW McCULLOCH, 

Assistant Professor of Military Srence and Tueties. Lieutenant Colonel. Infantry. 

U. S. Army, B.S., U. S. Military Academy. 
CHARLES RUSSELL McCULLOUGH, 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineerinti, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E.. Purdue University. 
JOHN WILLIAM McCULLOUGH. 

Assistant Professor of English, B.A., Wofford College; M.A., University of Georgia; 

Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 
HII.I.IARD BUNNY McCULLOUGH. 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Major, U. S. Air Force, B.A., Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity. 



312 



WILLIAM McC.EHEE. 

Vitiiting I'rofenor of Psychology, B.S., University of the South: M.A., Ph.D., 

PenUiily Collepe. 
ALAN HRIDGEMAN MaclNTYRE. 

Kenearrh Ansociate in Engineering Research, B.S.E.E., North Carolina Stale ColleRe. 
ANf.l'S KEITH FEKCl'SON McKEAN. 

Professor of Social Studies, B.A., Williams College: M.A., LIniversity of Chicago; 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
MURPHY CRADY McKENZlE. 

lirsiarch Instructor in Auronomy, B.S., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
FOIL WILLIAM McLAUGHLIN. 

Hrstarch Assistant Professor of Agronomy, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
HARRY KINC. McMILLAN, 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, B.S.M.E., University of South Carolina. 
JOHN JOSEPH McNEILL. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
WOODROW WILSON McPHERSON, 

Professor of Agricultural f^conomics, B.S.. North Carolina State ColleKe; M.S., 

Louisiana State University: Ph.D., Harvard University. 
GUY PORCHER McSWEENEY, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Captain, U. S. Air Force, B.A., The Citadel. 
T. EWALD MAKI, 

Cart Ahvin Schcnck Distinguished Professor of Forest Management, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 

I'niversity of Minnesota. 
GRAHAM DENT MANGUM, JR.. 

Manager, Processing Research Division, Department of Textile Research and Re- 
search Instructor in Textiles: B.S., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
CARROLL LAMB MANN, 

Professor Emeritus of Civil Enginecrinii, B.S., C.E., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
CARROLL LAMB MANN. JR., 

Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S.C.E., North Carolina State ColleKe: C.E., 

Princeton University. 
THURSTON JEFFERSON MANN. 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State Collese: Ph.D.. Cornell 

Univei-sity 
EDWARD GEORGE MANNING, 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S.E.E., LeiKh University: M.S., 

North Carolina State ColleKe. 
OLEN FRANKLIN MARKS, 

Research Associate, Department of Textile Research and Research As^oc'ate Pro- 
fessor in Textiles Lowell Textile Institute. 
ARTHUR ROSS MARSHALL, 

Instructor in Mathematics, A.B., Mississippi College; A.M., Columbia University. 
ROGER POWELL MARSHALL, 

Professor of English, B.A.. Wake Forest Collejre; M.A., Columbia University: M.S., 

North Carolina State College. 
GRADY ALLEN MARTIN. 

Instructor in Poultry Science, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
LEE ROY MARTIN, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.A., University of Arkansas; A.M., 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
THOMAS JACKSON MARTIN, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.E., M.S., North Carolina State 

ColleKe. 
THOMAS ANTON MARTINSEK, 

Instructor in Economics, B.A., Western Reserve University; M.A.. Ohio State 

University. 
DAVID DICKENSON MASON, 

Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.A., King College; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute: Ph.D.. North Carolina State CoUckc. 
GENNARD MATRONE, 

Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., Cornell University: Ph.D.. North Carolina 

State ColleKe. 
GEORGE MATSUMOTO. 

Associate Professor of Architecture, B.A., Washington University, St. Louis; M.A., 

Cranbrook Academy of Art, Michigan. 
JACKSON RAMSAUR MAUNEY, 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops (Coop. USDA), B.S., Iowa State CuIleKe: 

M.S.. Ph.D.. I'niversity of Wisconsin. 
SELZ CABOT MAYO. 

Professor of Rural Sociology, A.B., Atlantic Christian College: M.S.. North Carolina 

State College; Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 
JEFFERSON SULLIVAN MEARES, 

Professor of Physics, B.S., University of South Carolina; M.S., North Carolina 

State College. 
ADOLPH MEHLICH, 

Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S.. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



313 



Unievrsity of North Carolina. 



M.E.Math., North Carolina 



M.S.. Ph.D.. Cornell 



B.D.. 



Yale University. 
. North Carolina 



.ARTHUR CLAYTON MENIUS. JR., 

f'rofcssor of Physics. B.A., Catawba College; Ph.D. 
RICHARD RALPH MIDDLEBROOKS. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Colonel, Infantry, U. S. Army; B.S., 

U. S. Military Academy, Command and General Staff College, Armed Forces Staff 

College. Industrial College of the Armed Forces. 
GEORGE WASHINGTON MIDDLETON, 

Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S. 

State College. 
GORDON KENNEDY MIDDLETON. 

Professor of Field Crops, B.S.. North Carolina State Colle;j 

University. 
HENRY MOORE MIDDLETON. JR., 

Assistant Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOSEPH LEONARD MIDDLETON, 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion, B.A., Wake Forest College. 

Crozer Theological Seminary; M.A.. Columbia University. 
EDWIN LAWRENCE MILLER. JR. 

Associate Profe-isor of Mineral Industries, B.S.. E.M.. Missouri School of Mines and 

Metallurgy; M.S., North Carolina State Collese. 
EILIF V. MILLER, 

Associate Professor of Agronomy, B.A., Carleton College: M.S., University of Minne- 
sota: Ph.D., Cornell University. 
JOHN FLETCHER MILLER, 

Special Lecturer in Physical Education, B.Pd., Central Missouri Teachers' College: 

B.P.E.. Springfield College. 
LATHAM L. MILLER, 

Associate Professor of Industrial and Rural Recreation, B-.A.. Wake Forest College; 

M.A., University of North Carolina. 
PHILIP ARTHUR MILLER, 

Research Associate Professor of Field Crops (Coop. USDA), B.S., M.S., University 

of Nebraska; Ph.D.. Iowa State College. 
WILLIAM DYKSTRA MILLER, 

Associate Professor of Silviculture, B.A., Reed College; M.F., Ph.D., 
CHARLES RUDOLPH MILTON, 

Instructor in Psychology, A.B., University of North Carolina; M.S. 

State College. 
BASIL ILLARION MISHTOWT, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Lieutenant Colonel, Infantry, 

U. S. Army, B.S., University of Maryland, Command and General Staff College. 
WALTER JOSEPH MISTRIC, JR. 

Research Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., 

Ph.D.. A. & M. Collecre of Texas. 
ADOLPHUS MITCHELL, 

Professor of Engineering Mechanics, B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., 

Carolina. 
THEODORE BERTIS MITCHELL, 

Professor of Entomology, B.S., Massachusetts State College: 

State College; D.S., Harvard University. 
RICHARD DOUGLAS MOCHRIE, 

Instructor in Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., University of Connecticut. 
REUBEN O. MOEN, 

Professor of Economics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 
DANNIE JOSEPH MOFFIE, 

Head of Department and Professor of Psychology, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

State College. 
R. B. MOFFITT, 

Instructor in Mineral Industries. B.Geol.E., North Carolina State College. 
ROBERT JAMES MONROE, 

Professor of ET]i<rimcntal Statistics, B.S.. Iowa State College; Ph.D.. North Carolina 

State Collei'e. 
WILLIS ELVIS MOODY. JR., 

Instructor in Ceramic Engineering, B.Cer.E., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
EKMER LEON MOORE, 

Research Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology (Coop. USDA), B.S.A., M.S., 

University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
FRANK HARPER MOORE. 

Instructor in English, A.B., University of Florida: M.A.. Ph.D.. University of 

North Carolina. 
JAMES LEGRAND MOORE. 

Research Assistant Professor of Animal Industry. B.S.Ch., Hampden-Sydnev College; 

U.S.. M.S.. North Carolina State College. 
ROBERT PARKER MOORE. 

Research Professor of Field Crops, B.S.. Oklahoma A. & M. College; M.S.. Iowa State 

College; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 



University of North 



M.S., North Carolina 



Pennsylvania 



314 



PEKRY KARL MOOSE, 

Asutxintc I'rofinnoT of Mcrhaiiical Knyinefrinii, U.S., Ntulh Carolina State ColleKC; 

M.S., Purdue University. 
DON.ALD EDWIN MORELAND, 

Htmarch AaHiatattt I'rofcsHor of Field Cropx (Cooji. VSDA), U.S., M.S., Ph.D., North 

Carolina State ColIeKe. 
JOHN WESLEY MORGAN. 

Itintruftor in Cliemigtri), A.H., M.A., Duke Univer.sity. 
EMMETT RROWN MORROW, 

Agsociatc Professor of Hortiriiltitre, K.S., North Carolina State Collette: M.S., Uni- 
versity of California. 
WILLIAM EDWIN MOSER, 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State Colleue. 
CARL CALVIN MOSES, 

I'art-tiiiK- hi strut- tor. History and Political Scienre. B.A., College of William and 

Marv; M.A.. I'niversity of North Carolina. 
HAROLD MOTT, 

Instructor in FAcctrical Enijineerinf/, B.Sc, M.Sc, North Carolina State ColIeKe. 
CAREY GARDNER MUMFORD, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Wake Forest ColIeKe: M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 
W. RAY MURLEY, 

Associate Professor of Animal Industnj, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State ColIeKe. 
FRANK J. MURRAY, 

Instructor in Physical Education, A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 
RAYMOND LEROY MURRAY, 

Professor of Physics, B.S., M.A., University of Nebraska: Ph.D., University of 

Tennessee. 
RICHARD MONIER MYERS, 

Intructor in Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State CoUcRe. 
HOWARD M. NAHIKIAN, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
THOMAS LEWIS NASH, 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineerino, B.S., U. S. Naval Academy. 
J. A. NATTRESS, 

Assistant Professor of Industrial Knpineeritip, B.S., M.S., GeorKJa Institute of 

TechonoloKy. 
NELSON LEONARD NEMEROW, 

Associate Professor of Civil Eniiineerinfi, B.S.Ch.E., Syracuse University: M.S., 

Ph.D., RutKers University. 
WILLIAM ANDREWS NEWELL. 

Research Coordinator, School of Textiles, and Professor of Textiles, B.S., North 

Carolina State ColIeKe. 
LOWELL WENDELL NIELSON, 

Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., Utah State .AKricultural ColIeKe: Ph.D., 

Cornell University. 
STUART MCGUIRE NOBLIN, 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, A.B., Davidson ColIeKe: A.M., 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
ARNOLD NOLSTAD, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.A., Duther ColIeKe; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of PittsbuTKh. 
VICTOR LOUIS NUNENKAMP, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, Captain, U. S. Air Force, B.F., OreKon State 

CollCKC. 

CHARLES JOSEPH NUSBAUM. 

Professor and William \eal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Pla)it Pathology, 

U.S.. OrcKon State College: M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
FELIX ALEXANDER NYLUND, 

Research Associate Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S., M.S., University of 

Minne.sota: Ph.D., Cornell University. 
GE0R(;E MOTLEY OLIVER. 

Instructor in Chemistry, A.B., M.S., University of North Carolina. 
BERNARD MARTIN OLSEN, 

Assistant Professor of Economics, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of ChicaKO. 
JAMES REGINALD OSBORN. 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, 1st Lieutenant, U. S. Air Force; B.A., University 

of Maryland. 
JOHN CLARK OSBORNE, 

Head, \'etcrinary Section and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., VirKinia Polytechnic 

Institute: M.S., University of Maine: D.V.M.. MichiKan State ColIeKe. 
EDWIN HITGH PAGET, 

Associate Professor of En'ilsh, B.L., Northwe<tern: M.A., University of PittsburKh. 
JAMES EDWIN PARDUE, 

Assistant Professor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State ColIeKe. 
HUBERT VERN PARK, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.A., I.cnoir-Rhyne Colle/e: M.A.. Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina. 



315 



BLAINE FRANK PARKER. 

Annixtant I'rofcssor of Apricullural Engineering, B.S.M.S., Viririnia Polytechnic 

Institute: Ph.D.. Michigan State College. 
JAMES SCOTT PARKER, 

AfHititant I'rofcHsor of Textiles, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN MASON PARKER, III, 

ProfcHMor of Geology, B.A., A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University. 
MATTIE ERMA PARKER, 

Part-time Inntructor of Histor-u and Political Science, B. A., Woman's College of 

University of North Carolina; M.A., University of North Carolina. 
CARLOTTA PETERSON PATTON, 

hi:<tructor in Mathematics, B.S., College of Charleston. 
JEHU DEWITT PAULSON, 

Professor of Drawing, B.F.A., Yale University. 
ROBERT JAMES PEARSALL, 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineerina, B.E., North Carolina State College, 
LEE HOMER PERSON, 

Associate Research Professor of Plant Pathology (Coop. USDA), B.S., Mississippi 

A. and M.; M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
DANIEL MCLEOD PETERSON, 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, B.A., University of Mississippi: M.A., Duke 

University. 
WALTER JOHN PETERSON, 

Head of Department of Chemistry and William Neal Reynolds Distingtiished Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Chemistry, B.S., M.S., Michigan State College: Ph.D., State 

University of Iowa. 
HOWARD ALDRIDGE PETREA, 

Assistant Professor in Mathematics, B.S., Guilford College: M.A., University of North 

Carolina. 
LYLE LLEWELLYN PHILLIPS, 

Assistant Professor of Field Crops, B.A., Redlands University: M.A., Claremont 

College: Ph.D., University of Washington. 
WALTER HENRY PIERCE, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., North Carolina State College: 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
FREDERICK PHILIPS PIKE. 

Professor of Chemical Engineering, B.S.Ch.E., University of Virginia: S.M., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
VALENTIN ADOLF PIKNER. 

Assistant Professor of Economics, Dipl-Kaufm., Ph.D., University of Frankfurt. 
JAMES RODNEY PILAND, 

Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., Wake Forest College: M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
ROBERT MCLEAN PINKERTON, 

Professor of Aeronautical Engineering, B.S., Bradley University. 
CHARLES ANDREWS PLANK, 

Instructor in Chemical Engineering, B.Ch.E., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN PATE POINTER, 

Instructor in Soils, B.S., Tennessee Polytechnic Institute: M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 

georc;e waverly Poland, 

Acting Head of Di/xirtmcnt and Profetsor of Modern Languages, B.A., Collese of 

William and Mary: M.A., Brown University: Diploma, Universidad de Salamanca; 

Ph.D., I'niversity of North Carolina. 
DANIEL TOWNSEND POPE, 

Associate Professor of Horticulture, B.S., Clemson College: M.S., Louisiana State 

University: Ph.D., Cornell University. 
JOSEPH ALEXANDER PORTER, JR., 

Associate Professor of Textiles, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN WILLIAM POU, 

Hcail of Department and Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., North Carolina State 

College: M.S.. University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
RICHARD JOSEPH PRESTON, 

Profrssor of Forestry and Dean of tic School of Forestry, B.A., M.S.F., Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Michii'an. 
GEORGE FOSTER PROVOST, 

Instructor in English, B.S., Louisiana State University: M.A., University of Oregon; 

Ph.D., University of Louisiana. 
HOYLE BROOKS PUCKETT, 

Agent (Agricultural Engineer), VSDA, B.S., University of Georgia: M.S., Michigan 

State College. 
THOMAS LAVELLE QUAY, 

Associate Professor of Zoology, B.S., University of Arkansas; M.S., Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College. 



316 



ROBERT LAMAR RABB, 

KcKcarch Assistant Professor of Entomoloiiy, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 

State College. 
GLENN ORVICE RANDALL, 

Professor of Horticulture. B.S., University of Arkansa.s; M.S., Iowa State ColleKe. 
GASTON MEARES RANDOLPH, 

Research Associate, Department of Textile Research, and Research Instructor, De- 
partment of Textile Chemistry, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
HAL DENISON RANDOLPH. 

Instructor in Electrical F.nginecrinf), B.Sc. in E.E., University of Miami: M.Sc. in 

K.E., University of Florida. 
WILLIAM HOITSTON RANKIN, 

Associate Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State Colletre. 
CHARLES BRICE RATCHFORD, 

Assistant Director of Afjricultural Extension Service and Professor of Agricultural 

Economics. U.S., M.S., North Carolina State ColleKe, Ph.D., Duke University. 
HORACE DAKR RAWLS. 

Assistant Professor of Sociolopy, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State Collette. 
ROBERT BURRETT REDFERN, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., Clemson ColleKe; M.S.. Ph.D., North 

Carolina State College. 
PRESTON HARDING REID. 

Instructor in Soils, B.S., Colorado A. & M., M.S., North Carolina State Collette. 
WILLIS ALTON REID. 

Professor of Chemistry, B.S., Wake Forest Colleiire; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
CLAUDE LITTLE RHYNE, JR.. 

Research Asisstant Professor of Field Crops (Coop. VSDA), B.S., University of 

Georvfia: Ph.D., North Carolina State ColleKe. 
JOHN EARL RICE. 

Professor of Aqronomy Director North Carolina Crop Improvement Association, 

B.S.. M.S.. Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
PHILIP MORRISON RICE. 

.Xssociatc Professor of History and Political Science. B.A., Pomona Collejte; M.A., 

Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 
ROBERT BARTON RICE, 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., Tufts College; A.M., Columbia Univer- 
sity; M.E.. Tufts College. 
VICTOR ARTHUR RICE, 

Acting Director of Instruction for School of Agriculture. B.S., North Carolina State 

College; M.S., University of Massachusetts; D. Agriculture, North Carolina State 

College. 
FRANCES MARIAN RICHARDSON. 

Research Associate in Engineering Research, B.S., Roanoke College; M.S., Unviersity 

of Cincinnati. 
WILLIAM JOSEPH RIECK, JR., 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Captain, .\rtillerv. U. S. Army. 
JACKSON ASHCRAFT RIGNEY, 

Head of Department and Professor of Experimental Statistics. B.S., New Mexico 

State College; M.S.. Iowa State College. 
ROBERT L. RINGLER, 

Research Assistant Professor of Chemistry. A.B., Central Michigan College; Ph.D., 

Michigan State University. 
JAMES FRANKLIN RISHER, JR., 

Professor of Air Science. Colonel, U. S. Air Force. B.A., The Citadel: M..\., Univer- 
sity of South Carolina. 
WILLIAM MILNER ROBERTS, 

Heatl, Dairy Manufacturing Section and Professor of Animal Industry. B.S.A., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee: M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
COWIN COOK ROBINSON, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. B.A., Sterling College, Kansas; M.A., University 

of Kansas: Ph D.. Uni»'ersity of Wisconsin. 
HAROLD FRANK ROBINSON, 

Professor of Experimental Statistiee, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; 

Ph.D.. Nebraska University. 
HENRY MITCHELL ROSENBERG, 

Instructor in English, A.B., University of West Virginia; M.A., University of 

North Carolina. 
SAMUEL ROSENBERG, 

Associate Professor of Design, studie<l at New York Institute of Photography. 
ROBERT ROZETT. 

Instructor in Chemical Engineering, B.S., and M.S. in Cheni. Kngr. Columbia 

University. 
DONALD JACOB RULFS. 

Associatr Professor of English, B.A., University of North Carcilinn; M. A.. Harvard 

University; Ph.D., Llniversity of North Carolina. 
PAUL JAMES RltST, 

Assistant Professor of English and Psychology, B.A.. M.A., University of Idaho; 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 

317 



HENRY AMES RUTHERFORD. 

Head, Department of Textile Chemistry, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Director 
of Chemical Research, B.S., Davis and Elkins College; M.A., GeorRe Washington 
University. 
JOSEPH NEAL SASSER, 

Associate Professor of Plant Patholof/y, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; 
Ph.D., Univei-sitv of Maryland. 
GEORGE HOWARD SATTERFIELD, 

Professor of Chemistry, A.B., M.A., Duke University; B.S., North Carolina State 
College. 
CLARENCE CAYCE SCARBOROUGH, 

Head of Department and Professor of Agricultural Education, B.S.. M.S.. .Mabama 
Polytechnic Institute; Ed.M., Ed.D.. University of Illinois. 
MARSHALL LANGDON SCHMITT, 

Associate Professor of Industrial Arts, B.S., State University of New York; M.A., 
Ohio State University; Ed.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
GEORGE WILLIAM SCHNEIDER. 

Professor of Horticulture, B.S., M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D.. Rutgers Uni- 
versity. 
EDWARD MARTIN SCHOENBORN. JR. 

Head of Department and Professor of Chemical F.niiinccriiiti, B.Ch.E.. M.S., Ph.D.. 
Ohio State University. 
HERBERT TEMPLE SCOFIELD. 

Head of Botany Faculty and Professor of Botani/, A.B., Ph.D., Cornell University. 
HARRY ELDON SCOTT. 

Extension Assistant Professor of Entomoloffy, B.S.A.. Ontario Agricultural Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
LOUIS WALTER SEEGERS, 

Associate Professor of History and Political Science, B.A., Muhlent-erg Colle.;?e; 
A.M., University of Pennsylvania. 
JOHN FRANK SEELY, 

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineerinfi, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State 
College. 
HAROLD RAYMOND SELFRIDGE, 

Assistant Professor of Air Science, 1st Lieutenant U. S. Air Force, B.S., Clemson 
A & M College. 
JAMES ATKINS SHACKFORD, 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., Emeroy and Henry College: M.A.. Peabody 
College; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
ALFRED BERNARD ROWLAND SHELLEY, 

Associate Professor of English, B.S., Tufts College; M.A., Harvard Univesity. 
W1I>LIAM EDWARD SHINN, 

Head of Department of Knitting Technology and Chester H. Roth Professor of 
Knitting Tcchnoloqy, School of Textiles, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College. 
JOHN WILLIAM SHIRLEY, 

Dean of the Faculti/ and Professor of English, B.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 
ROBERT WORTH SHOFFNER, 

Assistant Director of Agricultural Extension Service, B.S., North Carolina State 
College. 
MERLE FRANKLIN SHOWALTER, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, A.B., Indiana Universitv; M.S.. Purdue University. 
CLARENCE BONNER SHULENBERGER, 

Professor of Economics, B.A., Roanoke College; M.A., Columbia University. 
ROSS SHUMAKER, 

Professor of Architecture, B.Arch., Ohio State University; Registered Architect. 
RAYMOND OLIN SIMMONS. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Purdue Universitv. 
CALVIN BRUCE SKOTLAND, 

Assistant Research Professor of Plant Pathology (Cooji. USDA). U.S., Utah State 
College; Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 
FREDERICK SILER SLOAN. 

Professor of Extension Studies and Training, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
GE0RC;E KELLOfIG SLOCUM, 

Professor of Forestry, B.S ..M.S., North Carolina State College. 
CHARLES SMALLWOOD, JR.. 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S.,San.Eng., Case Institute of Tech- 
nology; M.S., Harvard University. 
WILLIAM WESLEY (;ARRY SMART. JR.. 

Research Assistant Professor of Animal Industry and Experimental Statistics. 
B.S.. Clemson College; M.S.. Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 
BENJAMIN WARFIELD SMITH. 

Associate Professor of Genetics, B.A.. M.A., University of Virginia: Ph.. University 
of Wisconsin. 
CLYDE FURIMAN SMITH, 

Head of Entomology Faculty and Professor of EntomoUxni, B.S., M.S., I'tah State 
Agricultural College; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 



318 



FRANK HOUSTON SMITH. 

Resfarrh Afmoclatc /'r«/«'.Hnor of Anitttal Ititluxtrii, H.S., Davi<ls()n Colle'ie: M.S., 

North Cnrolina State College. 
GKt)K<;K W.M.l.ACK SMITH. 

Hi'ikI of licpartmeni and I'rofenHor of Enyinccriuii Mrchaiiirn, U.S.K.K., University 

of North Carolina: M.S.E.C.E., D.Sc, University of MichiKaii. 
HUCH FAIKFIKLD SMITH. 

I'rofrnKor of Kxvcrimcntal Statixtica, B.S., Erlinbuir University; M.S. A., Cornell 

I'niversity. 
NORWOOD GRAHAM SMITH. 

Iii.itrui-tnr ill Knnlish, A.B., Duke Universitv. 
WILLIAM KDWARD SMITH. 

Asuistant I'rofvKKor of Textiles. B.S.. North Carolina State College. 
WILLIAM KDWAKD SMITH, 
Assistant I'rofcKsor of I'hyxical Education, U.S.. Western Carolina Te.ichers CoIIeue; 

M.A., I'niversity of North Carloina. 
Rl'FUS HUMMER SNYDER, 

I'rofcs.ior of I'hysicit, B.S., Lebanon Valley Collene; A.M., Columbia University; 

Ph.D.. Ohio State University. 
ALLEN RALPH SOLEM, 

Director of Bureau of Industrial Psychology Services and Assistant I'rofcunor of 

J'siicholofi!/, B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Wayne University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michipan. 
MARVIN LUTHER SPECK. 

I'rofcHsor of Animal Indiintrij, R.S.. M.S.. University of Marylaml; Ph.D.. Cornell 

University. 
HERBERT E. SPEECE. 

Inatructor in Mathematics, B.A. York Collece; M.A. Texas Christian University; 

M.S.. North Carolina State Colletre. 
WILLIAM ELDON SPLINTER. 

Research Associate Professor of Ayricultural Engineerinfi, B.S., University of 

Nebraska: M.S.. MichiKan State ColleBe, Ph.D., Michiean State University. 
HANS HEINRICH STADELMAIER. 

Research Associate Professor of Metulhirf/y, Diplom-Physiker. Technische Hochshule, 
Stuttirart. 
RAYMOND FRANKLIN STAINBACK. 

Associate Professor of Physics, B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM ARCHIBALD STEPHEN. 

Assistant Professor of Entomolotiy, B.S., Ontario Airriciiltural Colletre: M.S. A., Uni- 
versity of Toronto. 
STANLEY C. STEPHENS. 

Head of Cenetics Faculty and Willinm \cal Rciinolds Dist'nou'-.hcJ I'rofe sor of 

Genetics, a B.A., Dip. Agri., M.A., CambridKC University; Ph.D., EdinburK Uni- 
versity. 
WILLIAM DAMON STEVENSON.. JR. 

Professor of Electrical fJnfjinecrinu, B.S.E., Princeton University; B.S.E.E., Carnenie 

Institute of Technolotty; M.S., University of MichiRan. 
HARRY THADDEUS STEWART, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics, Captain, Corps of Engineers, 

IT. S. Army: B.S.. U. S. Military Academy; M.S., University of California. 
EDWARD HOYLE STINSON. 

Instructor in Mechanical Eni/ineerinq, B.S., North Carolina State College. 
CHARLES CARMEN STOTT. 

Assistant Professor of Industrial and Rural Recreation, B.S.. North Carolina 

State C<illeKe: M.S.. Indiana University. 
DUNCAN ROBERT STUART, 

Associate Professor of Design, Studied at University of Oklahoma, Chouinard Art 

Institute, and Yale University under a Wier Scholarship. 
JASPER LEONIDAS STUCKEY, 

Professor of Geology, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina: Ph.d.. Cornell 

Universitv. 
WILLIAM CLIFTON STUCKEY. JR., 

Instructor and Research Assistant in Textiles, U.S., North Carolina State College. 
JACK SUBERMAN, 

A-<sistant Professor of Eniilish, A.H.. M.A.. Universitv of Florida. 
JOSEPH C.WYN SITTHERLAND. 

Agricultural Economist, USDA. B.A., Appalachian State Teachers CoIIeKe; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State ColIcKe. 
PAIU, PORTER SUTTON, 

Professor of Chemistry, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Univei-sity. 
LOUIS HALL SWAIN. 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., M.A., Duke University. 
OTTO TESZLER, 

Research Associate, Department of Textile Research and Research Assistant Pro- 
fessor. Deimrtment of Textile Chemistry: U.S.. M.S., North Carolina State Colletre. 



319 



WALTER EARL THOMAS, 

Associate Professor of Animal Industry, B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky: Ph.D., 

Cornell University. 
DONALD L. THOMPSON, 

Research Assistant Professor of Field Crops (Coop. USDA), B.S., South Dakota 

State ColleKe; Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
OLIVER GEORGE THOMPSON, 

Assistant Professor of Economics, B.A., Wofford College; M.A., Wake Forest College. 
EDWIN GILBERT THURLOW, 

Professor of Landscape Architecture, B.S., North Carolina State College: M.L..\., 

Harvard University: Charles Eliot Traveling Fellow in Landscape Architecture, 

Harvard University. 
SAMUEL LUTHER TISDALE, 

Professor of Soils, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute: Ph.D., Purdue Universitv. 
FURNEY ALBERT TODD, 

Research Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology (Coop. USDA), B.S., North Caro- 
lina State College. 
ROBERT ALFRED TOLAR, 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactic.-i, Captain, Infantry, V. S. Army: 
B.S., U. S. Military Academy. 
ELIAS LAKE TOLBERT, 

Assistant Professor of Occupational Information and Guidance, B.S., University of 

Virginia; M.A., Ohio State University: Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. 
GEORGE STANFORD TOLLEY, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., American University: M.S., 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
WILLIAM DOUGLAS TOUSSAINT, 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, B.S., North Dakota Agricultural 

College: M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
SAMUEL B. TOVE, 

Research Associate Professor of Anim.al hidustry, B.S., Cornel University: M.S., 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
HENRY KEITH TOWNES, JR., 

Research Professor of Entomology, B.S., B.A., Furman University: Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
ROBERT TINNEN TROXLER. 

Assistant Professor in Industrial Arts, B.S., M.I. A., North Carolina State College. 
HULDAH BRINKLEY TURNER, 

Instructor in English, A.B., Woman's College, University of North Carolina; M.S., 

North Carolina State College. 
WILLIAM CALHOUN TURNER. 

Insturctor in Mathematics, B.S., Furman University: M.A., Duke University. 
GEORGE FRANKLIN TURNIPSEED. 

Research Assistant Professor of Entomology, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
NEWTON UNDERWOOD, 

Professor of Physics, B.S., Emory University: M.S., Ph.D., Brown University. 
VON HARDY UNDERWOOD, 

Instructor in Horticulture, B.S. North Carolina State College. 
ROBERT PHILLIP UPCHURCH, 

Research Assistant Professor of Agronomy, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; 

Ph.D., University of California. 
SIDNEY HARMON USRY, 

Research Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., University of North 

Carolina. 
MEHMET ENSAR UYANIK, 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, B.S.C.E., M.S.. Ph.D., University of 

Illinois. 
CORNELIUS HENRICUS MARIA VAN BAVEL, 

Associate Professor of Soils and Soil Scientist (U.S. I). A.): M.S., Wageningen Agri- 
cultural College (Netherlands); M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
JAN VAN SCHJLFGAARDE. 

Research Assistant Professor of Aaricultural Engineering, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.. Iowa 

State College. 
LILLIAN LEE VAUGHAN. 

Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering, B.S., North Carolina State College; 

M.E., Columbia Universitv. 
FRANCIS JOSEPH VERLINDEN. 

.\ssistant Professor of Experimental Statistics, B.S., Catholic Universitv: M.S.. 

North Carolina State Colle^'e. 
•RICHARD JAMES VOLK, 

Research Assistant Professor (Coop. U.S.D.A.), B.S., M.S.. Purdue University, 

Ph.D., North Carolina State College. 



320 



EZREL ALLISON WAGES, JR.. 

Inntructor in English, A.B., Emory University; M.A., University of Chicajio. 
DAVID RUDGER WALKER, 

Renearrh Aa»iatant Profetsor, B.S., M.S.. Utah State CollcRe: Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 
RICHARD GAITHER WALSER, 

A»»ociate I'rofes^or of Engligh, B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina 
ARTHUR W. WALTNER, 

A»90ciate Profettsor of Phygicg. B.A.. Beihel Colles:e. Kansas: M.S., Kansa.s State 

Colletfe: Ph.D., I'niversity of North Carolina. 
FREDERICK GAIL WARREN. 

Aimociate Profetgor of Animal Indugtry, B.S., Kansas State Colleite: M.S., Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania State CollcRe. 
GEORGE CARSON WATSON. 

Aggociate Profeggor of Mathematicg, B.A.. Randolph-Macon Colleife: M.A.. Uni- 
versity of Virginia. 
•ROHERT KENNETH WAUGH. 

Head of Dairy H agbandry Section and Profeggor of Animal Hiighandry, B.S., M.S.. 

Ph.D.. Purdue University. 
DAVID STATHEM WEAVER, 

Director of Agricultural Extengion Service and Profeggor of Agricultural Engi- 

neerina, B.S.. Ohio State University: M.S.. North Carolina State College. 
JOHN WILLIS WEAVER. JR.. 

Profeggor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
NATHANIEL WARREN WELDON, 

Rcgearch Aggigtant Profeggor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S., North Carolina 

STATE COLLEGE. 
BERTRAM WHITTIER WELLS, 

Profeggor Emeritug of Botany, A.B., M.A., Ohio State University: Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 
JOSEPH ARTHUR WEYBREW. 

Regearch Profeggor of Tobacco Chemigtry, B.S.. M.S.. Kansas College: Ph.D.. Lni- 

versity of Wisconsin. 
FRED BARNETT WHEELER. 

Emeritug Profeggor of Practical Mechanieg and Superintendent of Shopg, B.S.M.E.. 

North Carolina State College. 
LINDSAY RUSSELL WHICHARD. 

Aggigtant Profeggor of Engligh, B.A.. East Carolina Teachers College: M.A.. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 
WILLIAM ALFRED WHICHARD. 

Aggigtant Profeggor of Military Science and Tactlcg, Captain. Infantry. U. S. .Army: 

B.S.. The Citadel. 
CHARLEEN SWANSEA WHISNANT. 

Ingtructor in Engligh. .\.B.. Meredith College: M.A.. University of North Carolina. 
MACK WHITE. 

Aggigtant Profeggor of Air Science Major, U. S. Air Force. 
RAYMOND CYRUS WHITE. 

Aggociate Profeggor of Chemigtry, B.S., Davis Elkins College: M.S.. Ph.D.. West 

Virginia University. 
ROBERT BENJAMIN WHITE. 

Ingtructor in Engligh. A.B.. M.A.. University of North Carolina. 
WALTER DEXTER WHITEHEAD. JR.. 

Aggigtant Profeggor of Phygicg, B.S.. M.S.. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
JOHN KERR WHITFIELD. 

Aggigtant Profeggor in Mechanical Engineering. B.M.E.. M.S.. North Carolina State 

College. 
LARRY ALSTON WHITFORD. 

Aggociate Profeggor of Rolany, B.S.. M.S.. North Carolina State College: Ph.D.. 

Ohio State University. 
BENJAMIN LINCOLN WHITTIER. 

Head, Department of Fabric Development, and Edgar and Emily Hegglein Profeggor 

of Fabric Development. School of Textileg, A.B.. Williams College. 
ROBERT LYNCH WILBUR. 

Aggigtant Profeggor of Botany. B.S.. A.M.. Duke University: Ph.D.. University of 

Michigan. 
RUDOLPH WILLARD. 

\'igiting Lecturer in Furniture Manufacturing and Management, Ph.B., Yale 

I'niversity. 
HARVEY PAGE WH.LIAMS. 

Profeggor of Mathematicg. B.A.. William and Mary College: M.A.. Duke University. 
LEON FRANKILN WILLIAMS. 

Profeggor Emeritug of Chemigtry, A.B.. A.M.. Trinity College: Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins 

University. 



• On 2 je-jr leave to Peru. South America. 



321 



PORTER WILLIAMS, JR. 

htHtrurtoT in English, A.B., University of the South: M.A., University of Virpinia: 

H.A., Ciimbridpre University. 
JAMKS CLAUDE WILLIAMSON. JR. 

A:<»iHtayit I'rofessor of Agricultural Economics, U.S., M.S., North Carolina State 

Colleire. 
DAVID CLARKE WILLIS, 

Instructor in Chemistry, M.S., Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. M.S. North Carolina 

State ColleKe. 
ROBERT WHITELAW WILSON. 

Research Associate I'rofessor of Agricultural Engineering, B.S.M.E.. B.S.A.F., 

C.S.A.E., University of Wisconsin. 
THOMAS LESLIE WILSON, 

Professor Emeritus of English, B.A., Catawba Colle'jre; M.A., Wofford Collexe. 
THOMAS VIRGIL WILSON, 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Engiveering, B.S., Clemson Collesre: M.S., Purdue 

University. 
EDWIN WEEMS WINKLER, 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, B.S., Montana State Collejre; M.S.. 

University of North Carolina. 
NASH NICKS WINSTEAD, 

Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; 

Ph.Dd., University of Wisconsin. 
SANFORD RICHARD WINSTON, 

Head of Department and Professor of Sociology, B.A., Western Reserve University; 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
LOWELL SHERIDAN WINTON, 

Professor of Mathematics, B.S., Grove City College; M.A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., 

Duke University. 
GEORGE HERMAN WISE, 

Head, Animal Nutrition Section and William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor 

of Animal Nittrition, B.S., Clemson College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
WILLIE GARLAND WOLTZ, 

Professor of Soils, B.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
HENRY KUO-CHUAN WOO 

Research Associate, Department of Textile Research, and Research Instructor in 

Textiles; B.S., North Carolina State College. 
THOMAS WILMONT WOOD, 

Professor of Economics, B.S., M.A., University of Alabama: Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina. 
ARTHUR JOSEPH WOODBURY, 

Rcncarch Associate, Department of Textile Research and Research Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Textiles. 
WILLIAM WALTON WOODHOUSE, JR., 

Professor of Soils, B.S., M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., Cornell University. 
ROBERT EARL WORTHINGTON. 

Research Instructor of Chemistry, B.S., Berry College: M.S., North Carolina State 

College. 
DONALD PENNIMAN WYLIE, 

Instructor in Mathematics, B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.B.A., 

Harvard Business School; J.D., New York University. 
LKNTHALL WYMAN, 

Professor of Forest Utilization, B.A., M.F., Harvard University. 
HERBERT BERNARD WYNDHAM, JR., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, B.C.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 
ROBERT BAKER WYNNE, 

Associate Professor of English, B.A., M.A., William and Mary College. 
EMILO YACHAN 

Research Associate, Department of Textile Research and Research Instructor in 

Textiles: B.S., M.S.. North Carolina State College. 
BRUCE J. ZOBEL, 

Rctcarch Associate Professor of Forestry, B.S.F., West Virginia University. 



SPECIAL STAFF 



COLLEGE UNION 

(iKKAi.t) O. T. KnnAiii,, Director 
Jack Uhler, Assistant Director 
Carolyn S. Je.s.sup, Social Director 



322 



THE D. H. HILL LIBRARY 

Haklan Craig HrOwn, Director 

A.H.. H.S., in L.S., University of Minnesota; A.M., in I..S., University of Michiifiin. 

CATALOG DEPARTMENT 

Fiiv LiNKiiKKHV, Head of Department 

A.H.. Meredith College; U.S., in L.S., University of North Carolina 
Davoka K. Niklson, A.tHiKtaut CataJon Librarian 

H.S.. Utah State Atiritultural Colleire: B.S., in L.S.. University of North Carolina 
EVKI.VN H. NoHi.iN. AnxiHtant Calaloti Librarian 

H.A.. Chowan Collek'e: A.H., U.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Katiikuink .\i.sto.n Eiksai.i,, Head of Department 

A.H.. Kandolph-Macon Woman's College: A.M., Columbia University: H.S. in L.S.. 

Catholic University of America 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 

Maky Elizabeth Pooi.e, Head of Department 

AM.. Duke University; U.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina 

ORDER DEPARTMENT 

A.N.NK I.KACii TiKNKH. Hiad of Department 

A.B.. University of North Carolina; H.S. in L.S., Columbia University: A.M.. in L.S., 
University of Michigan 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT 

Ac Kntl.K MrCAii.iAKO. Hi ad of Department 
A.H., Davis ami Elkin-i. U.S. in L.S., 
University of North Carolina 

SERIALS DEPARTMENT 

Ckcii. K. Mrl.Koi), Head of Department 

A.H.. University of California at Los Angeles; M.S. in U.S., 

Western Reserve I'niversity 
Gloria K. Wiikt.stone, Serials Catalop Librarian 

A.B., Duke Univei-sity: B.S.. in L.S., 

University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENTAL LIBRARIES 

Katiikuink McDiak.miu, Librarian, School of Textiles Library 

U.A., tioucher CoUei^e; H.S. in L.S.. Columbia University 
Harrye Lyons, Librarian, School of Design Library 

U..\.. University of Iowa; .A.M., in L.S., University of Denver 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Roy B. Clogston, Director 
Willis R. Casey, Assistant 
Bill. Hkn.si.ev. Athletic I'ublicilii Director 

COACHES 

BASEBALL: Victor Sorrell 

BASKETBALL: Everett N. Cask, Head Coach;CARL Anderson, Victor Bibas, Assistants 

FOOTBALL: Eari.e Edwarii.s, Head Coach; CAREY BREffiaAKER, Albert Michaels, Pat 
Pephler, William Smaltz, Aasiatants 

FENCING: Robert J. Miravai.lb 

GOLF: ROY B Clogston 

SOCCER: Eric DeGroat 

SWIMMING; Willis R. Casey 

TENNIS: John B. Kenkiei.o 

TRACK: Willis R. Casey 

WRESTLING: Albert Crawford 



323 



INDEX 



A 

Actitities. Student 25 

Administration. Officers of 

Consolidated University 3 

Administration. Officers of 

North Carolina State College 12 

Administrative Council 299 

Administrative Officers. North 

Carolina State College 3 

Admission 1° 

Aeronautical Engineering. Course 

Descriptions 250 

Aeronautical Option. Curriculum In 118 

Agricultural Economics, 

Course Descriptions 172 

Agricultural Economics. Department of '♦0 

Agricultural Education. Course 

Descriptions 175 

Agricultural Education, Department of 78 

Agricultural Engineering. Course 

liisiTiptimis 1' ' 

Agricultural Engineering. Department of 42 

Agricultural Experiment Station 69 

Agricultural Extension Work 70 

Agricultural Foundation. Inc 294 

Agriculture. General Courses 179 

Agriculture. School of 36-71 

Curricula 36 

Degrees 37 

Departments 

Agricultural Economics 40 

Agricultural Engineering 42 

Animal Industry 45 

Botany 49 

Chemistry 49 

Entomology 51 

Experimental Statistics 52 

Field Crops 53 

Genetics 56 

Horticulture 57 

Plant Pathology 59 

Poultry Science 59 

Rural Sociology 61 

Soils 63 

Zoology 66 

Air Science. Course Descriptions 254 

Air Science 167 

Alumni Association 294 

Fund 294 

Offices 294 

Publications 294 

Animal Industry. Course 

Descriptions 180 

Animal Industry. Department of 45 

Curricula 47 

Annual Cost. Estimated 24 

Architectural Foundation 295 

Architecture. Course Description 182 

Architecture, Curriculum 74 

Army and Air Force ROTC 165 

Athletic Council 26 

Athletic Awards 31 

Athletics 26 

Audits 23 



B 



Band 27 

Barbershops 29 

Biology. Course Description 182 

Board of Trustees. Consolidated University .... 297 

Board of Trustees. Executive Committee 299 



Books and Supplies. Approximate Cost 24 

Botany, Course Description 182 

Botany, Department of 49 



Calendar 6 

Ceramic Engineering. Course Descriptions .... 184 
Ceramic Engineering, 

Curriculum 125 

Professional Study 125 

Chemical Engineering. Course Description .... 186 

Chemical Engineering, Department of 99 

Curriculum 99 

Graduate Study 101 

Professional Study 101 

Chemistry. Course Descriptions 188 

Chemistry. Department of 49 

Curriculum 50 

Chemistry, Textile, Course Descriptions 282 

Civil Engineering. Course Descriptions 191 

Civil Engineering. Department of 101 

Construction Curriculum 104 

Construction Option, Curriculum 103 

Curriculum 102 

Professional Study 106 

Clubs and Societies 25 

Coliseum 14 

College 

History 12 

Campus 13 

Services and Divisions 13 

College Extension. Division of 164 

College Foundations 294 

College Union 27 

Cooperative Agriculture Extension Work 70 

Correspondence Courses 164 

Counseling 30 

Chemistry. Agricultural and Biological 49 



Dairy Foundation 294 

Dairy Manufacturing. Course Descriptions 197 

Dairy Manufacturing, Specialized Curriculum . . 48 

Deposits 24 

Deposits. Refund of 24 

Design. Course Descriptions 198 

Design, School of 72 

Curricula 73 

Degrees 73 

Departments 

Architecture 74 

Landscape Architecture 75 

Dining Hall 24 

Division of College Extension 164 

Division of Military and Air Science and Tactic 165 

Driver Training School 165 



Economics. Course Descriptions 199 

Economics. Department of 148 

Education, Course Descriptions 203 

Agricultural Education 175 

Industrial Arts and Industrial Education . . 235 

Industrial and Rural Recreation 231 

Mathematics and Science Education 246 

Occupational Information and Guidance .... 257 

Psychology 268 

Education. School of 77 



324 



Degrefs ~S 

Departmenls 

Aoricuitural Education 7S 

Industrial Arts 80 

Industrial Education 82 

Industrial and Rural Recreation 84 

Mathematics and Science Education 89 

Occupational Information and Guidance .... 91 

Psychology 92 

Electrical Enoineering. Course Descriptions . . . 204 

Electrical Engineering, Department of 106 

Curriculum 106 

Graduate Study 108 

Professional Study 108 

Engineering. Introduction to 94 

Engineering. School of 94 

Aeronautical Option 118 

Agricultural Engineering 99 

Construction Curriculum 104 

Construction Option 103 

Curricula 97 

Degrees 95 

Departments 

Chemical Engineering 99 

Ci»il Engineering 101 

Electrical Engineering 106 

Engineering Mechanics 109 

Engineering Research 109 

Industrial Engineering Ill 

Mathematics 115 

Mechanical Engineering 117 

Mineral Industries 122 

Physics 128 

Engineering Physics 129 

Furniture Manufacturing and Msnagement . . 113 

Heating and Air Conditioning 119 

Humanities-Social Studies Program 98 

Non-Scholastic Requirements 96 

Nuclear Engineering 129 

Professional Program 132 

Short Courses and Institutes 97 

Engineering Foundation 294 

Engineering Mathematics. Curriculum 115 

Engineering Mechanics. Course Descriptions . . . 208 

Engineering Mechanics. Department of 109 

Engineering Physic«. Curriculum 130 

Engineering Physics. Graduate Study 131 

Engineering Physics. Master of Science Program 131 

Engineering Research. Department of 109 

Engineering Research News 295 

English. Course Descriptions 209 

Freshman Composition , 209 

Literature 211 

Speech 210 

Writing 210 

English. Department of 148 

English Entrance Requirements 18 

Enrollment. Summary of 1955-1956 296 

Entomology. Course Descriptions 211 

Entomology. Department of 51 

Curriculum 52 

Expenses. Estimated 24 

Experimental Statistics 213 

Extension Division 164 

Extension Farm News 295 



Forestry Foundation 295 

Forestry. School of 134 

Curricula 134 

Degrees 135 

Fellowships. Scholarships, Loan Funds 137 

Forest Management 137 

Forest Management Curriculum 138 

Forest Management, Fields of Specialization 139 

Freshman Year 137 

Pulp and Paper Technology 143 

Pulp and Paper Technology. Curriculum .... 143 

Short Courses 137 

Wood Products Merchandising 144 

Wood Products Merchandising, Curriculum.. 145 
Wood Products Merchandisinij, 

Fields of Specialization 146 

Wood Technology 140 

Wood Technology, Curriculum 141 

Wood Technology, Fields of Specialization. . 142 
Foundations 

The Agricultural Foundation. Inc 294 

The North Carolina Architectural 

Foundation, Inc 295 

The North Carolina Dairy Foundation, Inc.. 294 
The North Carolina Eng.neering 

Foundation, Inc 294 

The North Carolina Forestry Foundation . . . 295 
The Noith Cirolina State College 

Foundation. Inc 294 

The North Carolina Textile Foundation, Inc. 294 
Frater.iities 

Honorary 25 

Social 25 

French, Course Descriptions 254 

Furniti.;" Manuf.ittjring fn:l Msnaqement 

Curriculum 114 



Gaston Technical Institute 165 

General Studies. School of 147 

Den'rtiiifiits 

Economics 148 

English 148 

History and Political Science 149 

Modern Languages 149 

Philsophy and Religion 150 

Physical Education 150 

Social Studies 150 

Sociology and Anthropology 151 

Organization 148 

Genetics 56 

Genetics, Course Descriptions 222 

Geological Engineering 

Course Description 224 

Curriculum 126 

Professional Study 127 

German. Course Descriptions 255 

Glee Club 27 

Government, Student 23 

Grading System 20 

Graduate Degrees 164 

Graduate School 163 

Graduation. Requirements for (See curricula listings 

and descriptions for various Schools) 

Grants-in-Aid 31 



Fabric Dttelopment, Course Descriptions 280 

Fees 22 

Fellowship, Graduate 32 

Fiber and Yarn Technology 153 

Field Crops, Course Description 216 

Field Crops. Department of 53 

Curriculum , 54 

Graduate Study 55 

Financial Ai I 31 

Forestry, Course Descriptions 218 



H 



Health 29 

Accident Insurance 29 

Infirmary 29 

Physical Examination 29 

"eMing >nd Air Conditioning, Curriculum .... 120 

History Course Descriptions 226 

History and Political Science. Department of . . 149 

History, Entrance Requirements 19 

Honor System 25 



325 



Horticulture. Course Descriptions 228 

Horticulture. Oepirtment of 57 

Curriculum 58 

Housing 28 

Humanities — Social Studies Prooram for Engineering 

Students 98 



I 

Industrial Arts and Industrial Education. 

Course Descriptions 235 

Industrial Arts. Graduate Study 80 

Industrial Arts Education. Curriculum in 81 

Industrial and Rural Recreation. Course 

Descriptions 231 

Industrial and Rural Recreation. Department of .84 

Curriculum 84 

Options 85-88 

Industrial Education. Department of 82 

Curriculum 83 

Industrial Engineering. Course Descriptions . . 239 

Industrial Enginaering. Depirtment of Ill 

Curriculum 112 

Graduate Study 113 

Professional Study 113 

Industrial Recreation. Option in 85 

Infirmary 29 

Institutional Recreation, Option in 87 

Instruction. Officers of 300 

Italian. Course Descriptions 256 



Knitting Technology 155 

Knittin'j Technology. Course Descriptions .... 279 



Landscape Architecture 75 

Landscape Architecture. Course Descriptions . . 242 

Landscap; Architecture. Curriculum 76 

Late Registration 24 

Leazar Dining Hall 24 

Libraries 

D. H. Hill 14 

School of Design 72 

School of Textiles 159 

Loans 31 



M 



Mathematics. Entrance Requirements 19 

Mathematics. Course Descriptions 242 

Mathematics. Curriculum in Engineering 

Mathematics 115 

Mathemitics. Depirtment of 115 

Mathematics and Science Education 89 

Mathematics and Science Education. Course 

Descriptions 246 

Mechanical Engineering, Course Descriptions . . . 247 

Mechanical Engineering. Department of 117 

Aeronautical Engineering Option Curriculum 118 

Curriculum 118 

Heating and Air Conditioning Curriculum . . 120 

Professional Study 121 

Mechanized Agriculture. Curriculum 44 

Medical Examination before entrance 29-30 

Metallurgical Engineering. Course Descriptions .252 
Military and Air Science and Tactics. Division 

of 165 

Military Science. Course Descriptions 253 

Military Science and Tactics 166 

Military Training 165 

Military Uniforms and Equipment 167 



Mineral Industries 122 

Modern Languages, Course Descriptions 254 

French 254 

German 255 

Italian 256 

Russian 256 

Spanish 255 

Modern Languages, Department of 149 

Music 27 



N 



Non-Resident Applicants 20 

North Carolina Dairy Foundation. Inc 294 

North Carolina State College Foundation. Inc.. 294 

North Carolina Textile Foundation. Inc 294 

Nuclear Engineering 129 

Nuclear Reactor Building 14 



Occupational Information and Guidance. 

Course Descriptions 257 

Occupational Information and Guidance. 

Department of 91 

Officers: 

Administration of. Consolidated University . . 3 
Administration of. North Carolina State 

College 3 

Administrative Council of North Carolina 

State College 299 

Administration Officers. North Carolina 

State College 299 

Board of Trustees 297 

Executive Committee. Board of Trustees 299 

Instruction: Faculty of North Carolina 

State College 300 

Special Officers 322 

Orchestra 27 

Out-of-state Students 20 



Park Administration, Option In 88 

Payment of Fees 22 

Philosophy and Religion. Course Descriptions . . 258 

Philosophy and Religion. Department of 150 

Physical Education. Course Descriptions 259 

Physical Education. Department of 150 

Physical Education. Requirements 30 

Physics. Course Descriptions 262 

Physics. Department of 128 

Curricula 129 

Placement 31 

Plant Pathology. Course Descriptions 265 

Plant Pathology. Department of 59 

Political Science (See History and Political 

Science) 149 

Political Science. Course Descriptions 226 

Poultry Science. Course Descriptions 266 

Paiiltrv Science, Department of 59 

Curriculum 60 

Professional Clubs and Societies 25 

Professional Program. School of Engineers .... 132 

Admission 132 

General Regulations 133 

Psychology. Course Descriptions 268 

Psychology. Department of 92 

Graduate Study 93 

Psychology. Experimental Laboratory 93 

Publicaticns 

Student 25 

College 295 

Pulp and Pzper Foundation. Inc 295 



326 



Pulp and Paper Technology 143 

Curriculum 143 



Regular 22 

Sp.'cial 23 

Un;lassi(ied 23 



Record. Stale College 295 

Recreiticn (See Industrial and Rural Recreation) 

Refunds 24 

Registration, Late 2* 

Religion (See Philosophy and Relioion) 150 

Religion. Course Descriptions 258 

Religious Centers 2/ 

Research 

Engineering 109 

Textiles 157 

Research and Farming 295 

Reser»e Officer's Training Corps 165 

Financial Aid 167 

Organization 167 

Selective Service and ROTC 168 

Uniforms and Equipment 167 

Residence 20 

Reynolds Coliseum 14 

Room Rent 23 

Rural Recreation. Option in 36 

Rural Sociology. Course Descriptions 271 

Rural Sociology. Department of 61 

Curriculum 62 

Russian. Course Descriptions 256 



Sanitary Engineering. Curriculum 

( Professional Study ) 105 

Scholarships 20 

Schools 

Agriculture 3'? 

Design 72 

Education 77 

Engineering 94 

Forestry 134 

General Studies 147 

Graduate 163 

Textiles 151 

Science Education, Curriculum 89 

Selective Service in relation to ROTC 168 

Social Fraternities 25 

Social Studies. Course Description 274 

Social Studies. Department of 150 

Societies 25 

Sociology and Anthropology, Course Descriptions 274 

Sociology and Anthropology, Department of . . . 151 
Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering 

Curriculum (Professional Study) 105 

Soils Course Description 276 

Soils. Department of 63 

Curriculum 64 

Spanish. Course Desaiption 255 

Sports. Athletic 26 

Statistics. Course Descriptions 213 

Statistics 65 

Structural Engineering, Curriculum (Professional 

Study) 105 

Student Activities 25 

Student Government 25 

Students. Classifications 25 

Aud itors 23 

Graduate 163 



Technical Bulletins 295 

Technical Clubs and Societies 25 

Testing and Counseling 30 

Textile Chemistry. Curriculum 162 

Textile Foundation 294 

Textile Publications 295 

Textiles. Course Descriptions 278 

Fabric Development 280 

Fiber and Yarn Technology 284 

General Textiles Courses 284 

Knitting Technology 279 

Textile Chemistry 282 

Textiles. Curriculum 160 

Textiles. Options 161 

Textiles. School of 151 

Departments and Divisions 

Consulting Service 159 

Fabric Development 156 

Fiber and Yarn Technology 153 

Knitting Technology 155 

Library 159 

Machine Design and Development 158 

Placement Bureau 159 

Synthetic Fibers Division 158 

Textile Chemistry 156 

Textile Research 157 

Extension Courses 153 

Inspection Trips 153 

Short Courses 153 

Sponsored Professorships 159 

Transportation Engineering, Curriculum 

( Professional Study) 106 

Trustees 297 



Vocational Testing and Counseling 30 



V/ 



Wildlife Conservation and Management. 

Curriculum in 67 

Fields of Specialization 68 

Wood Technology 140 

Curriculum 141 

Fields of Specialization 142 



VVn Terhnology (See Fiber and Yarn 

Technology ) 153 

Young Mens Christian Association 27 



Zoology, Course Description 287 

Zoology. Department of 66 

Curriculum in Wildlife Conservation and 

Management 67 



327 



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328 




ITS PRODUCT 



State College is proud of its thousands of well-trained, substantial 
alumni who are helping- to build a better world. They are now engaged , , . 

• in erecting bridges over giant chasms. 

• in building dams and power plants to rescue wastelands 
and give light and power to millions. 

• in teaching farmers all that science has learned about 
agriculture. 

• in stringing highways throughout the land. 

• in clothing the civilized world in the finest and most durable 
raiment the textile industry can produce. 

• in creating new magic in chemistry and ceramics. 

• in developing and conserving our natural resources. 

• in putting power into mechanical giants. 

• in preserving and replanting our forests. 

• in designing and constructing homes and buildings more 
pleasant and comfortable and appealing than earlier gen- 
erations ever knew. 

• in delving into a thousand research projects from which 
will emerge richer and fuller lives for untold millions. 

These productive and creative alumni serve both to point up the out- 
standing quality of the research and teaching activities of State College 
and to furnish inspiration and stimulus to both faculty and students of 
the present and future. State College has high regard for the youth of 
North Carolina; it piedges itself to continue the highest possible level of 
instruction. 



330 



\. C. State l)el()n|n.s to all the peo- 
ple, and has luiutions imicjiie among 
the (ol leges and uni\ersities ol om' 
state . . . we seek a more eflic lent and 
diversified agric idtnre: better manage- 
ment ol our lorests and ntili/aiion of 
their prodiuts; the dexelopment of 
belter methods for our textile, lobar- 
co. lurniiure, and oiher indusirits . . . 

. . . more a])pliiaiion ol the |)rin( i- 
ples ol enginei'rini; lo irairsportal ion. 
the de\eloj)meni ol oui resourcis. .tiid 
greater di\c'rsili( ai ion ol industriis; 
better designing ol honu-s. schools. 
hospitals. (huK lies, and hu lories: and 
I he I raining ol better xoc aiional leac h- 
ers and recreational diriciors. 

Carey HoyI lioslicni 
C/ifitK rllor. /y^i) — 



331 




PREPARED THROUGH THE OFFICES OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 
AND DEVELOPMENT AFFAIRS • PRINTED BY THE 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE PRINT SHOP 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 



332 



CATALOG ISSUE 1956-1958 





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niDPfTHDV FACULTY, ADMINISTRATIVE, 

UllVLtlV/l\l • AND CLERICAL STAFFS 



OCTOBER 
1956 




NORTH 

CAROLINA 

STATE COLLEGE 

RECORD 



RALEIGH 



STATE COLLEGE RECORD 

\ol. 54 Otiobci. I <•")() No. 14 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 
OF AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

DIRECTORY ISSUE 

FACULTY, ADMINISTRATIVE AND 
CLERICAL STAFFS 

College Exchange TE 4-5211 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS: 

In event of lire, call Raleigh Fire DciKiiinient _ TE 2-7733 

Ihen call M. and O 328 or TE 3-8528 

In event of emergency at night, Sundays or Holidays 

Call M. and (). .Security Desk 451 or TE 2-2944 

Jn case of accidents, call Inhrmary TE 2-761.") 

or Rex Hospital TE 2-7521 



N. C. STATE COLLEGE 

STATE COLLEGE STATION 
RALEIGH 

October, 1956 



Published monthly by the N. C. State College of AKriculture and EngineerinK. Entered as second- 
class matter October 16, 1917 at the Post Office at Raleigh, N. C. Under Act of August 24. 1912. 



SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTORY LISTING— 1956-57 
FACULTY AND STAFF ADDITIONS 



Name 

•AUgood. James 

Avcrcttc, Yrcd C. 

Harkcr, Kenneth 
•Battc. Edward C. 

Bcntlcv, Janice C 
•Reck, Frances R. 
•Rlanchard. D. D. 
•Rlizard, Marion 

Roardnian, Elizabeth 



Depl. Office 



Ext. Address 



Ag. Ext. 
Soils 
Plant Path. 
Animal Ind. 
Rotany 
Nat'l Sci. Reg. 
An. Ind. 
Exp. Statistics 
Fielil (aops 
Rrunimett. Thclma Occup. Inf. S: Guid. 



Jr. 



'Riirks. Edward C. 
•Rvrd. Dewitt. Jr. 
•Campbell. Janet T. 
•Campbell. Patricia 
•Chaplin, Jas. F. 

Chcsnnt. Roberta T 
•Chew, \ictor 
•Coleman, Jean M. 

Cornelison, Ann 
•Criglcr, Henrv T. 

Culbreth. \\'inifrcd P. 
•Daniel, Harrv' 

David.son, Marjorie 
•De. Rajendra K. 
•Dean. .Alfred 
•Donnhn. dive W. 
•Dorsey, W. E. 
•Dunlap, F. Chris 
•Edwards, John C. 
•Everleigh, Ailcne B. 
•Farrow, Elizabeth 
•Fish. Fred 
•Flvnn, John 
•Foard. Donald E. 

Fornev, John K. 

Freyre, Raol 
•Gardner, Sue L. 
•Giles, Jane H. 

Glass. Rebecca S. 
•Hackler. W. C. 
•Ilanimill. Shirley 
•Haflcy, William L. 
•Mclpuera, J. I. con 
•Hcndershott. C. H. 
•Henderson, Peggy 
•Hiatt, .Andrew 
•Hinson, Doris R. 
•Hisada, .Alice 

Jarratt. .Allan 
•Jenkins. John M. 
•Kelly, Virginia 

Kim, Yon Song 
•Kiscr, Lila 
•Kline, David M. 



Ag. Inf. 

Plant Path. 

Tob. I.it. Serv. 

1 ex. Res. 

Field Crops 

Nat'l .Sci. Reg. 

Exp. Statistics 

Nat'l Sci. Reg. 

EngT. Mechanics 

Textiles 

Nat'l Sci. Reg. 

Ag. Inf. 

Psvchologv 

Entomology 

Rural .Soc. 

Horticulture 

An. Ind. 

Agriculture 

Tex. Res. 

Soils 

Design 

Zoology 

Entomology 

Botany 

Rural Socinlog^' 

Physics 

Ag. Econ. 

Botany 

.Soils 

Min. Ind. 

Tex. Res. 

Exp. Statistics 

Hist. & Pol. Sci. 

Horticulture 

Ag. Ed. 

Botany 

Horticulture 

Plant Path. 

Rural Soc. 

Ind. Arts 

Exp. Station 

Min. Ind. 

Tex. Res. 

Plant Path. 



209C Patterson 291 

422 AVilliams 334 

200 Gardner 310 

An. Dis. Lab. 480 

iri4 Gardner 267 

2:53 1911 Rldg. 265 

An. Dis. I.ab. 486 

4.\ Patterson 386&387 

1U2 Williams 222 

2:56 191 1 Rldg. 47.S 
120 Ricks 279 & "IE 2-6541 

102 Gardner 3«0 

205 Library 477 
22 Nelson Textile 288 

429A Williams 334 

233 1911 Rldg. 265 

3 Patterson 386 & 387 

23:5 1911 Rldg. 265 

242 Mann 317 & 404 
30;> Nelson Textile 287 

233 1911 Rldg. 265 

120 Ricks 279 

llIA Tompkins 365 

126 Gardner 408 

340 1911 Rldg. 465 

218 Kilgore 318 

An. Dis. Lab. 486 

111 Patterson 331 
R-37 Nelson Tex. 412 
356 Williams ' 220 
200 Rrooks 438 
167 Gardner 239 
229 Gardner 384 
262 Gardner 267 
•540 1911 Rldg. 465 
308 Daniels 353 
205 Patterson 358 
252 Gardner 267 & 379 
305 Williams 209 

110 Page 249 
R-.50 Nelson Tex. 414 
6 Patterson ' 386 & 387 
109 Winston 3.56 

112 Kilgore 275 & 455 
102 Tompkins 257 
262 Gardner 267 
225 Kilgore 318 

111 Gardner 373 
:540 1911 Bldg. 465 
106 Tompkins 258 
104 Patterson 471 
108 Page 249 
■."2 Ncl.s<in Textile 28« 
204 Gardner 382 



405 Union, Gary. N. C. 1 

Route 2. Oxford, N. C. 

2100 Hillsboro 

1063 Nichols 

10141/2 Canterbury 

2309 McMullan Circle 

1217 Kent Rd. 

18 Enterprise 

B-5 Shclton Apt. 

Box 625, Chapel Hill. N. ( 

910 Faircloth 

Wendell, N. C. 

4201 AVcstern Blvd. 

114 Faircloth 

UK 31 Vetville 

D3B Cameron Ct. Apts. 

2128 May view 

1 104 Glenwood 

3041/2 Forest Rd. 

1326 Mordecai Dr. 

5207 Melbourne Rd. 

2402 Clark 

3107 Raymond 

201 Purefoy Rd., Chapel H 

3002 Lewis Farm Rd. 

3925 Western Blvd. 

635.A Daniels 

410 W. Jones 

1117 Brooks 

201 1 14 Fairview Rd. 

825 Woodburn 

Buffaloe Trailer Park 

925 Tower St. 

Conner Dorm., Chapel Hi! 

Aluiniii Rldn. 

2315 Van Dyke 

College View Trailer Park 

Route 4 

3035 Lewis Farm Rd. 

815C Daniels 

IK 44 Vetville 

5041/. North St., Chapel H 

.3010"Farrior Rd. 

Rt. 5, Box 178 

2312 Grant Ave. 

.307 Chamberlain 

Carv. N. C. 

Gold Dorm. 

2409 Green way Ave. 

806 N. Blount St. 

306 Gold Dorm. 

604C Smedes PI 

2717 Oberlin Rd. 



• Married 



\ II rue 
•Kiibin, Julius 

1 cuis. Anne 
•Liggiiis. Donald \V. 
•LiiulscN, Marvin F. 

Loesch! P. J. 
•McCracken, R. J. 
•^fcGovern, Troyce D. 
•McKcan, Catherine S. 
•McKinney, Muncy B. 
•McLean, Lucy S. 
•McPhcrson, W. W. 
•Maine, Ellsworth 

Mailios, William 

Mia. Abdul Jabbar 
•Middlcton, G. K. 
•Milton, Charles R. 
•Murray, Edward A. 
•Neal. ii. G. 
•Neunzig. H. H. 
•Oliver, Faith 
•Overton, E. Glenn 
•Parker, Mattie Erma 
•Parker, Robert W. 

Parker, AVade T. 

Pasour, C. E. 

Pate, Donald 
•Perry, Margaret 
•Pinney, Edward L. 



Dept. 

Tex. Res. 

Zoology 

Tex. Res. 

Exp. Statistics 

Field Crops 

Soils 

Ind. -Arts 

Serials 

Ag. Econ. 

Exp. Statistics 

Ag. Econ. 

Plant Path. 

Exp. Statistics 

Botany 

Field Crops 

Psychology 

Textiles 

Ag. Engr. 

Entomology 

Soils 

Registration 

Hist. & Pol. Sci. 

Ag. Inf. 

Engr. Mechanics 

.\g. Econ. 

Poultry 

Soils 

Hist. & Pol. Sci. 



•Poston, Hugh A. Central Res. Station 



Prince, Harold L. 
•Ragland, Irene 
•Riggs, Robert 
•Sasscr, Sybil 

Shcarin, Marjorie 
•Shclton, James 
•Smith, Vara 
•Sncdecor, George W. 
•Stircwalt, Hazel 
•.Stout, Roy G. 

Stroud, George 
•Stubbs, Audrey M. 

Swift, Eleanor D. 
•Thigpen, M. E. 



Genetics 

Soils 

Plant Path. 

Tex. Res. 

Ag. Ext. 

Soils 

Psychology 

Exp. Statistics 

Tex. Res. 

Ag. Econ. 

Tex. Res. 

Genetics 

Modern Lang. 

Ag. Econ. 



•Thompson, Hannis W., Jr. Elec. Engr. 



• Irovcr, James R. 
Mlburg, L. C. 
•\an dcr Vaart, H. R. 
•X'crrcault, Peggy 
•\(.lk. R. J. 
•\\akcley, Sue 
•Wallace, Mary A. 

Waller, Marcus 
•Wcntz, Patricia 

Wiggins, R. E. 
•Wilkinson, Helen 
•Wise, Milton B. 
•Wood, Alton E. 
•Young, D. A., Jr. 

Young, James N. 
•Young, Talmage B. 
•/.obcl, Bruce 

• Married 



Botany 

An. Ind. 

Exp. Statistics 

Ag. Econ. 

Soils 

Agriculture 

Business 

Psychology 

Circulation 

Textiles 

Rural Soc. 

An. Ind. 

Genetics 

Entomology 

Rural Soc. 

Ind. .Arts 

Forestry 



Office Ext. 
B-46 Nelson Textile 414 

168 Gardner 239 
yir> Nelson Textile 413 

IB Patterson 386 &: 387 

106 A Williams 222 

.'560 \Villiams 220 

106 Tompkins 258 

Library 344 

2ir> Patterson 469 

W Patterson 386 & 387 

203 Patterson 358 

206 Gardner 310 

12 Patterson 386 & 387 

261 Gardner 267 

118 Williams 222 

I12B lompkins 401 
115 Nelson Textile 420 
New Ag. Engr. Bldg. 475 

237 Gardner 384 

351 W^illiams 363 

12 Holladay 205 8c 219 

15 Winston 356 

113 Ricks 457 

248 Mann 317 

210 Patterson 469 

109 Scott 366 

226 \VilHams 345 

115 Winston 3.56 
\Vestern Blvd. TE 3-5446 

353 Gardner 385 

356 Williams 363 

200 Gardner 310 

B-48 Textile 416 

214 Ricks 242 

.'151 Williams 209 

124 Tompkins 286 

112 Patterson 313 & 335 

B-48 Textile 416 

201 D Patterson 355 

140 Textile 416 

353 Gardner 385 

205 Peele 231 

214 Patterson 308 

427 Daniels 395 

260 Gardner 267 

111 Polk 305 & 268 

101 E Patterson 313 & 3,35 

201 A Patterson 3.55 

.".83C Williams 363 

111 Patterson 362 

105 Holladay 295 
112B Tompkins 401 
Library 372 
.307 Textile 419 
.340 1911 Bldg. 465 
214 Polk 326 
385 Gardner 385 
326 Gardner 409 
338 1911 Bldg. 312 

106 Tompkins 258 
252 Kilgore 270 



Address 

118 N. Boylan 

215 N. Blount 

133 Prospect 

3008 Leonard 

2412 Everett Ave. 

2328 Grant Ave. 

334 .Angier Ave. 

3429 Redbud Lane 

Rt. 1, ^Vilson's Trailer P; 

418 \Vayne Dr. 

2114 Buckingham 

2634 Kilgore St. 

211 Gold Dorm 

130 \Voodburn Rd. 

2817 Mavview 

213 Dennis 

3200 Bedford Ave. 

1510 Simpkins St. 

207 Poplar St. 

1024 Minerva .Ave., Durhai 

Darien Dr. 

2511 Stafford .Ave. 

107 Chamberlain St. 

Gold Dorm. 

2905 Wade Ave. 

2403 Countrv Club Ct. 

113 Maxwell' Rd., Chapel ¥ 

3614 Western Blvd. 

Route 4 

3314 Pollock PI. 

liox 4405 State Coll. Sta. 

1.508 Frank St. 

3113 Redbud Lane 

2.338 McMullan Circle 

AVilders Grove 

2114 Buckingham Rd. 

2319 Grant Ave. 

2.325 Grant Ave. 

P. O. Box 23, Youngsville, 

3204 Childers 

Route 4 

718 Rosemont Ave. 

2804 Barmettler St. 

2310 Van Dyke 

218 Chamberlain 
812 Henderson Rd. 
2256 Circle Dr. 
1213 Dixie Trail 
.509 Cole St. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
12 Maiden Lane 
1512 Fairview Rd. 
2004 Smallwood Dr. 

Route 3 

1220 Filmore 
1404 Crest Rd. 



SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTORY LISTING— 1956-57 
FACULTY AND STAFF CHANGES 



Name 

Anderson, \Vinifred 
•Baker, \V. Donald 
•Bartholomew, \V. V. 
•Bean, Carolyn L. 
•Bli/ard. Warren E. 
•Boies. Ralph C. 
•Bor^. Alfred F. 
•Bradford, E. H. 
•Bridge, Gladys G. 

Butler. Patrick C. 
•Casadv. R. B. 
•Gates. David M. 
•Clarke, Alisonc M. 
•Cook, H. D. Pulp 

•Craig, Harris B. 
•Crawford. Louise 
•Crawford, Ora 
•Davis, W. H. 
•DaN berry, Charles D. 

Drenowatz, Margaret 

Erdman, Howard E. 

Farrier, Maurice 
•Fitts, J. W. 
•Foradori, George T. 

Giles, Jose 
•Glo\er, Jo Ann N. 
•Goldthwait, C. F. 

Guarnieri, Guiseppe 

Ham, N. B. 

Harden. Kath 
•Harkema, Reinard 
•Harrell, George O. 

Hefti, Heinz 

Hirschmann, Hedwig 
•Hitchings, R. G. Pulp 
•Howard. Margaret F. 
•Jackie. Roger W. 

Jackson. \V. A. 
•Johnson, E. Sigurd 
•Jones, Berry E. 
•Kclman, Arthur 

Kendrick. Alma Mae 
•LaChance, Leo E. 
•Lee, John F. 
•Lihby, C. E. Pulp 

Lin. Clara 

McArthur. Anne 

•Magee, Aden C. HI 

•Mangum, G. Dent 

•Marks. Olcn F. 

•Merritt. Ernest C. 

•Miller. Gene W. 

Mills, Lucy Tuck 

•Mochric. Richard D. 

•Montenegro, Enrique 

•Moorr Vr ank H. 

• Married 



Dept. 


OQice 


Ext. 


Tex. Res. 


21 Textile 


288 


Zoology 


167 Gardner 


239 


Soils 


:?.")8 \\illiams 


220 


Soils 


2T2. Williams 


470 & 488 


Mech. Engr. 


222 Broughton 


447 


Mathematics 


222 Tompkins 


228 


Botany 


213 Gardner 


379 


Tex. Res. 


.S.")2 Textile 


413 


Registration 


10 Holladay 


219&:3r)l 


Soils 


:U)7 Williams 


209 


Zoology 


.'!">") Gardner 


44.-) 


Tex. Res. 


10 Textile 


288 


Economics 


2.30 1911 Bldg. 


333 


8: Paper Tech. 


Western Blvd. 


485 


An. Ind. 


215 Polk 


276 


Registration 


10 Holladay 


219 & 351 


Exp. Station 


104 Pat. 444 &TE 2-6526 


Field Crops 


114 Williams 


ooo 


V(;\. Res. 


140 Textile 


ile 


Tob. Lit. Serv. 


20.') Library 


477 


Genetics 


.S")3 Gardner 


385 


Entomology 


340 Gardner 


409 


Soils 


210 Williams 


470 & 488 


Exp. Statistics 


120E Patterson 


TE 3-2454 


Genetics 


.'i.'il Gardner 


385 


Design 


200 Brooks 


343 


Textiles 


126 Textile 


413 


Design 


200D Brooks 


343 


Economics 


230 1911 Bldg. 


333 


Registration 


10 Holladay 


219 & 351 


Zoology 


363 Gardner 


445 


Min. Ind. 


104 Page 


249 


Tex. Res. 


126 Textile 


413 


Plant Path. 


2 Gardner 


473 


& Paper Tech. 


Western Blvd. 


485 


Circulation 


Library 


372 


Tex. Res. 


B-48 Textile 


416 


Soils 


.366 Williams 


363 


Indus. Engr. 


328 Riddick 


.307 


Tc\. Res. 


.32.') Textile 


413 


Plant Path. 


3 Gardner 


473 


Registration 


12 Holladav 


205 &: 219 


Genetics 


3r>3 Gardner 


385 


Mech. Engr. 


309 Broughton 


448 


& Paper Tech. 


^\'estern Blvd. 


485 


.Soils 


383 Williams 


363 


Tex. Res. 


B-48 Textile 


416 


An. Ind. 


310 Polk 


241 


Tex. Res. 


B-52 Textile 


293 8c414 


Textiles 


118 Textile 


41 


Tex. Res. 


32.') Textile 


413 


Botany 


262 Gardner 


379 


Registration 


\',\ Holladay 


351 


An. Ind. 


111 Polk 


305 


Design 


103 BrcMiks 


438 


English 


7-9 ^\■inston 


325 



Address 

3320 Runin St. 

1228 Banbury 

618 Stacy St. 

2323 Grant Ave. 

18 Enterprise 

1311 Crabapple Lane 

1235 Onslow Rd. 

Galax Dr., Rt. 6 

^^'ake Forest, N. C. 

2714 Rosedale 

Rt. 2 

2416 Greenwav Terrace 

-3413 Churchill Rd. 

1820 White Oak Rd. 

Rt. 4, Buck Jones Rd. 

.\pt. 33-G \etville 

2209 ShefTield Rd. 

UK .34 Vct\ille 

603 N. Blount St. 

D-1 Shelton Apts. 

202 Gold Dorm. 

Box 44, Route 6 

1021 Gardner St. 

UK 3 Vetville 

205 Gold Dorm. 

3410 Hillsboro 

2112 Ridge Rd. 

118 Woodburn Rd. 

Rt. 5 

1615 Hillsboro St. 

1430 Chester Rd. 

1808 ^Vilshire Ave. 

405 Brooks Ave. 

11 Hillcrest Rd. 

3427 Rcdbud Lane 

28111/, Mavvicw Rd. 

2811 Bedford 

2714 Rosedale 

1806 Oberlin Rd. 

Rt. 1, Carv. N. C. 

3430 Rcdbud Lane 

H-2 Shelton .\pts. 

117 Cox Ave. 

409 Furches St. 

I4.il» Brooks 

3'-'(>") Hillsboro 

226 Chamberlain 

2320 Clark, Apt. F 

P. O. Box5.301,S. C. SU. 

Pine Dr., Rt. 6 

315 Marsh Ave. 

UK 33 Vetville 

3.320 RufTui St. 

116 Bvrum, Gary 

3211 Churchill Rd. 

3513 Leonard St. 



\ame 


Dept. 


Office 


Ext. 


•Ogreii. Herman A. 


Zoology 


355A Gardner 


445 


Pinkcrton, Claire R. 


Registration 


13A HoUaday 


351 


I'oolc. Jt>yce 


Grad. School 


145 Gardner 


429 


•Raal). Kenneth D. 


Registration 


13C Holladay 


205 & 219 


•Rani>c\, Harold A. 


An. Ind. 


.^.02 Polk 


241 


Reid. Elbert 


Foundations 


101 Holladay 


253 


•Reitzcr. Ladislas F. Hist. & Pol. Sci. 


1 1 1 Winston 


356 


Rogers. Jacqueline 


Soils 


222 Williams 


470 & 488 


•Ross. John P. 


Plant Path. 


209 Gardner 


310 


•Sanderford, Mavis D. 


Agriculture 


1 15 Patterson 


211 


•Sims, Barbara Anne 


Engr. Res. 


236 Riddick 


436 


•Stanton. Mary S. 


Exp. Statistics 


110 Patterson 


375 


•Stroup, Rose Marie 


Registration 


10 Holladav 


219 & 351 


Taylor, Maybelle Pnlp 


& Paper Tech. 


AVestern Blvd. 


485 


• Icszlcr. Otto 


Tex. Res. 


22 Textile 


288 


Toilcy, George S. 


Ag. Econ. 


2I5C Patterson 


469 


•Tompkins, E. H. 


Engr. Res. 


233 Riddick 


4.36 


•Toussaint, W. D. 


Ag. Econ. 


215A Patterson 


469 


•\aughan, Linwood H. 


Tex. Res. 


325 Textile 


413 


W cssling. \Volfgang 


Genetics 


351 Gardner 


385 


•W hitc. Ellen B. 


Ag. Ext. 


101 Ricks 


244 


•Whitfield, John K. 


Mech. Engr. 


315 Broughton 


448 


Woodall. Mrs. Clyde H. 


Stu. AfE. 


11 Holladay 


219 



Married 



Address 

923 Tower St. 

2502 Vanderbilt 

500 ^V. Park Dr. 

Garner, N. C. 

Rt. 1. Gary. N. C. 

Ill Berkshire Rd. 

9 Ashe St. 

3314 Pollack PI. 

225 Buck Jones Rd. 

102 Home St. 

219 Park Ave. 

2502 Clark Ave. 

P-3 Country Club Homes 

1013i/,Mordccai Dr. 

2303 Churchill Rd. 

902 Lake Boone Trail 

106 Pogue St. 

Rt. 6 

Franklinton, N. C. 

3402 Hillsboro Rd. 

1905 Park Dr. 

2377 McMullen Circle 

G-2 Country Club Homes 



FACULTY SENATE STANDING COMMITTEES, 1957 



AGENDA COMMITTEE 

W. W. Austin, Chairman 

R. J. Monroe, Vice Chairman 

L. W. Seegers, Secretary 

COMMUNICATIONS 

R. J. Monroe, Chairman 
E. W. Glazener 

C. G. Mumford 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

H. M. Nahikian, Chairman 

G. S. Abshier 

J. D. Clark 

\V. A. Reid 

L. W. Seegers, Ex-Officio 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

E. M. Schoenborn, Chairman 
A. C. Barefoot 

D. M. Gates 
R. Gussow 
G. B. James 
A. Kelman 
G. W. Poland 



PERSONNEL POLICY 

J. S. Doolittle, Chairman 
A. A. Banadyga 
K. S. Campbell 

F. D. Cochran 
P. H. Harvey 
S. Noblin 

PERSONNEL PROBLEMS 

H. M. Cortcr, Chairman 

R. C. Bryant 

V. M. Faires 

H. B. McCullough 
STUDENT AFFAIRS 

E. G. Thurlow, Chairman 

R. C. Bullock 

D. S. Hambv 

J. W. Pou 

J. F. Seely 

H. E. Speece 

SPECIAL COMMITTEE, 1957 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 
J. W. Pou, Chairman 

G. S. Abshier 
R. C. Bullock 
J. S. Doolittle 
J. F. Seely 



1956—19 57 



DIRECTORY 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF 
AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



LISTING 

FACULTY, ADMINISTRATIVE AND 
CLERICAL STAFFS 




STATE COLLEGE STATION 
RALEIGH 



INDEX FOR MAP 



A. A. A. Building 


50 


Dorm. Office 


1 


Agr. Economics 


35 


Eco 


nomlcs 


9 


Agr. Engineering 


50 


Education, Dean 


15 


Agr. Extension 


32 


Electrical Eng. 


27 


Agr. Dean 


35 


Enq 


lineering. Dean 


26 


Agronomy 


43 


Engineering Drawing 


23 


Alumni Secretory 


2 


Engineering Mechanics 


26 


Animal Husbandry 


39 


Enc 


lineerlnq Reseorch 


25 


Architecture 


29 


English 


10 


Athletics 


58 


Entomology 


44 


Auditorium 


10 


Eth 


ics 


9 


Biology 


44 


Fie! 


d Crops 


43 


Book Store 


8 


Forestry, Dean 


49 


Botany 


44 


Foundations 


1 


Building Supt. 


21 


General Studies, Dean 


9 


Business Office 


1 


Genetics 


44 


Cafeteria 


14 


Geology 


11 


Ceramic Enq. 


18 


Graduate School 


44 


Chancellor 


1 


History 


9 


Chemical Eng. 


26 


Home Demonstration 


32 


Chemistry 


30 


Horticulture 


49 


Civil Eng. 


28 


Ind 


ustr. Arts 


15 


Coliseum 


58 


Industr. Engineering 


26 


College Engineer 


31 


Infl 


rmory 


52 


College Extension 


31 


Landscape Design 


29 


Cotton 


43 


LOL 


indry 


20 


Dairy Research 


39 


Library 


40 


Dean of Students 


I 


Mo 


rketing 


35 


Design, Dean 


29 


Mo 


themotlcs 


15 


Diesel Eng. 


37 


Mechanical Enor. 


38 


1. Holladay Hall 




25. 


Enq. Research 




2. Alumni Hall 




26. 


Riddick Lab. BIdg. 




3. Welch Hall 




27. 


Electricol Eng. 




4. Gold Hall 




28. 


Civil Engineering 




5. Fourth Hall 




29. 


Doniels Holl 




6. Brooks Hall 




30. 


Withers Holl 




7. First Hall 




31. 


1911 Building 




8. Watouqa Holl 




32. 


Ricks Holl 




9. Peele Hall 




33. 


Zoology Building 




10. Pullen Hall 




34. 


Nuclear Reactor 




1 1. Primrose Hall 




35. 


Patterson Hall 




12. Syme Hoi! 




36. 


U. S. Post Office 




13. Y.M.C.A. 




37. 


Diesel Eng. BIdg. 




14. Leozer Hall 




38. 


Broughton Holl 




15. Tompkins Holl 




39. 


Polk Holl 




16. Field House 




40. 


D. H. Hill Librory 




17. Riddick Field 




41. 


U. S. Bureou of Mines 


18. Ceromics 




42. 


Agronomy Greenhouses 


19. Power Plont 




43. 


Williams Holl 




20. Loundry 




44. 


Gordner Hall 




21. Warehouse 




45. 


Student Union 




22. Pork Shops 




46. 


Scott Holl 




23. Page Holl 




47. 


Bot. i Zool. Gr. Hus. 




24. Winston Hall 




48. 


Horticulture Gr. Hus. 





Military Dept. 


42 


Modern Longuoqe 


9 


Novy R. 0. T. C. 


68 


Nuclear Reactor 


34 


Physical Educotion 


56 


Physics 


29 


Plant Pathology 


44 


Poultry 


46 


Print Shop 


63 


Psychology 


15 


Purchosing 


1 


Registror 


1 


Rurol Sociology 


31 


Sanitary Engr. 


28 


Service Dept. 


21 


Shops 


22 


Sociology 


9 


Statistics 


35 


Supplies 


21 


Textiles, Dean 


51 


Textile Research 


51 


Tobacco 


43 


U. S. Post Office 


36 


Veterans Adm. 


1 


Vetville 


64 


Visual Aids 


32 


Wood Prod. Lob. 


70 


Y. M. C. A. 


13 


Zoology 


44 



49. Kilgore Holl 

50. Mongum Holl 

51 . Textile Building 

52. Clork Holl 

53. Berry Holl 

54. Bagwell Holl 

55. Becton Holl 

56. Thompson Gym 

57. Porking Areo 

58. Reynolds Coliseum 

59. Alexonder Holl 

60. Turlington Holl 

61. Owen Holl 

62. Tucker Holl 

63. Printing Shop 

64. Vetville 

65. Trock Bleochers 

66. Boseboll Field 

67. Tennis Courts 

68. U. S. N. R. Armory 

69. N. Y. A. Group 

70. Forestry Lob. 

71. Troiler Pork 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

For the Academic Year \9')6'yl 

THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY 

N. C. State College 

I'icsident William C. Friday 

Acting Provost „...\Vi]liam M. \\'hyl)urii 

\ice President and Finance Oflicer W. D. Carmithacl, Jr. 

Acting Business Officer and Treasurer A. H. Shepard 



Administrative Council 

Chancellor. Chairman Carey H. Bostian 

Dean of Student AfTairs, Secretary — _ J. J- Stewart 

Business Manager - J. C. \'ann 

Director. DevelopinciU and Pul)lii Relations L. L. Ray 

Dean of tlie Faculty ^ _ Jo'>" ^^'- Shirley 

Dean. School of Agriculture _ _ - D. W. (^oKard 

Dean, ScIuk)! of Design .. H. L. Kamphoefner 

Dean, Sdiool of Education J. B. Kirkland 

Dean, School of Engineering _ J. H. Lampe 

Dean, School of Forestry R. J. Preston 

Dean, School of General Studies ..._ _ C. A. Hickman 

Dc.ui. S<hool of Textiles M. E. Campbell 

Adiuj? D<an. Ciraduale Sdiool W. J. Peterson 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



College, Schools, and Departments 



l)cft(t)liiii-nl 

(:n.\\c:i.i,i.()R 

HFAN OK IMK. FACULTY 
lU SINF.SS MANACiFR 
niRF.CrOR OF FOINDAIIONS 
DEAN OF Sri DENF AFFAIRS 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULFURE 

Dtaii 

Diiicior of lustiiutioii 

Director of Extension 

Asst. Dir. of Extension 

Asst. Dir. of Extension 
Director of Research 

Asst. Dir in ciig. of Tobacco Research 

Asst. Dir. of Research 
Agrimliiiral Economics 

Farm Management Extension 

Farm Marketing F.xlension 
Agricuhural Engineering 

.\gricnltnral Engr. Ext. 
.\gricultiMal Information 
.\nimal Inchisiry 

.\ninial Husl)an(iry Section 

.Animal Hiisi)an(!rv Extension 

.\nimal Nutrition Section 

Dairy Husbandry Section 

Dairy Extension 

Dairy Mainifactnring Section 

\etcrinary Section 
Hiological Sciences, Div. of 

Botany 

Entomology 

Entomology Extension 

Cenctics 

Plant P.ithologv 

Plant Pathology Extension 

Zoology- 
Chemistry 

Experimental Statistics 
Field Crops 

.Agronomy Extension 
4-H Club (Extension) 
Home Demonstration (Extension) 

Ciolhing 

F.tmilv Relations 

Foo<ls and Nutrition 

Home Management 

Home Marketing 

Housing ^ Hon.se Furnishings 
Horticulture 

Horticulture Extension 
Poultry Science 

Poultry Extension 
Program Planning (Extension) 
Rural Sociology 
Soils 



llr.ul 


Ollnr 








Jixt. 


C. H. Hostian 


y- Ilolladav H, 


ill 






2I(/ 


J. W. Sliirley 


III) Hollachn IL 


dl 






466 


J. G. Vann 


l()r> Ilolladav H; 


ill 






295 


L. L. Ray 


"A" Hollada^ Hall 






322 


J. J. Stewart 


!.'()(; Holladay H; 
Ollice 


all 






456 


D. W. Colvanl 


\\r> Patterson 








211 


V. A. Rice 


III Paterson 








331 


D. S. Weaver 


101 Ricks 








213 


R. W. Shoffnei 


UK) Ricks 








213 


C. B. Ratchfon. 


no Ricks 








213 


R. L. Loworn 


10.'? Patterson 


315 


& TE 


2- 


6526 


search \V. E. Colwell 


lot Patterson 








444 


H. -A. Stewart 


102 Patterson 








471 


H. li. James 


21 (MS Patterson 








308 


W. L. Furner 


liliO Patterson 








306 


}. M. Curtis 


220-E Patterson 








291 


G. W. Giles 


203 Mangum 








405 


H. M. Ellis 


•516 Ricks 




274 


& 


389 


O. B. Copeland 


112 Ricks 


472 


& TE 


2- 


6.541 


J. W. Pou 


117 Polk 




320 & 


431 


E. R. Barrick 


21(i Polk 




276 


& 


326 


Jack Kcllcv 


20.'? Polk 








269 


G. H. Wise 


im J'olk 








241 


j. E. Legates 


115 Polk 








268 


George Hvatt, Jr. 


102 Polk 




321 


& 


277 


W. M. Roberts 


204 Polk 








371 




-Animal Disease 1 


lildg. 


FE 4 


-7336-7 




1L5 Gardner 






429 


H. T. Scoiieki 


2")0 (iardner 








267 


C. F. Smith 


1 12 (Gardner 








408 


George D. Jones 


HO Ciardncr 








201 


S. G. Stephens 


3.")3 (;ardncr 








385 


D. E. Ellis 


III (.ardncr 








373 


Howard R. (Harris 


'.) Gardner 








336 


F. S. Barkalow, Jr. 


l.')6 Gardner 








239 


^V. J. Peterson 


107 ^Vithcrs 








266 


J. A. Rigney 


112 Patterson 




313 


& 


335 


P. H. Harvev 


2.-.« Williams 








217 


E. R. Collins 


2*)2 Williams 








294 


L. R. Harrill 


200 Ricks 








214 


Ruth Current 


101 -A Ricks 








244 


Jidia Mclver 


;{00 Ricks 








221 


Coriinie J. Griinslcy 


;?0(» Ricks 








221 


S. \irgiuia \\'ilson 


213 Ricks 








354 


^(amie N. \\ hisnant 


30.") Ricks 








285 


Rose E. Bryan 


214 Ricks 








242 


Paidine E. Gordon 


210 Ricks 








462 


F. D. Cochran 


120 Kilgore 




275 


& 


4.55 


John H. Harris 


23,"i Kilgore 








296 


E. W. Gla/cncr 


120 .Scott 








280 


C. F. Parrish 


211 .Scott 








377 


F. S. Sloan 


109 Ricks 








292 


C. H. Hamilton 


.3.3<» l'.)ll Bldg. 








312 


J. W. Fitts 


210 Williams 








470 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 
Ocan 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Dean 

Agricultural Education 

Industrial Arts 

Industrial & Rural Recreation 

Occup. Infor. c*s: Ciuidancc 

I'sycholog)' 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Dean 

Director of Instruction 
Chemical Engineering 
("ivil Engineering 
F.iectrical Engineering 
Fngineering Mechanics 
F.ngincering Research 
Industrial Engineering 
Mathematics 
Mechanical Engineering 
Mineral Industries 
Nuclear Reactor 
Physics 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

Dean 

I orestry (Extension) 

Forest Management 

Lumber Products Mfg. 

Pulp Technology 

Wood Products Laboratory 

SCHOOL OF GENERAL STUDIES 
Dean 

Economics 
English 

History &: Political Science 
Modern Languages 
Physical Education 
Philosophy & Religion 
Social Studies 
Sociology 

SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 
Dean 

Director of Research 
F'abric Development 
Fiber & Yarn I echnology 
Knitting I echnology 
Machine Design 
Placement 
Textile Chemistry 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
Acting Associate Dean 

ALUMNI AFFAIRS 
Director 



H. L. Kamphoefner 




250 & 343 


J. Bryant Kirkland 


1 19 Tompkins 


256 


C. C. Scarborough 


lO.'J Tompkins 


257 


Ivan Hostetler 


lOG Tompkins 


258 


Thomas I. Mines 


Field House 


350 


Rov N. Anderson 


224 1911 Bldg. 


478 


Howard G. Miller 


123 Tompkins 


286 


J. H. Lampe 


229 Riddick 


216 


W. E. Adams 


232 Riddick 


332 


E. M. Schocnborn, Jr. 


113 Riddick 


301 


Ralph E. Fadum 


354 C. E. Bldg. 


432 


Goarge B. Hoadley 


320A Daniels 


236 


G. Wallace Smith 


240 C. E. Bldg. 


317 


N. \V. Connor 


124 Riddick 


248 & 423 


R. G. Carson 


328 Riddick 


307 


H. A. Fisher 


201 Tompkins 


227 


Karl P. Hanson 


211 Broughton 


246 


W. W. Austin 


109 Page 


249 


Raymond L. Murray 


31 Nuclear Reactor 


393 


A. C. Menius, Jr 


5 Nuclear Reactor 


229 


R. J. Preston 


160 Kilgore 


270 & 282 


John L. Gray 


264 Kilgore 


407 


T. E. Maki 


152 Kilgore 


406 


Roy M. Carter 


158 Kilgore 


270 


C. E. Libby 


Pulp & Paper Lab. 


TE 4-2235 


James S. Bethel 


166 Kilgore 


282 


:s 

C. Addison Hickman 


103 Pecle 


223 


Clark L. Allen 


102 Peele 


333 


Lodwick Hartley 


1I8B Winston 


325 


Preston 'W. Edsall 


114 Winston 


356 


George 'W. Poland 


205 Peele 


231 


Paul H. Derr 


Frank Thompson Gym 


218 


W. N. Hicks 


204 Peele 


374 


George A. Gullette 


212 Winston 


200 


Sanford Winston 


202 Peele 


374 


Malcolm E. Campbell 


101 Textile Bldg. 


273 & 422 


William A. Newell 


107 Textile 


273 


B. L. Whittier 


103 Textile 


289 


Elliot B. Grover 


111 Textile 


327 


W. E. Shinn 


104 Textile 


289 


C. M. Asbill, Jr. 


117 Textile 


420 


G. H. Dunlap 


110 Textile 


421 


H. A. Rutherford 


21 Textile 


341 



W'. J. Peterson 145 Gardner 



429 



H. W. Taylor Alumni Bldg. 252 & TE 3-1010 



aiiii.kucs 

l)in'( l<ir Jv (.oil Cn.ii li 

Asst. I>ir. X: .Swinmiiiig C!(>;irli 

H.isthall Coadi 

Uasrh.ill Coach ( !• rcslimaii) 

naskclhall Coadi 

Football Coaiii 

St)acr S: Tciuiis Coacli 

Track Coach 

Puhlicily Director 

Wolfpack C;iul) Director 

lU'SINESS OFFICE 
Uiisiiiess Manager 
Asst. lUisiiKss Manager 
Cashier 
I'ersonnel Odiier 

CAFEFERIA 

Director 

COI.ISEIJM 

Director 

COI.I.FGE EXTENSION 

Director 

DORMIIORV REN FAL 

Supervisor 

INSTITUTE OF STATISTICS 

Director 

I IllR ARV, D. H. HILL 
Director 
Catalog Dcpt. 
Circulation Depl. 
Documents Dept. 
Order Dept. 
Reference Dept. 
Design Library 
lextilc Library 

MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS 



Roy H. ClogstoM KlL' Colisenmm 

Willis R. Ca.sey KM) Coliseum 

X'ictor C. .Sorrell 10(5 Coliseum 

Jennings 11. Edwards Ciymnasium 

Everett N. Case lliO Coliseum 

Earle L. Fdwarcis 101 Coliseum 

Jotin F. kenlield, jr. (iynuiasium 

Paul Derr {.\nniasiiuii 

Bill F. Ilenslev IL'I Coliseum 

Harry E. Stewart lOH Coliseum 



J. G. Vann 10.') Holladay 

W."M. Murray "ir' Holladay 

]. Curtis Hall "R" Holladav 

James R. Swiger Primrose Hall 



A. (;. Sutherland, Jr I.ea/ar Hal! 

Roy U. Clogslou 101,' Cioliseuui 

E. W. Ruggles IIS l'.)ll WUhr. 

Janie.s S. Fulglium, Jr. 1 Hollailay 

Gertrude M. Cox 110 Patterson 



llail.ui C Urown 

Maltha 1 oy I ineberrv 

Kathcrinc A. F.dsall 

Mary E. Poole 

Anne L. lurner 

Mrs. Ac McGalliard 

Mrs. Harrve Lyons 

Katherine McDiarmid 



IE 


2-2407 


IE 


L'-LMO? 


IF. 


1 L'L'II 




2l!S 


IE 


•1 IHHl 


IE 


2-r.<»:5t 




2IS 




21 H 


IF 


:'.-i(i2o 


1 K 


1-22H 




295 




298 




278 




481 


TE 3 


l«2.f.-6 


IK 


2-2107 



2:?S ."t IE 1-3333 
349 
375 



Director 

.Asst. Director 

Central Stores 

Shcjps 

Power Plant 

Grounds Supt. 

Transjjortation Supt. 

.•\sst. College Engineer 

Property 

Chief Clerk 

Laundry 

NEWS BUREAU 

Diiec tor 



J. McCree Smith 

Macon R. Rowland 

.\. H. Adams 

R. W. Mayton 

Frank R. Kennedy 

John G. Duncan 

Leon I. Parrish 

Robert E. Fitc 

John E. Higgins 

Catherine L. Raby 

Joseph R. Cower 



i:U) Library 


259 


lOS Library 


344 


108 Library 


S72 


MS Library 


398 


Ii:< Library 


344 


122 Library 


398 


201 Brooks Hall 


301 


112 lexiile BIdg. 


421 


101 Morris BIdg. 




102 Morris BIdg. 




Morris BIdg. 


•Ifi.'l 


Morris BIdg. 


392 


Power Plant 


TE 3-8528 


Morris BIdg. 


) 328 


Morris BIdg. 


234 


Morris BIdg. 


451 


Morris BIdg. 




Morris BIdg. 




Laundry 


283 



Rudolph Pate 

N. c:. c:r()P i.mprox k.mfm a.ssociai ion 

Director John C. Rice 



101 Hollail.n Hall 



253 



I'.l.iA Williams 



207 S: IE 1-7512 



N. C. lOlNDA HON SI 1.1) I'RODl (KRS. INC. 

Mallard R. \V. McMillan I'JI Williams 

IRINT SHOP 

M.maRcr L. B. I'liillips I'liiil .Sli()|) likig. 

ri R{:n.\siN(. Di-iM. 

rmchasiiiR Agent W. L. Fleming 200 Morris Uldg. 

Asst. Puicliasing Agent Mrs. Bayc Sumner 200 Morris Bldg. 

SILDENT AFFAIRS 

Dtan J. J. Stewart 206 Holladay 

Dean of Stuiicnls E. L. Cloyd 9 Holladay 

Student Acti\itics Banks C. Talley, Jr. 207 Holladay 
College I nion 

Director G. O. T. Erdahl 21(5 Clollege Inion 

.Asst. Director Richard S. Hcaton 21 1 College I'nion 

.Social Director Paul K. Durrctt 270 College I nion 

Craft Shop Director Martha C;. Robinson Ciollcge Inion 

Food .Scr\ice Director James N. Economys College liiion 

Information Desk Corinne S. Phill)rick College Inion 

Reservations Neill S. Briggs 21() College Inion 

Music Activities C. D. Kntschinski 114 1911 Bldg. 

Student Publications Carolyn ^\■. Lane 313 1911 Bldg. 

V. M. C. A. Oscar B. Wooydridge V. M. C. A. 

.Admissions & Registration 

Director Kenneth D. Raab 13C Holladay 

.Xdmissions Office 14 Holladay 

Current Records & Information 

Senior Records & Permanent Files 

Student Personnel Lyle B. Rogers 201 Holladay 

College Counseling Center 202 Holladay 

Scholarships & Financial Aid C. ^^'. Wilkerson 206 Holladay 

Student Housing X. B. Watts 207 Holladay 

Infirmary Dr. J. J. Combs Clark Hall 

Militar\: .\ir Science Col. James F. Risher 145 Coli.seum 

Military Science & Tactics Col. R. R. Middlebrooks 154 Coliseum 

SFL DENTS SUPPLY STORES 

Cieneral Manager L. L. Ivey Y.M.C.V. Bldg. 

Asst. Manager M. H. ^Vheless Y.M.C.A. Bldg. 

Watauga Book Shop C. L. Chambers Watauga Hall 

I ri.EPHONE EXCHANGE 

Installation Oflicer Mrs. Ba\e Sumner 200 Morris BUlg. 

Supervisor Bessie B. Turner 117 Winston 

Operator .Annie P. Cooke 117 \Vinston 

Operator Rosa G. Thompson 117 Winston 

TELEVISION 

Director Roy J. Johnston \\ I NCi 1 V Bldg. 

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 

Training .Specialist Carlisle R. King IOC) 1911 Bldg. 

VETERANS HOUSING 

Manager of \'clville H. H. Hutchinson UK 5 Vetvillc 

\ isr \1. AIDS 

Head Landis S. Beiniett 3 Ricks 



TE 2-1573 



2S1 & TE 3-4151 



230 & 459 




230 




456 




215 




370 


TE 


4-7310 


TE 


4-7310 




378 




378 


TE 


4-7310 


TE 


4-7310 


TE 


4-7310 




251 


TE 


3-4810 


TE 


2-7184 




219 




205 




219 




351 


397 


& 224 




397 




460 




434 


TE 


2-7615 


314 & TE 


4-5161 




233 


225 & TE 


2-3674 


225 S: TE 


2-3674 




337 




230 

















IE 


4-6262 


TE 


3-4679 


TE 


2-4306 



458 



8 



COLLEGE COMMITTEES FOR 1956-57 



\ mi Flics - 

II. A. lislicr, Cliairm.in 
H. B. James, \'itc-(!liaiiman 
\V. \V. Austin, Senate 
'M. K. Caniphcll 
I l\. Kirkl. 111(1 
lU li.DlNC.S AM) C.ROl M)S 
C. I.. Mann. Chairman 

E. Ci. Tlunlow. Senate 
I,. (). Armstronfj; 
Horatio Caminos 

|. 11. (.ariiur 
C H. Kahn 
W . W. Woodhonse 
). M. Smith, ,\<l\is(>r\ 
C.XKFIKRIA .MUISORV ^ 

v. .\. Mariiirsek. Chaiiman 
S. C. Mayo 
Sltidciiis: 
R. P. Kennel 

I. F. Warliik 

CAMPl S srORF.S .\1)\I.S()RY 
\V. H. Pierce, Chairman 
G. B. James 
O. G. Fhompson 

Stitdriilx: 
¥.. I.. Forhes 
T. R. Hawkins 

F. E. Mintcr 

CO! ISFIM .XiniSORV 

II. n. fames, Clhairman 
R. C. Bullock, Senate 
R. J. Preston 

J. J. Stewart 
Students: 

J. Nolan 
COLLEGE EXTENSION 

C. A. Hickman, Chairman 

T. E. Maki, Senate 

R. C. Br\ant 

R. E. Fa.lum 

J. W . Pou 
COLRSES .\Nn CLRRICLLA ' 

C. E. Bishop, C:hairman 

R. C. Br\ant, Secretary 

W. .\. Reid, Senate 

L. C. Clarke 

Ivan Hostetlcr 

B. M Olsen 

H. A. Rulherff.rd 

\\'. 1>. Sicvi-nson 
FACLI FY IIOSIM I Al 1 I ^ AM) 
ORIENFAFION 

C I. Foster. Chairman 

K. L. Barklev, Secretary. Senate 

|. .\. Adams' 

R. M. C;arler 

F. L. H.irrisberj^er 

|. A. Porter 

W. A. Reid 



(.()\ FKNMFN 1 

G. B. llo.idlt'N. Ch.iiiin.ui 

i.. Matsumoio, Secretary 

W. S. Barham 

K. O. Bealtv. Jr. 

A. F. Bor>,' 

C;. I. Foster 

A. C. fLives 

C. E. I.il)i)v 
(.RADIAN SCIIOOI, \1)\II\IM K \ ll\ F 
BO.VRI) 

W. J. Peterson. Chairman 

¥.. M. .Schoenborn, Senate 

J. S. Bethel 

W. E. Col well 

J. A. Rigney 

FL A. Rutherford 

— Newton Lnderwood 

(iROLP INSlRANCiF AM) FACl'L FY 
\VELF.\RF 

C. H Ilamillon. Ciiairman 

G. H. Wise. \ ice-Clhairman 

R. N .\nderson 

J. S. Doolittle 

A. C. Flaxes 

1"). M. Peterson 

C. B. Shulenherger 

J. R. Swiger 

W. L. Turner 
HIS LORY OF I HE ClOLIEGE 

A. M. Foinilain. Chairm.ni 
^Stuart Nol)lin. \ ice (Jiaiiman 

L. W. Barnhardt 

U.C. Brown 

J. K. Clopgin 

- H. \V. Ia\lnr 
IIBR.VRY 

L. C:. Ilarile\. Chairman 

E. W. (da/ener. Senate 
K. O. Beatlv. Jr. 
Clecil Flliolt 

n. E. Ellis 
.\. J. (ioeize 
W . A. Newell 
M. Schmilt 

H. C. Brown. .\»i\isory 
O. MAX (.ARDNFR AW ARO 
P. W'. Edsall. Chairman 

F. I). C:ochran. Senate 
I. E. Legates 

P. E. Moose 
H. P. W illiams 
PA I EN IS 

). (>. \'aiui. Chairman 
I S. Bethel 
N. W. Coinur 
R. L. Loworn 
W .\. Newell 



RKADMISSIONS 

H. L. Kamphocfncr, Chaiiman 

K. D. Raal), Secretary 

W. E. Adams 

C. A. Hickman 

J. B. Kirklaiul 

|. A. Porter 

R. J. Preston 

V. A. Rice 
REI IM) Ol FEES 

E. E. C:ioyd, Chairman 

C. B. Sliulenbergcr 
. JO. Vann 
RESEARCH 

W . A. Newell, Chairman 

K. L. Barkley, Senate 

J. S. Bethel 

W. J. Peterson 

E. M. Schocnborn 

SAFETY AND HEAEFH FOR NUCLEAR 
RE AC FOR 

W. J. Peterson, Chairman 

W. W. Austin, Vice-Chairman 

H. J. Evans 

G. B. Hoadley 

A. C. Menius 

R. L. Murray 

N. L. Nemerow 

Newton Underwood 

J. H. Lampe, Ex-Officio 
SCHOLARSHIP AND S FUDEN T AID 

R. E. Fadum, Chairman 

L. B. Rogers, Secretary 

F. L Hines, Senate 
R. B. C;iogston 

J. H. Cox 

J. S. Doolittle 

G. H. Dunlap 
K. F. McKean 
C. K. Slocum 

F. G. Warren 
STUDEN I ORIENTATION 

R. L. Lovvorn, Chairman 
L. B. Rogers, Secretary 
C. H. Asbill, Jr., Senate 
R. N. Anderson 
W. W. Austin 



P. H. Derr 
G. H. Dunlap 
Roy Gussow 
C. C. Robinson 

C. K. Slocum 
Students: 

D. D. Yager, Co-Chairman 
W. B. Ball 

F". I. Joseph 
P. C. Kannan 
B. G. Little 
J. M. Nolan 
VV. J. Reavis 
R. K. Ribakove 
W. C. I homas 
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS 

F. S. Barkalow, Jr., Chairman 
-G. O. T. Erdahl, Secretary 

A. Crawford 
R. B. Knight 
O. B. Wooidridge 

Students: 
J. K. Hall 
D. A. Heinzmann 
J. H. Lively. Jr. 
D. J. Morton 
R. E. Moser 
J. B. Mvrick 
W. D. Wilkinson 
TRAFFIC 

T. C. Brown, Chairman 
J. E. Adams 
D. S. Chamblee 

G. D. Mangum 
L. L. Miller 
H. V. Park 

H. D. Rawls 
J. F". Scely 
N. B. Watts 
J. M. Smith, Advisor • 
Students: 

C. W. Hannah 
J. C. Hopkins 
R. P. Williams 
F. C. Pethel, Jr. 

D. D. Yager, Jr. 



10 



Elected Boards and Direcforafes, 1956-1957 



COI.I K(.K I MON niKlCIORME 

D. C. Brown 

E. L. Clovtl 

G. (). 1. Enlahl 

C. A. lianiilton 
A. C. Hayes 

F. G. Warren 
Studetit Members: 

J. B. Smathers, President 

E. L. Strother, Vice-President 

D. J. Morton, Secretary 
H. C. Abernethy 

B.J. Ellis 
H. R. England 
W. R. Greene 
J. T. Haney 
W. C. H.)loman 
J. V Johnson 

F. 1. Joseph 

G. 1 . I.athrop 
J. M Nohin 

P. ]. Pickcnlieini 
G. L. Fhoniason 
T. B. WiUiaras 

PI UI ICATIONS BOARD 
R. Pate, Chairman 
W. L. Fleming 
R. J. Johnston 
W. A. Newell 
B C. Talley. Jr. 
L. R. Whichard 

Slitdrnt Mrinbers: 
S. B. Bcrman 
R. P. Burns 
J M Davis 



W. A. Graham 
J. I. Gray 
A.J. Grunfeld 
C. E. Herman 
R. P. Hill 
I. E. Jones 
J. H. lane 
G. F. Lathrop 
S. E. MinU 
P. J. Pickcnheim 
J. L. Ra.sor 
R. A. Teague 
G. I,. Wailman 
C. D. Webb 
M. C. A. DIRECTORATE 
L. H. Swain, Chairman 
J. W. Pon, Vice-Chairman 

F. W. Lancaster, .Secretary 

G. B. James 
A. Kelman 
R. B. Knight 
W. C. Lewis 
R. L. Lovvorn 
C. K. McAdams 

A. J. Newton 
J. A. Porter 
L. \V\ Seegcrs 

B. C. Talley. Jr. 
E. G. Thurlow 
S. L. Tisdale 

Student Menihers; 

C. J. Law 

R. D. Siewers, Jr. 
W. McN. Turner 
R. P. Westmoreland 



11 



OFFICERS OF FACULTY SENATE, 1956-1957 

Chaiiinaii: W. N. Hicks 

Vicc-Cliainnan: W. W. Austin 

Secretary: R. J. Monroe 



Name 

Asbill, C. M.. Jr. 
Austin. W. W.. Jr. 
Barkalow, F. S.. Jr. 
Rarklcy, K. L. 
Bryant. R. C, 
Bullock, R. C. 
Caniijhtll, K. .S. 
Cochran, F. D. 
Clortcr, H. M. 
I aires, \'. M. 
(.lazener, F.. W. 
(.ussow, Roy 
llaiiii)\, n. S. 
H.n\i\. I'. 11. 
Hicks, W. N. 
nines, T. I. 
legates, J. E, 
Maki, I. E. 
Marshall. R. P. 
MtCullough. J. A. 
Monroe, R. J. 
Miiniford, C:. (;. 
Naiiikian. H. M. 
I'nlaiid, (;. W. 
I'o.i. J. W. 
Rcid, \V. A. 
S( hoenhorn, E. NT. 
Scigirs, I.. \\. 
Sicly. J. F. 
I hmlow, E. C. 
Wliiihcld. 1. K. 



Faculty Senate Membership, 1956-1957 

Term Endinsr School Address Phone 

1956 Textiles, 117 Textile 420 

1957 Engineering, 107 Page 249 
1956 Agriculture, l.")6 Gardner 239 

1956 Education, 123 lompkins 286 

1957 Forestry, 1.50 Kilgore 400 
1957 Engineering, 218 Tompkins 228 
1957 lextiles. 21 IcMilc 341 

1956 Agriculture, 21(5 Kilgore 318 

1957 Education, 224 1911 Bldg. 397 

1956 Engineering, 307 Broughton 448 

1957 Agriculture, 120 .Scott 280 
1956 Design, 112 Brooks 438 

1956 lextiles, 113 Textile 327 

1957 Agriculture, 120 Williams 263 
1956 General Studies, 204 Peelc 374 
1956 Education, Field House 350 
1956 Agriculture, 10,'') Polk 268 
1956 Forestry, 1.52 Kilgore 406 
1956 General Studies, 11 Winsion 325 
1956 Engineering, 138 Coliseum 435 

1956 Agricidlurc, 120 Patterson 313 

1957 Kiiginecring, 221 I'ompkins 228 

1956 Kngiueering, 222 lOmpkins 228 

1957 C;eneral Studies, 205 Peele 231 
1957 Agriculture, 117 Polk 320 
1957 Agriculture, 113 Withers 297 
1957 Engineering, 113 Riddick 301 
1957 (.cneral Siudies, 215 Winston 356 

1956 Engineering, 210 Riddick 357 

1957 Design. 200 Brooks 343 
1956 Engineering, 315 Broughton 240 



12 



FACULTY SENATE STANDING COMMITTEES, 1956-1957 



AGENDA COMMII lEE 

W. N. Hicks, Chairman of Senate 

VV. W. Austin. Vice-Cliaiimaii of Senate 

R. J. Monroe, Secretary of Senate 



COMMIMCATIONS 

\V. \V. Austin, Chairman 

C. G. Mumforci, Secretary 
E. W. Glazener 

coNsnrnioN and rv laws 

E. S. Harkalow, Chairman 
J. K. Whitliekl, Secretary 
R. P. Nfarshall 
R. j. Monroe (exofficio) 
I.. \v. Sccgers 
EDI CAI lONAL POLICY 
\V. A. Rcid. Chairman 
I . L nines. Secretary 

D. S. Hamby 

E. E. Maki 
G. \V. Pohuid 

E. NL Scliocnl)orn 



PERSONNEL POLICY 

K. L. Barklcv. Chairman 

K. L. Campl)cll 

P. H. Harvey 

J. E. Legates 

H. M. Nahikian 
PERSONNEL PROBLEMS 

R. C. Bryant. CMiairman 

J. W. Pou. Secretary 

J. A. McCullough 
STl DEN r AFFAIRS 

R. C. Bullock. C:hairman 

E. G. I hurlow. Secretary 

E. M. Asl)ill. Jr. 

E. I). Cochran 

H. M. Porter 

J. F. Seely 



FACULTY SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEES, 1956-1957 



REPORT TO THE \ ISITING COMMI I TEE 
\V. W. Austin, Chairman 
C. G. Mumford, Secretary 
E. W. Cdazcner 
(;. W. Poland 
L. \V. Sccgers 



HONORARY DEGREES 
J. W. Pou. Chairman 
C. M. Ashill. Jr. 
H. M. Cortcr 
I . E. Maki 
R. P. Marshall 
C. (;. Mumford 
E. G. 1 hurlow 



13 



FACULTY AND STAFF DIRECTORY 



.\'(iiiir 

•Ahhotl. Nancy C;illiain 
.\ljni//i, Calliciinc ^\'. 

•Ahshicr, C. S. 

•Adams, A. Harvcv 

•Adams. Dax id A.' 
Adams. Ha/cl C. 

•Adams, James E. 

•Adams, \\illiam Elton 

• \dkins. \'i\ian 

• \Kntu. Stanton C. 

• Alcxandii. Irene 
Alfoiei. Ella M. 

•Allen. A. V. 
•Allen, Clark I.ce 

Allen. Rc\. \Valscr 
•Allison, J. I.. 
•Allred. Ered J. 
•Alter, Alan B. 
•And)nrgey. Eloyd D. 
•Ammcrman, James I*. 
•Ammerman, Talitha C. 
•Anderson, Clharles N. 
•Anderson, Ir\in 

Anderson. Eoiiise 
•Anderson. Richard L. 
•Anderson. Ro\ \. 

Anderson, \\'inifred 
•Andrews, Walter Glenn 

• \Mtonakas. Antonios 

• \iilonakos, Eillie Hall 
•Apple, J. Lawrence 

A rant. Ana merle 

Arey, Mary L. 
•Armstrong, Eindsev Otis 
•Arnold, nid)ert C. 

• Ashill, C. M., Jr. 
•Ashlev, Elizabeth 

• Askren, William B. 
•Atkins, Mary W. 

Anrand. Leonard \V. 
•Aiirharh, II. A. 
•Anstin, Wm. W. 

• \\eielte, IVf^Kie .Adams 
•Bahl), Edith M. 
•Balxock, Willard E. 
•Madders, Hal 

Bailev. Jani*- 

• Baird. Bruce I.. 
liaker. [ames E. 

•Baker. W. Donald 
Baldo\inos. Iraniisco 



Dept. 

Exp. Stat. 

Econ. 

Ag. Ext. 

Central Stores 

7.00I. 

Forestry 

Architecture 

Engr. 

Exp. Stat. 

Air Science 

Plant Path. 

Print Shop 

Ag. E.xt. 

Econ. 

Moraxian 

Plant Path. 

Mod. Lang. 

Physics 

^v^\c TV 

Animal Ind. 

Hort. 

Math. 

Botany 

Mech. Eng. 

Exp. Stat. 

Etiiicatioir 

Tex. Res. 

Ag. Ext. 

Physics 

Eng. 

Plant Path. 

Ag. Ext. 

Ag. Ext. 

Ag. Ed. 

M. & O. 

Textiles 

M. & O. 

Psychology 

Textile Res. 

-An. Ind. 

Riir. Soc. 

Min. Ind. 

Agr. Ext. 

Library 

C. E. 

M. & O. 

M. E. 

Soils 

Botany 

Zoology 

Soils 



Office 


Ext. 


Address 


P, 


112 Patterson 


313 8: 33") 


Apt. 33-H Vctvillc 


TE2 


111 Peelc 


333 


2706 Mavview Rd. 


TE 3- 


209A Patterson 


201 


311 Wilmot Dr. 


TE2 


Morris 


463 


210 2nd St., Clavion. \. 


C. \ 


,862 (iardner 


261 






162 Kilgore 


270 


405 Brooks Ave. 


TE2 


314 Brooks 


437 


1006 Carlton Ave. 


TE4 


2.'52 Riddick 


332 


204 Faircloth 


TE 2- 


120H Patterson TE 3-24.')4 


2123 Milburne Rd. 


TE4 


14') Coliseum 


314 


3114 Ashcl St. 


TE4 


10:5 Gardner 


380 


Box 3332, State Coll. Sta 


. TE4 


Print Shop 


281 


208 Grovcland Ave. 


TE2- 


201 Polk 


269 


1314 Rand Drive 


TE2- 


102 Peele 


333 


!)17 Biookwood Dr. 


TE 3- 






3225 Darien Drive 


TE 3- 


106 Gardner 


380 


1825 Wilshire St. 


TE 2- 


207 Pcele 


231 


.3016 Mavview R<1. 


TE2- 


400 Daniels 


483 


2700 Cartier Dr. 


TE2- 


WLNC L\' 


TE 4-6262 


2212 Rumson Rd. 


TE 3 


Farm 


TE 3-0267 


Rt. 1, Carv, N. C. 


TE 3 


118 Kilgore 


4.5.5 8: 275 


Rt. 1, Carv. N. C. 


TE 3 


216 Tompkins 


228 


207 Wilmot Dr. 


TE4 


262 Gardner 


370 & 267 


801 Newbern Ave. 


IE 2- 


211 Broughton 


246 


3.305 Ruffin St. 


TE2- 


120 Patterson 


313&:335 


1007 Seward St. 


TE 3- 


224 1011 Bldg. 


478 


117 Forest Rd. 


TE 3 


21 lextile 


288 


128 Hillsboro St. 


TE3 


209 Scott Hall 


377 


Avcnt Ferrv Rd. 


TE 2- 


310 Daniels 


.353 


2100 Van Dvke Ave. 


TE4 


1') ^\'inston 


325 


2100 Van Dvke Ave., 


TE4- 


4 (.ardncr 


381 


.3015 Lewis Farm Rd. 


TE 3- 


20r. Ricks 


212 


1821 Glen wood Ave. 


TE 2- 


220 Patterson 


306 


5 Maiden Lane 


TE 2 


121 Tompkins 


346 


.308 Dixie Trail 


TE2 


M. & 0. 


302 


110 Deiniis Ave. 


TE3 


1 17 Textile 


420 


2407 Stafford Ave. 


TE 2- 


M. & 0. 


451 


105 Henderson St. 


'TE4 


112-B Tompkins 401 


3040 Lewis Farm Rd. 


TE 3- 


B 48 Textile 


416 


2600 Mayvicw Rd. 


TE 2- 


211 Polk 


310 


Rt. 4, A vent Ferry Rd. 


TE 4. 


338 Hill Bldg. 


312 


2045 Winchester Conrt 


TE 4 


100 Page 


240 


1015 .Andrews Lane, Rt. 


6 TE 2- 


111 Ri(ks 


271 


121/2 Enterprise St. 


TE3- 


D. H. Hill Library 372 


23-A A'etvillc 




438 C. E. Bldg. 


.303 


2611 Wells Ave. 


TE2- 


Power Plant 


234 


610 Dixie Trail 


TE2- 


211 Broughton 


246 


Rt. 1, Ncuse, N. C. 


TE 3- 


101-A Williams 


345 


2356 Grant Ave. 


1 E 2- 


214 Clardncr 


379 


8 Fcrndell Lane 


TE2- 


3.^)6 Ciardner 


261 


lIK-3() Veiville 


TE 3- 


10,5 Williams 


345 


3011 Hillsboro St. 





• Married 



u 



\(inir 

•Ball. F.riust 
•H.illciiRtM, Stanley T. 
•BaiiadN^a. AIIkiI A. 
•nailKT. Cliiron! W. 
- Uarl)<>iir. Ma\inc 1 . 
•|?arl)()iii. SIu'iwckhI A. 
•Han lav. William J. 
•Ilaiifoot. A. C:.. Jr. 

Uari-f(H>t. Alma 

Uailiam. (laicN Ci. 
''Bailiam. I.iinvixxl W. 
•Bailiam. Waiitii S. 
•Maikalow. F. S.. Jr. 
•Baikltv. Kcv Ice 
•Bainar.l. C. Ralph 
••Barms. K. H()\<1 
•B.iiiu's. Ha/ciciK" V. 
•Banus. Rnl.tii A. 
•Baiius. Saxf 

B.nnc'tl. Patricia .\nn 
•Banilianlt. Catherine 
•Barnh.irdt. I . \\ . Mi 

•Bainhan. \\ . J. 
•Barrick. F.lliott R. 
•Barrinper. I. aura R. 
•Barn.u. Rirhar.l 1). 
•Bartholomew. William \'. 
•Bart lev. A. J. 

Batcheliier. Lenore C. 

Batchelor. Robert E. 
•Bates. Frederick I . 
•Baumj^arten, William L. 
•Beal. Frncst O. 
•Beamon. Naomi F. 
•Beaman. Xirginia H. Occ 
•Bean. Carol\n I.. 
•Beaslev. Mar\ C. 
•Bealtv. K. ().. Jr. 
•Beers. Burton F. H 

Bell. JikIv 
•Bell. Oliver A. 
•Bell. Rel)ekah 
•Bell. Ihomas A. 
•Bell. William C:. 
•Belote. Bettv Fvler 
•Bennett. I.andis S. 
•Bennett. Nfclvin 
•Bennett. Rov R. 
•Bernstein. Mitrie E. 
•Berr\. Ernest B. 
•Bethel. James S. 
•Beihune. Ooris 

Bienart. Jidian 
•Bill. Edwanl D. 
•Bireline. George I... Jr. 
•Bishop. (Iharles Edwin 
•Bishop. Mrs. I.. W. 
•Blaikmon. Oilmus M. 



St. & 



lhl>t. 

Botany 

.M<k1. Lang. 

Ag. Ext. 

Ponl. 

I, R. R. 

Print Shop 

E. E. 

Forestry 

Dining Mall 

An. Ind. 

I ex tiles 

Ilort. 

Z(M)1. 

Psychology' 

Tex. R. 

Field Crops 

Riir. .Soc. 

Music 

Ext. Div. 

Library 

English 

Pol. Sci. 

English 

An. Ind. 

Purchasing 

Print Sh(>|) 

Soils 

F'con. 

Print Shop 

.\gr. Ext. 

Rur. .Soc. 

.\rchitccture 

Botany 

Library 

. Inf. &: Guid. 

.Soils 

Foundations 

C:hem. Engr. 

ist. S: Pol. .Sci. 

Entomology 

C. E. 

Horticidture 

ARS rSDA 

Indus. Fxp. 

Bus. OfTicc 

\'is. Aids 

.\ni. Ind. 

.\gr. Ext. 

Reg. Office 

Textiles 

Forestry 

Eng. Res. 

.Architecture 

Military 

Design 

.Agr. Econ. 

Y.M.C.A. 

An. Ind. 



Oflice 

'i."»(j (iarthier 
'1V^ Peele 
L':U Kilgorc 
lOH Scott 
I ield House 
PriiU Shop 
IL'") Daniels 
l,")! Kilgorc 



Exl. 

L'67 
231 
21)6 

S.'iO 
281 
39.5 
AW, 



I.cazar I E .3- J82.")-r) 

Basement, Polk IE .'lO.').'?! 

2;<:{ lextile HI 

210 Kilgorc 318 

I ,-.(■) {.ardiier 239 
123 Fompkins 280 
32.". lextile 413 
1.3<.l Williams 2f)3 
.329 1911 Bldg. 4r>.'. 
114 1911 Bldg. 2.'.l 
121 1911 Bldg. 2(i() S: 238 
D. n. Hill Library 372 
217-219 Winston 32.') 
1 13 W insion 3.')(i 
217-219 Winston 32.") 
2 If) Polk 326&276 
200 Morris 230 
Print Shop 281 
3 '.8 Williams 220 
i(W, Peele 333 
Print Shop 281 
1". Ricks 2,')4 
.rjC) 1911 Bldg. 4(i,") 
20()E Brooks 343 
2.").") (.ardner 2()7 
D. H. Hill Library 372 
23() 1911 Bldg. 478 
3".() Williams 363 
■•\" Hollatlay 322 

I I I Riddick 309 
11") Winston 3.')6 
327 Gardner 409 
14.".-.\ C. E. Bldg. 303 
326 Ganlner 109 

312 Polk 206 
Old Ceramic 347^464 
•B" Holladay 278 
3 Ricks 4.')8 
•M)\ Polk 241 
4-.1 Williams 329 
13 B Holladay .3.51 
206 lextile 419 
166 Kilgorc 282 
217 Riddick 3'.7 

313 Bro^.ks 437 
1"»2 C^olisciun 233 
103 Brooks 4.38 
201 -C Pattcrst)n 3.'..'> 
V.M.C..\. IE 2-7184 
An. Dis. Bldg. TE 4-7336 



Address 

1220 Duplin Rd. 
2714 Roscilale Ave. 
70". Dixie Frail 
(i2". Stacv Si. 
Cameron Court .\pls. 
71(5 \'an Buren 
208 Avon Dr. 
Ridge Rd.. Rt. 6 
2.'. 17 C:iark Ave. 
621 E. Franklin St. 
Route 1. Neusc. \. C;. 
2114 (ireenwav Fcrracc 
2610 W a<lc Ave. 
2.30". Clark Ave. 
(•astonia. N. C. 
Rt. 1. Raleigh 
n ". New Bern .\ve. 
I".IS Duplin R<l. 
1.36 Wo(.di.urn Rd. 
12") Woodburn R<l. 
1417 fackson St. 
2.".02 Stafford Ave. 
1417 Jackson 



/' 
TE 2 
TE2 
TE3 
TE 3 
IE 4 
IE3 
FE 2 
TE4 
rE3 
IE 2 
IE 4 
TE 3 
FE 3 
TE 3 
IN 4 
TE .1 
rE2 
FE 2 
TE2 

FE 2 
FE2 
TEli 



Route 3. Box 110. Raleigh TE 4 



60.-.-B WcMMlburn Rd. 

2101 Ramseur St. 

Garner. N. C. 

Rl. 1. Gary. N. C. 

1076 Nichols Dr. 

Rt. 2. /ebulon. N. C. 

.321 Meredith St. 

813 Lake Boone Trail 

2813 \an D\ke Ave. 

216 Blanchard St. 

M-"» Coiuitrv Club Homes TE 1 

2323 Grant Ave. 

714 S. Kimbrough St. 

.323 Shepherd St. 

2322 Grant Ave. 

2816 OBcrrv St. 

2601 (lamer Rd. 

2816 O' Berry St. 

1 17 Monlgonurv St. 

.3014 Lewis Farm Rd. 

6- A \ctville 

2638 Kilgorc Ave. 

410") AVestern Blvd 

2819 Kilgorc .\yc. 

31 F Vctvillc 

Rt. 1. Honcvcutt R<1. 

33(')4 .Mamance Dr. 

l".12i'2 ^'- Mar^"* Street 

11". (iardner St. 

1922 Bernartl St. 

Rt. 1. Gary. N. C:. 

727 Rinuivmctlc Rd. 

8 Bagwell Ave. 

416 Webster St., Carv. N. C. 



TEa 
FE3 

FE2 
TE3 

TE4 

TE3 
IE 4 
FF 1 



IE .1 
IE .3 
FE 4 
TEa 
TE.^ 
TEa 
TE .3 
IE .1 
TE4 
FE .3 
FE 1 
FE 1 
TE4 
TE4 
TE3 
TE4 
TE3 



TE3 
TES 



HO 



* Married 



If 



\(une 

Bliikc. Ciirl 1 . 
•Blackwcll, Frances C. 

Blakcv, Lewis H. 
•lUalock. T. Carlton 
•Blalock. Tlionias J. 
•Rlancharii, Barl)ara 
•lUanrhard. Eleanor H. 
•lilanton. Leonard Y. 

Blavloik. Lovcc 
•Bli/ard. Warren E. 
•Blow. William L. 
•Blum, (.forgc, Jr. 
•Blunicr. 1 hoinas N. 
•BoRdan. Jack F. 
•Boles, Ralph C. 
•B«)lick, C.crald M. 
•Boone, Ruth S. 
•Booth, Howard G. 

•BorR. Alfred F. 
•Bost, Rev. Raxniond 
•Bostian. Carey H. 
•Boulogne. Barhara 
•Bowcn, Henry D. 
•Bowerv, Thomas Glenn 
•Bradford. Edward H. 
Bramer, Charles R. 
•Branan, \. Carson 
•Brandt, B. B. 
•Brantlev. \'. R. 
•Braswell. Marguerite S. 
•Bredcnberg, Paid A. 
•Brenner, V. Cecil 
•Brett, Charles H. 
•Brcwbaker, C^arcv Lewis 
•Bridge, Gladvs G. 
•Bridger, C. 6. 
•Bridger, Margie Freeman 

Bridges, ^\'. S. 
•Briggs. Mrs. Xeill 
•Bright, Richard 
•Brigman. H. P. 
•Brim. Charles .\. 
•Briiiklev. Bettv P. 

Brinkley. R. M. 
•Brill, Souihgate T. 
•Brillain, F. W. 
•Brockman, Cirace \V. 
•Brooks, Betty C. 
•Brf)oks. Charles 
•Brooks, Jeannetle M. 
•Rrose. King R. 
•Brf)wn, l)a\i<l C. 
•Brown, Edmf>nd J. 
•Brown. Harlan C. 
•Brown, James M. 
•Brown, Jean C. 

* Married 



Dtl>t. 

Agr. Ext. 

Tex. Res. 

C. E. 

Ag. Ext. 

Chemistry 

An. Ind. 

Vis. Aids. 

An. Ind. 

F.ducalion 

M. E. 

Poidtry 

Agr. Engr. 

An. hid. 

Textiles 

Mathematics 

An. Ind. 

Dining Hall 

Print Shop 

Botany 

Lutheran 

Chancellor 

Plant Path. 

Agr. Engr. 

Chem. 

Tex. Res. 

C. E. 

Ag. Econ. 

Zoology 

Math. 

Tex. Res. 

Soc. Studies 

Statistics 

Entomology 

Athletics 

Registration 

Ag. Econ. 

Alumni 

M. E. 
C. U. 

Ch.E 

Poultry 

Field Crops 

Bus. Office 

Exp. Stat. 

.Soils 

Field Crops 

Poultry 

.Agr. Econ. 

Agr. Econ. 

Infirmary 

Engr. Res. 

M. E. 

Physics 

Library 

Soils 

Genetics 



Ojficc 

152 Williams 

106 Textile 
234 C. E. Bldg. 

104 Polk 
103 Withers 
An. Dis. Bldg. 
3 Ricks 

213 Polk 

1 18 I ompkins 
222 Broughton 
205 Scott 
29 Tompkins 

214 Polk 
B-51 Textile 
222 Tompkins 
214 Polk 
Leazar 

Print Shop 

213 Gardner 
622 Hillsboro 
"A" Holladay 
1 13 Gardner 
Ag. Engr. Bldg. 
3 Withers 
325 Textile 
134 C. E. Bldg. 
201 -G Patterson 
160 Gardner 
221 Tompkins 
122 Textile 

209 ^\■inston 
6 Patterson 
239 Gardner 
130 Coliseum 

10 Holladay 

210 Patterson 
Alumni Bldg. 

129 Broughton 
216 C. U. 

107 Riddick 
202 Scott 
112 Williams 
"B" Holladay 

11 Patterson 
362 Williams 
122 Williams 

105 .Scott 
203-C Patterson 
210 Patterson 
Clark 

141 Riddick 
22 Diesel 
400 Daniels 
1). H. Hill Libr 
3.30 Williams 
348 Gardner 



Exl. Address 

222 UK.-33, Vetville 

273 1508 Frank St. 

303 2323 Byrd St. 

277 1315 Brooks Ave. 

266 603 Gardner St. 

TE 4-7336 1217 Kent Rd. 

330 Rt. 4, Buck Jones Rd. 

319 19 Bagwell Ave. 

311 710 McCullough St. 

447 2104 St. James Rd. 

352 2102 Smallwood Dr. 

439 Rt. 4, Raleigh 

276&326 350 Meredith St. 

414 2700 Wayland Dr. 

228 407 Brooks Ave. 

326 200 East Edenton 

TE 3-4825 3602 Leonard St. Ext. 

281 303 Hunter St., Gary, N. 

379 904 Canterbury Rd. 

TE 2-9687 1417 Regent 

210 1903 Hillsboro St. 

373 10-E \etville 

479 3400 Octavia Rd. 

383 3435 Leonard St. 
413 Galax Dr., Rt. 1, Gary 
391 2729 Oberlin Rd. 
359 Rt. 1 , Carv, N. C. 
239 3218 Bedford Ave. 
228 152 Jones-Franklin Rd. 
413 2114 Mavview Ave. 
200 1007 Carlton Ave. 

386&387 2614 Kilgorc Ave. 

384 1425 Dixie Trail 
TE 2-6934 810 Daniels St. 

351 \Vake Forest, N. C. 

308 27-F Vetville 
TE 3-1010 UK-20 Vetville 

& 252 

94g 125 Chamberlain St. 

TE 4-7310 128 Groveland .\ve. 

309 Rt. 1, N'euse, X. C. 

352 213 X. Bloodworth St. 
222 1713 Nottingham Rd. 
298 2405 Hickory Rd. 

386&387 Box 5563, State Coll. Sta. 

363 808 Colleton Rd. 

222 Rt. 4, Raleigh 

.3S6 1208 Mitchell St. 

358 F-5 Shelton Apts. 

308 l'--5 Shelton .Apts. 

TE 2-7615 101 Enterprise .St. 

426 Wilmot Dr., Rt. 4 

203 204 Park Ave. 

483 2710 Kiltrell Dr. 

iry 2.'>9 3217 Mcrriman .Ave. 

209 .3015 Leonard St. 

385 515 Gardner St. 



PI 

TE4 
TE4 
TE4 

TE3- 

TE3- 
TE3- 
TE2- 

TE2- 
TE4- 
TE 4- 
TE 2- 
TE3- 
TE4 
TE4 

HO 7 
TE4- 
TE2- 
TE2- 
TE4 
TE4- 
TE3- 
TE4- 
TE3- 

TE3- 
TE3- 
TE4- 
TE4 
TE4 
TE 2 
TE4 
EX5- 



TE2- 

TE2- 

TE3- 

TE2- 

TE3- 

TE3- 

TE3- 

TE4- 

TE3- 

TE4 

TE4- 

TE4- 

TE2- 

TE4- 

TE4 

TE3- 

TE3- 

TE 2- 



16 



•Brown, Luther E. 

• Brown. Marvin L. I 
•Brown, I. C. 
•Brown, I . 1. 

" •Brnn. William A. 

Br\an, Rose KIlwtMjcl 
•Br\;uit. Nantv W. 
•Brvant. Ralph C. 
•Bnhas, \ it tor A. 
•Bndianan. J. ,S. 
•Bnik. Ernest M. 
•Bullock. R. C. 

Bunigardncr, Har\cy L. 
•Bundi. lutlicr \'.. jr. 
•Bunn. CM.na Rav 

Buun, Jani((- 
•Burthiiclil. Bctiv Auniaii 

• Burnet ic", B. Lawrence 
•Burnette. William IL 

Burns, Ciristel 

Burns. Jo\ce 

Biirion. Mcl\in 

Busiii. Edward E. 
•Butler. J. K., Jr. 

Butler. Patrick C. 
•Buzas. Stefan 

•CafTcv. Michael D. 
•Cady, Eoster B. 
•Caldwell. George 
Callics, George A. 
•Caniinos. Horacio 
•Camp, Mrs. Norman E. 
•Campbell. Alice R. 

Campbell, Catherine 

Campbell, (.raham 
•Campbell. Kenneth S. 
•Campbell. Malcolm E. 
•Campbell. W. W 
•Canad\, Emmett J. 

Cannon. Isabella W'. 

Capps. \'clma Maureen 
♦•Capps. \'era IL 
•Carde. Monty Stii. 

•Carlson, Irving E. 

•Carlylc, A. A. 
•Carpenter, \Villard Stu 
•Carpenter, Wiilliam L. 
Carraway. Mary 
•Carroll. AVilliam 
•Carson. Robert G. 
•Carson, \'ictor S. 



Carter, George I. 
•Carter, Rov M. 
•Carter, Riibv M. 
•Carver, I. L. 



Jr. 



DcfH. 


Ol/uc 






Ext. 


.4<lthrss 




Soils 


10.') Williams 






3L5 


314 Rose Lane 




list. S: Pol. Sci. 


\\'^ Winston 






3.')r) 


2918 Claremont Rd. 


TE 


M. E. 


:\2\ Riddick 






217 


910 Cianlerburv Rd. 


IE 


i'ouitry 


iL'li Scoit 






3()8 


1709 Bickelt Blvd. 


IE 


Bot.inv 


L'fiO (iardner 






267 


Rt. 1, Carv, N. C:. 


IE 


Agr. Ext. 


L'll Ricks 






212 


Durham. \. C. Di 


urham 


Chem. 


ll.i Withers 






2<»7 


2614 \an D\ke Ave. 


II 


Eorestry 


I'.O kilgore 






400 


Avent lerry Rd. 


IE 


.\thletics 


12(1 Coliseum 


IE 1 


1881 


707 Smedes Place 


IE 


Ag. Ext. 


L'Ol Polk 






2()".) 


2(522 (irant Ave. 


LE 


An. Ind. 


ir. P(.lk 






27r) 


rK-46 Vetville 


IE 


Math. 


L';!:> Riddick 






436 


141,-. Dixie Irail 


TE 


Poul. .Sci. 


L'LM Scott 






3<)8 


2807 Lewis Earm Rd. 


TE 


Eield Crops 


ISJ Williams 






.321 


2116 E. Lake Dr. 


LE 


An. Ind. 


.'{(t| Polk 






241 


182(5 Cdeuwoo<l .\\e. 


IE 


Ag. Ext. 


L'l Ricks 






2.-)4 


1112 Ib.iburn Place 


IE 


Dean of Eac. 


110 Holhulav 






4(i() 


1007 St. Marvs St. 


IE 


Greamerv 


Basement, Polk 


IE 


3-o-,:w 


Rl. 3. Raleigh 


IE 


Park Shop 


Park Shop 






24.-. 


Rt. 3. .\pex, .\. C. 


EL 


Library 


20.') Library 






477 


.'.19 Cianlner St. 


IE 


Eichl Crops 


ISI Williams 






300 


.'.19 (iarclner St. 


IE 


Entomoiogv 


1,'!.") (ianlner 






408 


Ciold D<.rm. 


IE 


An. In'd. 


An. l)is. Bldg. 


TE 1 


73.30 


224 \. Person Si. 


LE 


Ag. Ext. 


•2^y^ Poik 






2f)9 


2217 (.arden Place 


IE 


Soils 


:5S:? Williams 






3(53 


1004 Nichols Dr. 


TE 


Architecture 


:?1L' Brooks 






437 


Apt. \ -9, Raleigh 


IE 


Psychology 


1202 Ilolloday 






224 


2211 Hope St. 


LE 


Soils 


XW Williams 






209 


.3006 Mavview Rd. 




Mathematics 


2:'..') Riddick 






436 


2329 L\on St. 


TE 


Chem. 


.") \Vithers 






383 


14.-) I u(ker Dorm. 


IE 


.\rchiteiture 


:M7 Brooks 






437 


Rt. 6. Raleigh 


IE 


Hospital 


Clark 


TE 


2- 


761:'. 


626 W. Jones St. 


IE 


.Mumni Odice 


.Mumni Bldg. 


TE 3-1010 












& 


2.'>2 


College \'iew I railer P; 


irk 


Ag. Ext. 


211 Ricks 






462 


1902 Stone St. 


TE 


IBM 


Iloll.ulav 






442 


1206 Dogvvood Lane 


IE 


Textiles 


21 Textile 






341 


212 Pogue St. 


LE 


Textiles 


101 lextilc 


2' 


73&:422 


1313 Williamson Dr. 


LE 


Enioniology 


2:58 Gardner 






384 


LK-29 \'el\ille 


IE 


Mathematics 


220 Lompkins 






228 


2611 Wade Ave. 


LE 


I.ibrarv 


I). H. Hill Libr; 


ary 




259 


212 Brooks Ave. 


LE 


Engineering 


220 Riddick 






216 


418 Cutler St. 


IE 


Ag. Ext. 


I'M Hill Bldg. 






396 


821 Young St. 


LE 


Supply Stores 


V.M.CA. 






4.-)2 


Clavton, N. C. 




Eield Crops 


L-)S Williams 






324 


Apt. G. 2612 C;ienw(M.d 


Ave. 
TE 


Indus. Exp. 


Old Ceranuc 






464 


49 W . Dixie Drive 


TE 


. Supplv Store 


VMCA 






22,'. 


2323 Kenningion Rd. 


TE 


Exp. Sta. 


lis Ricks 






208 


Millbrook, N. C. 


TE 


Psvchology 


\'2^ Eompkins 






286 


2706 Everett .Ave. 


TE 


'I ex tiles 


102 Textile 






289 


626 Sas,scr St. 


TE 


Ind. Engr. 


.T28 Riddick 






307 


1202 BnH)ks Ave. 


TE 


E. E. 


4:V'. Daniels 






39.-) 








.rif) Ri<hlick 






427 


21.-. Lurches St. 


TE 


Ag. Ext. 


201 Ricks 






410 


2706 AiKlerson Dr. 


TE; 


Forest rv 


1".« Kilgore 






270 


70.-. BnM.ks .\\e. 


TE 


Exp. Si a. 


101 -/\ Patterson 






369 


.\pt. 12.2402 Clark Ave. 


LE 


Horticulture 










Mcihoil. N. C. 


TE 



• Married 



\<iine 

'Casady, Robert B. 

Case, Everett N. 
•Casey. Willis R. 
Clason, Louis J. 
•Claspcr, Luther A. 
'Classell, Guy R. 
•Catcs, David M. 
•Gates, Jewel S. 
•Gates. Mary C. 
•Gaudlc, Thclina W. 
•Gaviness. Betty L. 
'Cell. John W. 
•C:hadwick, Dorothy B. 

Ghambers. C. L. 
•Ghaiiiblee. Douglas S. 
•C;hanipion. Hubert, Jr. 
•Clhaplain, Robert L. 
»Ghappel, Gordon D. 

Gharcst. Father Edward 

Ghears, Margaret (Peggy) 

Gheu. Paul Pao-ho 
•Gheniae, George M. 
•Ghewning, Porter 
•Christian, John A. 
'Christmas, Thad 
•Clunnney, W. T. 

Gipolloni, Mary Ann 
•Clark, C. D. 
•Clark, Joseph D. 

Clark, Margaret E. 
•Clark. Margery B. 
•Clarke, Alisone M. 
•Clarke, Lewis J. 
•Glarkson, John M. 
•Glawson, Albert J. 
•CIa\ton, G. N. 
•C:iayton, Maurice H. 
•Cleary, John J. 
•Clogston, Roy B. 
•Gloyd, Edward Lamar 
•Coatcs, Edwin S. 
•Cochran, Fred D. 
•Cockcrham, G. Clark 

•Cockroft. Lindon U. 
•GofTev. Reid E. 
•Goggin. J. K. 
•Gole, Colleen Nf. 



Dcpl. 
Zoology 

Athletics 

Athletics 

Print Shop 

Textiles 

Ag. Ext. 

Textiles 

Genetics 

Ag. Engr. 

Ag. Ext. 

Ag. Ext. 

Mathematics 

\. C. Crop 

Imp. Assoc. 

Watauga Book Shop 



Office 

355 Gardner 

If no answer, 



Field Crops 

Ag. Engr. 

Physics 

Textiles 

Catholic 

Coll. Ext. 

E. E. 

Botany 

Ghem. 

Ag. Ext. 

Textiles 

Ag. Econ. 

Exp. Stat. 

Econ. 

English 

Ag. Ext. 

Soc. & Anthrop. 

Econ. 

Architecture 

Math. 

An. Ind. 

Plant Path. 

Engr. Mech. 

M. E. 

Athletics 

Stu. Affairs 

Ag. Ext. 

Horticulture 

Stat. 

Econ. 

Print Shop 

Ag. Edu. 

Exp. Stat. 



•Cole, James L. Soc. Studies 

•Cole, Lena Grey Bus. Office 

•Cole, Leo B. Dining Hall 

•Cole, Sarah F". Textiles 

•Coleman, Nathaniel Terry Soils 

•Collins. Emerson R. Ag. Ext. 

•Collins, Herbert Soc. Studies 

•Collins. W. B. Ag. Ext. 

* Married 



120 Coliseum 
100 Coliseum 
Print Shop 
•{lij Lex tile 
220-F Patterson 
10 Textile 
35.'^ Gardner 
200 Mangum 
lot Ricks 
309 Ricks 
235 Riddick 
189 Williams 



TE4 
rE2 



& LE 4 



Watauga 
154 Williams 
Ag. Engr. Bldg. 
312 Daniels 
233 Textile 



Ext. Address 

261 

239 
1881 
2407 

281 

413 

306 

288 

385 

342 

213 

367 

436 

207 
7542 

337 

324 

405 

353 

414 



128 1911 Bldg. 

229 Daniels 
262 Gardner 
402 \Villiams 
203 Polk 
233 Textile 
212 Patterson 
101-E Patterson 
Peele 

119 Winston 
206 Ricks 
202 Peele 

230 1911 Bldg. 
217 Brooks 
206 Tompkins 
214 Polk 

7 Gardner 
2 18 G. E. Bldg. 
1 17 Broughton 
102 Coliseum 
9 Holladay 
314 Ricks 

120 Kilgore 
1-B Patterson 



467 

395 

267 

272 

269 

414 

308 

313&335 

333 

325 

410 

374 

333 

438 

226 

276&326 

381 

317 

450 

TE 2-2407 

215 

274&389 

2758:455 

386&:387 



If no answer 313&335 



201 -G Patterson 
Print .Shop 
103 Tompkins 
2 Patter.son 

If no answer 
209-11 Winston 
1 Holladay 
Leazar 
204 Textile 
354 Williams 
252 Williams 
213 Winston 
303 Ricks 



359 

281 

257 

386&:387 

3138:335 

200 

442 

3-4825-6 

419 

220 

294 

200 

388 



Rt. 2, Raleigh 
611 Daniels St. 
18 Enterprise St. 
132 Woodburn Rd. 
1404 M(nning St. 
372 Wilmot Dr. 
2612-B Glenwood Ave. 
Peartree Road 
2612-B Cdeenwood .\ve. 
Rt. 5, Raleigh 
1508 Frank St. 
3114 Darien Dr. 

3321 Ridge Dr. 
2804 Hillsboro St. 
2125 Buckingham Rd. 
1408 Courtland Dr. 

322 Mavwood A\e. 
15 N. McDowell St. 
410 N. Blount St. 
Room 208, Clold Dorm., 
UK-43 \etville 

901 St. Marvs St. 
310 Meredith St. 
1308 S. Sanders St. 
2355 McMulIin Circle 
226 E. Park Dr. 
4071/2 Dixie Trail 
15 Furchcs St. 
2602 Cami)ridge Rd. 
4071/2 Dixie Trail 
:5413''Ghurchill Rd. 
1322 Mordecai Dr. 
2605 Clark Ave. 
2716 Knowles St. 
2607 \'an